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My 3 yr old spayed Golden has a LOT of long wispy hairs on her front and back legs which poof out a lot and give her an odd profile especially from the front. I have read these are most likely due to her being spayed, but what I can’t find the answer to, despite a lot of searching, is how do I deal with them when grooming? I’ve also read they are dead hairs and should be removed but I don’t think these are dead. There is a lot of them and they are very firmly attached. I have so far left them, or taken thinning shears to them in an effort to have them lay down a bit, but she usually just ends up looking a bit messy. Should I be removing these, and if so how? I prefer a natural looking coat so I do not use clippers and usually only trim her ears, feet, and maybe a little on feathers and tail as needed. I haven’t found a groomer who really knows how to groom a Golden to breed standard so have found no solid advice there. I’m also happy to just leave it if that’s what you advise, at this point I’m just looking for guidance what to do!
 

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Puddles
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I have the same issue and thinning shears seems to work to take the bulk of it off. But usually just blowing it back towards the feathers usually works for the most part.
I use a rake to keep the thighs under control but if you let that grow it becomes very flowing and more manageable.

There is a really good tutorial on golden grooming at the GRCA site. Should answer the basic grooming questions but agree, this is not a topic that is covered :)
 

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I have the same issue and thinning shears seems to work to take the bulk of it off. But usually just blowing it back towards the feathers usually works for the most part.
I use a rake to keep the thighs under control but if you let that grow it becomes very flowing and more manageable.

There is a really good tutorial on golden grooming at the GRCA site. Should answer the basic grooming questions but agree, this is not a topic that is covered :)
Yes that is a fantastic tutorial and basically what I have used to teach myself how to groom her, but as you say this topic is not covered! Maybe I should just let it grow and see how long it gets? I’m always trying to trim it with the thinning shears but that keeps it in a perpetual state of being at an awkward length.
 

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Hi, I am a professional groomer and you can absolutely strip that spay coat out. Its basically dead undercoat that just doesn't fall out and needs an extra tug to get it out. You can do it by hand (just grab a little bit with your thumb and index finger and yank it out) or use a stripping knife since there is so much of it and the knife will make it go a little faster (kinda hard to describe how to do it with a stripping knife, but basically hold the handle of the stripper in your hand, put it into the dog's coat kinda like a brush or comb, grab some of the hair with your thumb & index finger and hold it against the stripper blade, and yank it out). But once you get it all stripped out the first time, its just a matter of keeping up with it as it comes back so it isn't such a big project. Looking at the photo, it will take a while to get all that stripped out; so depending on how much your hands can handle and how well your dog tolerates it, you can break it up into sessions-like do one leg one day, then another leg the next day and so on. Most dogs tolerate it fine, but every once in a while you get that one dog who acts like you are killing them, lol! It doesn't actually hurt the dog at all to have that spay coat pulled out, but some dogs are just dramatic! (My own dog used to fall asleep during the process, so that tells you it doesn't hurt!) I would tell you you could take her to a groomer if you don't want to mess with it, but pet groomers who know how to do hand stripping are few and far between. I had to learn on my own because its often not something you get taught for pet grooming. Most pet groomers would probably take a clipper to it, which isn't really going to solve your problem. Unfortunately, I do not have video of the stripping process so you can see how to do it, but I do have before and after photos of a golden retriever's hind leg that I will attach.
 

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Hi, I am a professional groomer and you can absolutely strip that spay coat out. Its basically dead undercoat that just doesn't fall out and needs an extra tug to get it out. You can do it by hand (just grab a little bit with your thumb and index finger and yank it out) or use a stripping knife since there is so much of it and the knife will make it go a little faster (kinda hard to describe how to do it with a stripping knife, but basically hold the handle of the stripper in your hand, put it into the dog's coat kinda like a brush or comb, grab some of the hair with your thumb & index finger and hold it against the stripper blade, and yank it out). But once you get it all stripped out the first time, its just a matter of keeping up with it as it comes back so it isn't such a big project. Looking at the photo, it will take a while to get all that stripped out; so depending on how much your hands can handle and how well your dog tolerates it, you can break it up into sessions-like do one leg one day, then another leg the next day and so on. Most dogs tolerate it fine, but every once in a while you get that one dog who acts like you are killing them, lol! It doesn't actually hurt the dog at all to have that spay coat pulled out, but some dogs are just dramatic! (My own dog used to fall asleep during the process, so that tells you it doesn't hurt!) I would tell you you could take her to a groomer if you don't want to mess with it, but pet groomers who know how to do hand stripping are few and far between. I had to learn on my own because its often not something you get taught for pet grooming. Most pet groomers would probably take a clipper to it, which isn't really going to solve your problem. Unfortunately, I do not have video of the stripping process so you can see how to do it, but I do have before and after photos of a golden retriever's hind leg that I will attach.
Wow! What a difference that makes!
Jules
 

