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What to do when encountering coyotes??

2349 Views 86 Replies 25 Participants Last post by  Clipper's mom
I was deep into some gator conversation yesterday and bears and probably before that about cats. All that caught up with me and now I have a question about coyotes. Yes I know... always about the wildlife, why can't I just be normal? 😂🤦🏽‍♀️

We are living I would say in a nice suburban(?) area - family homes and apartments. Very quiet and residential. People are great with their dogs - we haven't had an issue. And we go out alot with Ramses since now we live in an apartment here. My husband's (Pierre-Emmanuel aka PE) colleagues told him there could be coyotes in our area. Rare but possible is what they said. But we both hadn't seen any so far. Today Ramses went out with PE and they saw a coyote. Which to be honest, in the beginning he wasn't sure if it was or not. PE decided to ask an elderly lady walking past if it was one. And she said yes it was indeed a coyote... And his follow up question was are they dangerous? She said she didn't know..

What are your thoughts on how to handle possible sightings of coyotes or what to do when they are near you? I can't really avoid this area because it's right near our apartment complex. It's where he goes to potty.. I have attached some pictures. Apologies in advance if this sounds like a silly question that you're all more experienced with. Thank you 😊

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@diane0905 - do you live in a thrill seekers' paradise at Kiawah island?😂That area is just teeming with action!



Oh no not at all - I am not insulted or offended by your comment! 😅 I thought of my mother when I read your comment and her lamenting with regret several times that us city kids are so pampered and sheltered and don't know anything! 🤣 She wished she had raised us with much more worldly experiences and life skills.. Not that it was easy for her since we were pretty much hellions ourselves (and my dad always took it easy on us) 🙈



Benji rules! 😆Benji reminds me of myself as a kid (when I didn't have any fear and responsibilities). I terrorized my poor mother several times with injuries like bloodied, broken noses (3x, it is wonderfully crooked now 🤣) and swollen bumps, bruises to my face and head. This was due to playing lacrosse for school competitively and I was not very tall compared to some others. Felt like I had a lot to prove.. Except she didn't let me do whatever I wanted (after my third broken nose, she banned me from playing lacrosse for school 🤣 and if I didn't quit and played behind her back she was going to put me in a hostel) and I can't believe you let Benji do pretty much whatever he wanted! 😂

But reading numerous times about a coyote playing with a dog to lure them is making me take it seriously. I think can't trust Ramses- he is literally the walking definition of curiosity kills the golden retriever! He listens and stays close to us. But I told him not to pick up the injured puffin back last summer (although very noble and well intentioned) and he disobeyed me twice. My golden retriever for all the good reasons (and maybe bad?) has never been aggressive. If a little chihuahua barks at him aggressively from a distance, he will respond in whines. I don't think this will go well with a coyote...



Coyote spotted in an area like this - it's residential.. Is this considered suburbs? I ask because the French definition is something entirely different....

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You guys have street signs there!! That's like the middle of the city, right? Where I live, we give directions like "Turn at the big oak stump"......
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
You guys have street signs there!! That's like the middle of the city, right? Where I live, we give directions like "Turn at the big oak stump"......
My mother has always given us directions this way! 🤣 She also draws us her own maps with road signs and monuments. She's frighteningly accurate though - Do you also do the same? 😅

I am confused as to whether its a city most probably because my English stinks. I live in Bethany but have a Portland postal code. In Wikipedia it says, "Bethany is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Washington County, Oregon, United States". I then clicked on Washington County - where Wikipedia says "Washington County is one of 36 counties in the US state of Oregon and part of the Portland metropolitan area". So I am guessing I am living in a metro? And then I clicked on that and there was a whole lot of definitions.. I said alright I am done! 🤣

*I know Wikipedia is not always an accurate source - I tell my students this all the time and I did just that! 🤣
 

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You guys have street signs there!! That's like the middle of the city, right? Where I live, we give directions like "Turn at the big oak stump"......
The county I live in has more miles of road than any other county in Iowa and there is not a single stoplight.
 

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One more coyote comment: Coyotes are predators. They aren't cute stuffed animals. At the same time, don't exaggerate the danger of coyotes. They eat mostly mice, voles, rabbits, and other small mammal prey. You shouldn't put food or food scraps out for them. If you have a small dog or a cat, you shouldn't put it outside in an unfenced area at night. You shouldn't let your dog chase coyotes. Keep your dog's vaccinations up to date. Don't try to make friends with coyotes or treat them as pets. On the other hand, if you don't want fields overrun with voles and rabbits, you need those mid-level carnivores. Be sensible and aim for a live and let live attitude is my philosophy.

If you're hiking, there are many more dangerous things than coyotes. Your fellow human beings, for example. Way more dangerous than coyotes. The most dangerous non-human animals you will encounter are ticks and mosquitoes.

