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I found this at my local 5M Feed store. Looked like a good product. All I have by me are a Tractor Supply and Walmart. I have been feeding Diamond Chicken & Rice Adult. He always seems to have eye goop, dirty ears, and really is starting to pack on the pounds.

Figured I would try something new.

What you guys think?
 

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Joy of my heart
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Lamb Meal, Brown Rice, Chicken Meal, Chicken Fat (naturally preserved with mixed Tocopherols), Flaxseed, Whole Dried Eggs, Chicken Liver Meal, Fish Oil, Brewers Dried Yeast, Kelp, Garlic, Lecithin. Potassium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Inulin, Ascorbic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Choline Chloride, FolicAcid, d-Biotin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Thiamine Mononitrate, Sodium Selenite, Freeze Dried Aspergillus Oryzae Fermentation, Aspergillus Niger Fermentation, Bacillus Subtilis, Mixed Tocopherols, Silica Dioxide, Freeze Dried Enterococcus Faecium, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Cobalt Carbonate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Beta Carotene, Yucca Schidigera extract.

I won't pick the formula apart, but I will say that this could give the most popular commercial brands (foods found at large commercial stores) a good kick in the pants, as it looks much better than the others! :wave:
 

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Thanks for the responses. I have read that Chicken Fat in the top 4 is not a good think. I guess it was linked to Bloating. Newb here so I had to look everything up. I def. do not want that to happen.
 

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Thanks for the responses. I have read that Chicken Fat in the top 4 is not a good think. I guess it was linked to Bloating. Newb here so I had to look everything up. I def. do not want that to happen.
Here is an article about BLOAT that you may find useful. Chicken fat in the first line of ingredients (or anywhere else within the food) does not contribute to BLOAT - that is a farce.

BLOAT: Awareness & Prevention
By Stella J. Raasch​

From little on up, I was raised by parents who instilled within me a passion for learning, a degree of curiosity beyond what I believe is typical, and a desire for pragmatism in all areas of my life. As such, I am always eager to learn anything I can about everything that is of interest to me. My life focuses on my business, academics, making a difference in the lives of people and animals, and my family, which is inclusive of Goldie & Aspen, our two Golden Retrievers. I contend that the best way to take care of our canine kids is to keep ourselves open to learning new things, and even going out of our way to learn about all aspects of their care. Through my canine holistic consulting clinic, it is my responsibility to teach people about all aspects of responsible canine ownership, including the prevention of various ailments that our dogs are susceptible to. One such ailment is Gastric Dilation-Volvulus (GDV), commonly referred to as BLOAT. This term can be used to classify the following three types of BLOAT: a) Acute Gastric Dilation b) Torsion c) Volvulus (Case, et al., 2000).

BLOAT is a condition that is usually only a concern for the large and giant canine breeds, especially those with deep chest cavities. BLOAT is a process where the stomach swells with gas and/or fluid, which is referred to as Acute Gastric Dilation. When distention occurs, the stomach twists along the long axis, resulting in one of the following: a) The stomach twists at an 180 degree angle or less, which is classified as a torsion or b) The stomach twists at an angle greater than 180 degrees, which is classified as a volvulus. (Case, et al., 2000).

The signs and symptoms of the first type of BLOAT listed above (Acute Gastric Dilation) may include abdominal pain when pressure is applied to the stomach, excessive salivation/drooling, dry heaves, attempts to poop (but nothing comes out), and restlessness. If your dog is able to burp or vomit, the stomach is not twisted, just distended. But, in order to release the swelling of gas and/or fluid within the abdomen, he/she will need immediate medical attention, where the veterinarian will insert a rubber or plastic tube into the stomach so the excess gas may escape (Case, et al., 2000).

The signs and symptoms of the second and third type of BLOAT listed above (Torsion and Volvulus), incorporate those of Acute Gastric Dilation as well as other abnormalities, such as rapid breathing and heart rate, pale, cold gums and tongue due to the loss of oxygen and blood to the tissues, and disorientation, to name a few. These conditions may also result in an instantaneous collapse to the ground; these are life-threatening conditions and can result in death within a mere few minutes. Immediate surgery is the only intervention that can save them in these instances (Case, et al., 2000).

The majority of my clients have large and giant breeds dogs, but prior to visiting me, they were unknowing about the things they can do at home to help decrease the occurrence of this common disorder that takes the lives of many dogs. We know that BLOAT occurs as a result of a swelling of gas and/or fluid, but it is important to note that there is still a great deal of debate among scientists about exactly what environmental factors contribute to BLOAT, and subsequently, what can be done to prevent it. Some scientific evidence supports various cause and effect scenarios, while other studies contradict that evidence. Further, some evidence suggests that certain actions place dogs at an even graver degree of susceptibility, while others believe that those actions pose much less of a risk. However, with that said, it is important for you to be aware of all the proposed risks, so that you may possess a broader understanding, in an effort to help you determine what prevention methods you would like to implement for your canine kids.