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Hi, I am a professional groomer and you can absolutely strip that spay coat out. Its basically dead undercoat that just doesn't fall out and needs an extra tug to get it out. You can do it by hand (just grab a little bit with your thumb and index finger and yank it out) or use a stripping knife since there is so much of it and the knife will make it go a little faster (kinda hard to describe how to do it with a stripping knife, but basically hold the handle of the stripper in your hand, put it into the dog's coat kinda like a brush or comb, grab some of the hair with your thumb & index finger and hold it against the stripper blade, and yank it out). But once you get it all stripped out the first time, its just a matter of keeping up with it as it comes back so it isn't such a big project. Looking at the photo, it will take a while to get all that stripped out; so depending on how much your hands can handle and how well your dog tolerates it, you can break it up into sessions-like do one leg one day, then another leg the next day and so on. Most dogs tolerate it fine, but every once in a while you get that one dog who acts like you are killing them, lol! It doesn't actually hurt the dog at all to have that spay coat pulled out, but some dogs are just dramatic! (My own dog used to fall asleep during the process, so that tells you it doesn't hurt!) I would tell you you could take her to a groomer if you don't want to mess with it, but pet groomers who know how to do hand stripping are few and far between. I had to learn on my own because its often not something you get taught for pet grooming. Most pet groomers would probably take a clipper to it, which isn't really going to solve your problem. Unfortunately, I do not have video of the stripping process so you can see how to do it, but I do have before and after photos of a golden retriever's hind leg that I will attach.
Thanks very much for the detailed advice! The difference in your before and after photos is amazing! This is exactly the type of advice I was hoping to get. And you’re right the groomer I have taken her to before wanted to use clippers on it which I didn’t prefer. When you say it will be easier to maintain after the first time, does it grow back in randomly? Otherwise if it all grows back in at once then it would just be shorter, but same amount of hairs to deal with, if that makes sense?
 

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I feel like if it is stripped out often, its not as much hair to deal with. I noticed on a couple dogs who came regularly for grooming that it seemed to not come back as much and got less and less as we went. On my own dog, stripping regularly made the spay coat not come back nearly as much. None of my regulars had anywhere nearly as much spay coat as your girl though, so I honestly don't know if that will make a difference. The golden in the pictures had the most spay coat I've ever done, but he only ever came to me that once, so I can't tell you how his coat turned out.
 

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I feel like if it is stripped out often, its not as much hair to deal with. I noticed on a couple dogs who came regularly for grooming that it seemed to not come back as much and got less and less as we went. On my own dog, stripping regularly made the spay coat not come back nearly as much. None of my regulars had anywhere nearly as much spay coat as your girl though, so I honestly don't know if that will make a difference. The golden in the pictures had the most spay coat I've ever done, but he only ever came to me that once, so I can't tell you how his coat turned out.
Ok that’s great to know. Thanks again!
 

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Hi, I am a professional groomer and you can absolutely strip that spay coat out. Its basically dead undercoat that just doesn't fall out and needs an extra tug to get it out. You can do it by hand (just grab a little bit with your thumb and index finger and yank it out) or use a stripping knife since there is so much of it and the knife will make it go a little faster (kinda hard to describe how to do it with a stripping knife, but basically hold the handle of the stripper in your hand, put it into the dog's coat kinda like a brush or comb, grab some of the hair with your thumb & index finger and hold it against the stripper blade, and yank it out). But once you get it all stripped out the first time, its just a matter of keeping up with it as it comes back so it isn't such a big project. Looking at the photo, it will take a while to get all that stripped out; so depending on how much your hands can handle and how well your dog tolerates it, you can break it up into sessions-like do one leg one day, then another leg the next day and so on. Most dogs tolerate it fine, but every once in a while you get that one dog who acts like you are killing them, lol! It doesn't actually hurt the dog at all to have that spay coat pulled out, but some dogs are just dramatic! (My own dog used to fall asleep during the process, so that tells you it doesn't hurt!) I would tell you you could take her to a groomer if you don't want to mess with it, but pet groomers who know how to do hand stripping are few and far between. I had to learn on my own because its often not something you get taught for pet grooming. Most pet groomers would probably take a clipper to it, which isn't really going to solve your problem. Unfortunately, I do not have video of the stripping process so you can see how to do it, but I do have before and after photos of a golden retriever's hind leg that I will attach.
:::cheeky grin::::
any chance you could post a video of YOU doing it?
::::blinking very innocently:::::
 

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I have the same issue and thinning shears seems to work to take the bulk of it off. But usually just blowing it back towards the feathers usually works for the most part.
I use a rake to keep the thighs under control but if you let that grow it becomes very flowing and more manageable.

There is a really good tutorial on golden grooming at the GRCA site. Should answer the basic grooming questions but agree, this is not a topic that is covered :)
I have been looking for the tutorial you mentioned and I just cannot seem to find it. Could you possibly post a link?
 

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:::cheeky grin::::
any chance you could post a video of YOU doing it?
::::blinking very innocently:::::
Well, I really don't have much of a clientele right now party because I am 6 months pregnant with twins (and already have a toddler!) and can't handle a whole lot, and partly because its been a really bad year for my clients. Lost one to blastomycosis, one to cancer, and my own dog to cancer. Those 3 were my most regular clients and none really had a lot of spay coat to show as they were kept up regularly. Let me see if I can find something on youtube. Ok this is a Toller, not a Golden, but its the same technique-very simple, just pull out the fluff:
 

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Well, I really don't have much of a clientele right now party because I am 6 months pregnant with twins (and already have a toddler!) and can't handle a whole lot, and partly because its been a really bad year for my clients. Lost one to blastomycosis, one to cancer, and my own dog to cancer. Those 3 were my most regular clients and none really had a lot of spay coat to show as they were kept up regularly. Let me see if I can find something on youtube. Ok this is a Toller, not a Golden, but its the same technique-very simple, just pull out the fluff:
Oh my, tuff year! I'm sorry for the loss of your pup but excited about the birth of twins! You will be having another busy year but sounds like a much more positive year ahead. Congratulations!
 

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Well, I really don't have much of a clientele right now party because I am 6 months pregnant with twins (and already have a toddler!) and can't handle a whole lot, and partly because its been a really bad year for my clients. Lost one to blastomycosis, one to cancer, and my own dog to cancer. Those 3 were my most regular clients and none really had a lot of spay coat to show as they were kept up regularly. Let me see if I can find something on youtube. Ok this is a Toller, not a Golden, but its the same technique-very simple, just pull out the fluff:
Thank you. I found it very interesting It looks, however, like most of the spay coat is essentially loose and can be pulled out. Alas, Káva's whispies are definitely attached.
 
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