(BTW, some of the "luring" behavior people describe is not to lure the dog to where it can be attacked; it is to lure dogs away from dens with coyote pups. It's the coyote version of a killdeer acting like it has a broken wing. I've seen a mother coyote do it with one of our dogs when we passed by a den where we knew there were pups.)
 

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SRW, it's very thoughtful of you to take on the heavy responsibility of protecting toddlers by shooting as many coyotes as you possibly can. Of the grand total of two known fatal coyote attacks in the US and Canada in the last 100 years, one of those was a 3-year old killed in California in 1981.

However, if you want to have an even bigger impact on protecting children from animal attacks, you should consider killing as many dogs as you can. Between 2005 and 2019, there were 24 to 48 human fatalities per year in the US caused by dog attacks, of which 12 to 20 per year were children:
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Don't forget about those deer-vehicle collisions which cause 175 to 200 human fatalities per year. Some of those fatalities are undoubtedly children.

And then there are those 1,700 to 1,800 children who die each year of abuse or neglect, of which more than 1/4 are caused by the mother acting alone.

You need to expand your noble campaign to protect toddlers to include dogs, deer, and their parents. In fact, toddlers would be much safer if there were no other living things around them. You're going to need more ammunition.
 

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SRW, it's very thoughtful of you to take on the heavy responsibility of protecting toddlers by shooting as many coyotes as you possibly can.
I appreciate that.
I posted the video because it was interesting, not to imply that coyote attacks are common.
 

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All of the discussion on coyotes reminded me of something that happened to me some time ago as a visiting nurse. I normally made friends easily with people's pets when I did home nursing visits. However at one home there was a yellow lab who was very suspicious of me and the owner was surprised at that behavior, and so was I. She finally had to put him in a bedroom and close the door.
I didn't make too much of it until a week or two later when I was getting ready to wash that winter jacket for the first time; it was the one I'd been wearing at the home visit. The laundering instructions stated that the hood should be removed before washing because it was trimmed with real fur, and that fur was coyote fur! Do you think that the lab was able to detect coyote scent from that fur trim, even though it had undergone a manufacturing process?
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
All of the discussion on coyotes reminded me of something that happened to me some time ago as a visiting nurse. I normally made friends easily with people's pets when I did home nursing visits. However at one home there was a yellow lab who was very suspicious of me and the owner was surprised at that behavior, and so was I. She finally had to put him in a bedroom and close the door.
I didn't make too much of it until a week or two later when I was getting ready to wash that winter jacket for the first time; it was the one I'd been wearing at the home visit. The laundering instructions stated that the hood should be removed before washing because it was trimmed with real fur, and that fur was coyote fur! Do you think that the lab was able to detect coyote scent from that fur trim, even though it had undergone a manufacturing process?

That lab was definitely a secret PETA member.. He disapproved of your coyote fur winter jacket - and you know how they get when you do things like that! 😂
 

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That lab was definitely a secret PETA member.. He disapproved of your coyote fur winter jacket - and you know how they get when you do things like that! 😂
That must have been it!!! Funny thing is that I don't think I've ever had a coat with any real fur on it before that. And the fur trim around that hood was not very soft, so I figured it was something artificial. Since then, I always check the labels before purchasing!
 

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All of the discussion on coyotes reminded me of something that happened to me some time ago as a visiting nurse. I normally made friends easily with people's pets when I did home nursing visits. However at one home there was a yellow lab who was very suspicious of me and the owner was surprised at that behavior, and so was I. She finally had to put him in a bedroom and close the door.
I didn't make too much of it until a week or two later when I was getting ready to wash that winter jacket for the first time; it was the one I'd been wearing at the home visit. The laundering instructions stated that the hood should be removed before washing because it was trimmed with real fur, and that fur was coyote fur! Do you think that the lab was able to detect coyote scent from that fur trim, even though it had undergone a manufacturing process?
Obviously the dog did some lab work on your coat.....you're lucky he didn't call for a cat scan as well....
 

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I'm in an area where we get coyotes way too often, middle of a midwest suburban neighborhood. Can I assume they are carrying the same diseases as domesticated dogs? This is currently something I am thinking about as I'm bringing home a pup shortly and I have to figure out the potty training logistics.
 

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I'm in an area where we get coyotes way too often, middle of a midwest suburban neighborhood. Can I assume they are carrying the same diseases as domesticated dogs? This is currently something I am thinking about as I'm bringing home a pup shortly and I have to figure out the potty training logistics.
And more. Coyotes in my area carry a dangerous parasite that can be passed through their poop. So if your pup eats coyote poop, or picks up a ball that lands in their poop, etc., they can pick it up. I don't know if that is the case for all coyotes every where. I'd talk to your vet about what your pup needs in terms of vaccines and parasite prevention.
 
