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I'm not sure if this has been discussed before so I thought I would ask.

Paxton is 14 months old now and is due for a check up and his shots. I have been talking to a lot of people about yearly shots and some people are against them (I hear there is the same discussion about children). Do you immunize your pooch every year? If so, do they get all the shots or only specific one (ie bordatella)? If you don't immunize, do you have the Titter (spelling?) test done instead?

Any thoughts on this are appreciated. I will be talking to my vet when I bring him in for his check up about it, but was just wondering what everyone else does.

I have attached a pic of Paxton begging for treats at one of his friends birthday party.
 

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We get vaccinations every year and have never had problems. Our entire state requires that rabies and distemper be current in order to obtain a dog license, which all dog owners in Maine are required to do. We also get Lepto and Bordetella. Boarding kennels here won't take your dogs if they don't have those vaccines. I feel much better knowing that my dogs have been vaccinated and are protected.
 

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Just rabies vaccinations for now other vac,s can last up to 5 years it is pointless giving another shot if dog is immune already

you have the right idea getting titer test to show what vac,s are still in blood
 

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Getting titers is a responsible way of avoiding extra vaccinations while still ensuring a dog is protected. Many people titer everything but rabies, since rabies is mandatory in most states.

As far as I'm concerned, the hype against vaccinations is still far, far outweighed by the protection they provide. The incidence of serious accidents is simply tiny compared to the risk of the diseases they protect against.

Titers are a good compromise, but if a disease is present in your area, I simply can't understand not vaccinating for it.
 

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As far as I'm concerned, the hype against vaccinations is still far, far outweighed by the protection they provide. The incidence of serious accidents is simply tiny compared to the risk of the diseases they protect against.

Titers are a good compromise, but if a disease is present in your area, I simply can't understand not vaccinating for it.
Easy to say until you have had multiple dogs have multiple reactions!

I do believe you will still need to do the one year core vaccines...but I would get each one separately spaced over 3-4 weeks. After that I recommend titer testing.
 

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Once they have had their final booster at a year of age, my guys are vaccinated every 3 years. Thankfully, Wisconsin accepts the every 3 years rabies shot. It makes it easy to remember their schedule this way too.

The exceptions I make are for things like lepto, as the shot does not last very long and lepto can be a real problem up here, and parvo if there is a nasty outbreak.
 

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Here is Dr Dodds' vax protocol. It is important to get their vax at one year. After that, titers are a smart way to go. There's no need to introduce those chemicals if not needed. http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/DODDS-CHG-VACC-PROTOCOLS.HTM

Also, she and Dr Schulz and Kris Christine have the Rabies Challenge Fund which is studying the duration of rabies vax. You can google and read more .
 

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Easy to say until you have had multiple dogs have multiple reactions!

I do believe you will still need to do the one year core vaccines...but I would get each one separately spaced over 3-4 weeks. After that I recommend titer testing.
The statistics are what they are. My anecdotal experience having three dogs and no reactions doesn't mean that reactions don't exist, and your awful experience doesn't mean that reactions are more common than they really are.

Like I said, minimizing unnecessary vaccines is a good idea, but's still important to remember that they do vastly more good than harm.
 
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