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What to do when encountering coyotes??

2631 Views 97 Replies 26 Participants Last post by  FurdogDad
I was deep into some gator conversation yesterday and bears and probably before that about cats. All that caught up with me and now I have a question about coyotes. Yes I know... always about the wildlife, why can't I just be normal? πŸ˜‚πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ

We are living I would say in a nice suburban(?) area - family homes and apartments. Very quiet and residential. People are great with their dogs - we haven't had an issue. And we go out alot with Ramses since now we live in an apartment here. My husband's (Pierre-Emmanuel aka PE) colleagues told him there could be coyotes in our area. Rare but possible is what they said. But we both hadn't seen any so far. Today Ramses went out with PE and they saw a coyote. Which to be honest, in the beginning he wasn't sure if it was or not. PE decided to ask an elderly lady walking past if it was one. And she said yes it was indeed a coyote... And his follow up question was are they dangerous? She said she didn't know..

What are your thoughts on how to handle possible sightings of coyotes or what to do when they are near you? I can't really avoid this area because it's right near our apartment complex. It's where he goes to potty.. I have attached some pictures. Apologies in advance if this sounds like a silly question that you're all more experienced with. Thank you 😊

Ecoregion Sky Plant Land lot Window
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I was deep into some gator conversation yesterday and bears and probably before that about cats. All that caught up with me and now I have a question about coyotes. Yes I know... always about the wildlife, why can't I just be normal? πŸ˜‚πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ

We are living I would say in a nice suburban(?) area - family homes and apartments. Very quiet and residential. People are great with their dogs - we haven't had an issue. And we go out alot with Ramses since now we live in an apartment here. My...
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90% of the time they run away and avoid people and dogs. 9.5% of the time they can be scared away with an air horn or something obnoxious.

.5% of the time they’re rabid, but usually it’s very very obvious when an animal has rabies.

When I lived in central Florida the coyotes NEVER came out during the day. I only saw them at night. You’re more likely to see one at night, Dawn, or dusk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the advice and an insight into their behavior. That's very helpful πŸ™πŸ½

The coyote was actually sighted pretty near a pedestrian pavement to our apartment and beside there's a field where I have seen people exercising their dogs. But there was no one today. Could be one of those very rare cases. Unlike PE, I would be hurrying in the opposite direction with Ramses in such a situation . I have always grown up and lived in a city (with exception of interaction with bears, whales, puffins and seals due to work) I can't say I am very educated in these situations. I really don't mind the laughs at my expense on that. Thanks again 😊
 

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Thank you for the advice and an insight into their behavior. That's very helpful πŸ™πŸ½

The coyote was actually sighted pretty near a pedestrian pavement to our apartment and beside there's a field where I have seen people exercising their dogs. But there was no one today. Could be one of those very rare cases. Unlike PE, I would be hurrying in the opposite direction with Ramses in such a situation . I have always grown up and lived in a city (with exception of interaction with bears, whales, puffins and seals due to work) I can't say I am very educated in these situations. I really don't mind the laughs at my expense on that. Thanks again 😊
I know in some urban and suburban areas, coyotes will scavenge from trash cans and roadkill, it’s not unusual to see them in those areas but it is a little unusual to see them in broad daylight
 

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See, preventing conflict. Idiots are the biggest reason for aggressive coyotes.

Daytime sightings are becoming more common on the west coast, at least. I would be more concerned if you were walking off leash or walking a small dog. Nevertheless, be cautious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

See, preventing conflict. Idiots are the biggest reason for aggressive coyotes.

Daytime sightings are becoming more common on the west coast, at least. I would be more concerned if you were walking off leash or walking a small dog. Nevertheless, be cautious.


See, preventing conflict. Idiots are the biggest reason for aggressive coyotes.

Daytime sightings are becoming more common on the west coast, at least. I would be more concerned if you were walking off leash or walking a small dog. Nevertheless, be cautious.

Thank you πŸ™πŸ½πŸ™πŸ½ I didn't anticipate that. I showed the pic on this website to PE - yes it was a coyote πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ I'll heed the advice listed. The apartment complex is clean and I haven't seen people doing that. I find people here to be very considerate by a wide margin. And it's clean.. Still, we will be more vigilant going forwards. Thanks again 😊
 

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So I live in a very suburban area, but near the foothills, so we get a lot of coyotes. Usually they're out at dawn and dusk, occasionally in the middle of the day because most people are at work, so it's quiet. If you see one, they generally run away from humans, but you can scream or yell or wave your arms at them to scare them off. This is called hazing, and is actually what's recommended for coyotes in my area. (they're here to eat the rabbits in people's front yards, or the edges of the park, so it's not about trash.)

The biggest issue for me, is that my golden thinks they're friendly dogs, and she wants to wag her tail and say Hi to them. I don't think a coyote would attack a golden-sized dog unprovoked, but they do go for small dogs in my area, so we keep Scout on leash if we're walking around dusk or if we see one nearby.
 

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I'm also in a suburban neighborhood (midwest) and we see coyotes regularly, but not as often in the daylight. I have a large nature preserve at the back of my property and they come into my yard when I'm not outside. I have made a habit over the years of being noisy when walking out my doors just in case they are there. I'm thankful my dogs have always ignored them because they go bonkers for deer.
 

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We seem to be coexisting with them peacefully, I do hear them at night, but never during the day here. I don't walk at dusk.

When I was housesitting in Santa Fe NM, I was told by the host, if I encounter an aggressive coyote and I quote "never-mind the dog, save yourself " !!!