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My mother has always given us directions this way! 🤣 She also draws us her own maps with road signs and monuments. She's frighteningly accurate though - Do you also do the same? 😅

I am confused as to whether its a city most probably because my English stinks. I live in Bethany but have a Portland postal code. In Wikipedia it says, "Bethany is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Washington County, Oregon, United States". I then clicked on Washington County - where Wikipedia says "Washington County is one of 36 counties in the US state of Oregon and part of the Portland metropolitan area". So I am guessing I am living in a metro? And then I clicked on that and there was a whole lot of definitions.. I said alright I am done! 🤣

*I know Wikipedia is not always an accurate source - I tell my students this all the time and I did just that! 🤣
I missed this post earlier....I would say from your description you would be considered a suburbanite. Outside the city limits but part of the greater metropolitan area if that makes sense. I draw really great stick figures so when I draw maps, they're stick maps I guess....pretty basic, not too much detail.....
 

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And more. Coyotes in my area carry a dangerous parasite that can be passed through their poop. So if your pup eats coyote poop, or picks up a ball that lands in their poop, etc., they can pick it up. I don't know if that is the case for all coyotes every where. I'd talk to your vet about what your pup needs in terms of vaccines and parasite prevention.
I kind of assumed they were disease-ridden but my department of natural resources has varying info. So I'm planning on using purchased sod until I can get vaccines up to date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
I missed this post earlier....I would say from your description you would be considered a suburbanite. Outside the city limits but part of the greater metropolitan area if that makes sense. I draw really great stick figures so when I draw maps, they're stick maps I guess....pretty basic, not too much detail.....

That's alright - thanks for the clarification regarding the definitions 😅🙏🏽 That's pretty cool regarding the maps! I can't draw maps - yes to stick figures but that's all. Drawing anything else makes me get anxiety..

@Smuckers: we have the similar thinking that they carry/transmit diseases. Good luck with your puppy and I wish you no coyote encounters 😊
 

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takeaways are
1) dont hide your dog from seeing yotes - make sure they know its not a friend and look to you for instruction
2) walk/hike with proper dog items - nylon leash (something strong, no extender leashes), harness or martingale collar, dog light
3) walk/hike with proper owner items - flashlight (if bright enough 750-1000 lumens, you can blind/disrupt a coyotes eyes so they cant see you), pepper gel, pocket knife.
4) plan what you'll do if a coyote is seen, if a coyote is approaching you, and if the unfortunate occurs and your pup is off leash and has an encounter. The latter is what most are worried about i presume. how you prepare is early off leash recall training and the use of an e-collar for complete insurance and reliability. how you react should be an appropriate response to a wild animal attempting to make a dog a meal of theirs and their packs.


I live in CA, a few minutes south of the Golden Gate bridge in SF and coyotes are a constant worry (for some owners) or just another critter to be look out for (for other owners) when in the wilderness or city parks. I knew my pup was going to be an off leash dog as I am an avid hiker, so I primarily take him hiking or to local parks where he is off leash playing with other dogs or walking with me. With this intention I knew I needed to have 100% off leash reliability and confidence in his recall because encountering a yote was inevitable. As his personality developed it was clear that playing with other dogs and being a social butterfly was what made him happier than ever and it was all he wanted to do. NO MATTER what the situation was if he saw another dog he would begin to wiggle and wine or make his move to approach if possible. *This a problem on its own but not for discussion here *

Understanding this I quickly realized he needed to learn that coyotes are not dogs and are not to be approached for play time. To my surprise, and after a few run-ins/staredowns at distance, upon his first close visual of a coyote he slowly growled and then let out his biggest and meanest (very funny when goldens pretend to be big and tough) bark. Luckily I had him in the trunk of my SUV on a leash because he was pulling on the car seat leash. I rushed the coyotes direction and yelled to scare it off and he continued to bark. Decided that wasnt the best trail head and got in the car to drive off. the coyote came back as we were backing out. He barked and growled until it was out of sight.

Next encounter was close and could have been bad if had I not been prepared or able to move fast. Keeping it short but we were surrounded at dusk by 6 coyotes on a small path in a park. 3 were clearly in front of us staring, and as they approached 3 more came from the side. I leashed him and wrapped the nylon leash around my hand so it was about 1.5-2ft long - I needed him at my side so I could remain stable in my stance and not have him pulling or lunging. Quickly grabbed the pepper gel from my backpack waterbottle side pocket (spray is useless and made sure my pocket knife was still in my jacket pocket as it should be. No rocks nearby to pick up and throw at them. I fake rushed twice and yelled. Then full sprint at the group of yotes. they were in front of my path to the car. Had to go that way. they dispersed and regrouped now where I had been standing 10 seconds prior. They gave up.
 
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