The greatest contributing factor to the development of BLOAT is allowing dogs to eat their food too quickly. Further, it was once thought that it was safer to feed dogs from an elevated food bowl; however, this is not the case. When the food bowl is raised, it allows dogs to eat their food much more quickly, which poses a very serious danger for them. To help your canine kids slow down while eating, always feed at floor level; you could try spreading their food out on a cookie tray or on the floor, thus preventing them from gobbling down huge amounts all at once.

Another large contributing factor to the development of BLOAT is allowing dogs to eat too large of meals all at once. Some people prefer to leave their dogs food out all day so that they may eat at their leisure. But, this is problematic if the dogs choose to eat all of it at once – that is a lot of food churning around in their stomach, which makes their bodies work harder to digest it. When dogs have digestion issues, regardless if it is the result of eating too large of a meal or because the type of food provided is inappropriate for them, they often have excess gas and other gastrointestinal problems. On another note, it is also unwise to ‘free feed,’ because it makes it difficult for you to assess the eating behavior as well as control their weight.

Two of the more debatable factors contributing to BLOAT are allowing dogs to exercise before and after eating, as well as allowing them to consume large amounts of water directly before and after eating (this also applies to excess water consumption directly before and after exercising). However, I do believe that these two actions place dogs at a huge disadvantage. Think about how you would feel if you just ate a large meal and then took a jog around the block directly afterward – you would more than likely get stomach cramps. When dogs are exercised directly before and after meals, their heart rates are increased, they are panting, and their bodies are trying to regain normalcy. This cannot be accomplished effectively when they have food that is trying to be digested properly. It is highly recommended that dogs rest for one hour prior to eating and rest for at least one hour after eating.

For example, a veterinarian told me a story where one of his dogs accidentally got out the back door after eating and took off on a sprint through the field. Suddenly his dog collapsed and he had to perform immediate surgery to untwist the abdomen. Fortunately, the surgery was successful, but he did say that his dog has never been the same since. Additionally, when dogs consume large amounts of water before and after meals (this applies to dry kibble diets), the water makes the dry kibble swell within their stomachs, which is an obvious hazard.

Some scientists believe that age and family history can also increase dogs’ risk of developing BLOAT. Other factors that some believe play a role with the onset of BLOAT is feeding a food that lists a source of fat within the first few ingredients and feeding a food containing Citric Acid within the first few ingredients, particularly when the food has been wetted with water. There is also some evidence that suggests that dogs with nervous and/or fearful temperaments, as well as underweight male dogs, are at higher risk of developing of this condition (Case, et al., 2000).

As you read this, it is likely that you learned a new prevention technique for BLOAT. But again, you need to remember that some of these prevention tips possess much more significance than others, while some are slightly more debatable. For example, my understanding of canine nutrition leads me to not put as much weight into the danger of feeding a food containing a source of fat within the first few ingredients because dogs are carnivorous creatures, whose systems digest fat very well; their bodies are intended to consume large amounts of fats for energy. However, many dog kibbles contain large amounts of grains, a source of carbohydrates, to provide energy instead because it is less expensive.

For my clients, I always instruct them to enforce the following: a) Make their dogs eat slowly b) Feed small meals throughout the day c) Feed at floor level d) Prohibit excessive water intake before and after eating and exercising e) Make their dogs rest for one hour before meals and at least one hour after meals. I believe that it is wise to put forth the extra effort to help prevent the development of BLOAT, even if means changing the way things are done and adding a little inconvenience to their daily regimens. Remember, our dogs rely upon us to make responsible choices for them, so let’s do everything we can to ensure their safety and health.

References

Case, Linda P., Carey, Daniel P., Hirakawa, Diane A., & Daristotle, Leighann. (2000). Canine and Feline Nutrition (2rd Ed). St. Louis: Mosby, Inc.

PetBuzz Magazine (2008 Online version)
www.petbuzzmag.com, ©2008 Stella J. Raasch
 

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Also you might have the thyroid checked. Have a full panel. If it comes back low normal push your vet to put him on thyroid meds. Low normal is low for goldens.
 

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When I looked on their site it looks like they only have 4 distributors :(

I really like the ingredient list of the food and would be willing to give it a try. Plus the price looks good, 1 distributor that listed prices was $33.99 for 33lb bag.

But alast, like most quality foods....it would be more than a days drive to get to it.
 
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