Ironically, never saw on in NM but on the way home from the Airport, I saw one standing at an intersection in suburbs, I swear it looked like it was waiting for the lights to change.
 

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What are your thoughts on how to handle possible sightings of coyotes or what to do when they are near you?
I shoot them. In a city I would shoot them with something quieter.
Coyotes are predators and also scavengers. The ones you see are there for garbage and food that people leave out for them. Yes, people are that dumb. They are also preying on small animals such as rabbits or squirrels as well as cats and small dogs.
It is not likely that a lone coyote will bother a golden retriever sized dog and an adult person. Groups of coyotes will attack and kill animals as large as deer.
The danger of urban coyotes is that they get used to humans and lose their fear.

I'm guessing you don't carry a 9mm with you at all times of have a rifle or shotgun in a nearby vehicle.;)
Not meaning to make you worry too much; Just as a precaution I suggest carrying a heeling stick, cane or something similar when you are walking or airing Ramses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So I live in a very suburban area, but near the foothills, so we get a lot of coyotes. Usually they're out at dawn and dusk, occasionally in the middle of the day because most people are at work, so it's quiet. If you see one, they generally run away from humans, but you can scream or yell or wave your arms at them to scare them off. This is called hazing, and is actually what's recommended for coyotes in my area. (they're here to eat the rabbits in people's front yards, or the edges of the park, so it's not about trash.)

The biggest issue for me, is that my golden thinks they're friendly dogs, and she wants to wag her tail and say Hi to them. I don't think a coyote would attack a golden-sized dog unprovoked, but they do go for small dogs in my area, so we keep Scout on leash if we're walking around dusk or if we see one nearby.

Thank you for your reply πŸ™πŸ½πŸ™πŸ½ I feel the neighbourhood here is similar to the one back in France where we were from. But the "wildlife" (?) we encounter are not the same.. This is very helpful advice 😊

Problem with Ramses is he likes to sit and watch what a dog or a coyote in this case is doing or a favourite of his is construction and construction workers with their big machines working- and sometimes we don't want to do that but keep moving. He's on a leash but likes to butt plant/keep turning his head when he thinks something is interesting πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ. So I'll make sure to be more aware of our surroundings too.
 

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Thank you for your reply πŸ™πŸ½πŸ™πŸ½ I feel the neighbourhood here is similar to the one back in France where we were from. But the "wildlife" (?) we encounter are not the same.. This is very helpful advice 😊

Problem with Ramses is he likes to sit and watch what a dog or a coyote in this case is doing or a favourite of his is construction and construction workers with their big machines working- and sometimes we don't want to do that but keep moving. He's on a leash but likes to butt plant/keep turning his head when he thinks something is interesting πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ. So I'll make sure to be more aware of our surroundings too.
I would keep something like an air horn or some sort of heeling stick on you. Maybe pepper spray. Coyotes are considered urban pests and they are dangerous. They’re considered pests where I grew up and are hugely detrimental to a lot of domestic livestock. Just keep your distance and be smart about it and you shouldn’t have issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have made a habit over the years of being noisy when walking out my doors just in case they are there. I'm thankful my dogs have always ignored them because they go bonkers for deer.
Haha! Well Ramses decided to sit and watch it πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ so I'm not sure that is a better response - could be also because PE was taking a pic so I don't want to be overly harsh in judging him here.. I'll try the noise/hazing technique definitely.. I'm shy but will have to work on it πŸ˜…

When I was housesitting in Santa Fe NM, I was told by the host, if I encounter an aggressive coyote and I quote "never-mind the dog, save yourself " !!!

Ironically, never saw on in NM but on the way home from the Airport, I saw one standing at an intersection in suburbs, I swear it looked like it was waiting for the lights to change.
Oh that must be one very aggressive coyote! I don't know if I can do that. Will be so difficult for me but I can understand why that advice. We have heard something like this with polar bears and huskies too. I'm glad I never had to be in that situation.

The traffic lights situation has happened with monkeys in Singapore πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ they have also been seen in bus stops near my home when people are going to work πŸ˜‚
 

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I was deep into some gator conversation yesterday and bears and probably before that about cats. All that caught up with me and now I have a question about coyotes. Yes I know... always about the wildlife, why can't I just be normal? πŸ˜‚πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ

We are living I would say in a nice suburban(?) area - family homes and apartments. Very quiet and residential. People are great with their dogs - we haven't had an issue. And we go out alot with Ramses since now we live in an apartment here. My husband's (Pierre-Emmanuel aka PE) colleagues told him there could be coyotes in our area. Rare but possible is what they said. But we both hadn't seen any so far. Today Ramses went out with PE and they saw a coyote. Which to be honest, in the beginning he wasn't sure if it was or not. PE decided to ask an elderly lady walking past if it was one. And she said yes it was indeed a coyote... And his follow up question was are they dangerous? She said she didn't know..

What are your thoughts on how to handle possible sightings of coyotes or what to do when they are near you? I can't really avoid this area because it's right near our apartment complex. It's where he goes to potty.. I have attached some pictures. Apologies in advance if this sounds like a silly question that you're all more experienced with. Thank you 😊

View attachment 899500
Something less lethal that I keep during mating season is bear spray. I haven't had to use it, but like any spray, you will have to be careful not to spray your dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I shoot them. In a city I would shoot them with something quieter.
Coyotes are predators and also scavengers. The ones you see are there for garbage and food that people leave out for them. Yes, people are that dumb. They are also preying on small animals such as rabbits or squirrels as well as cats and small dogs.
It is not likely that a lone coyote will bother a golden retriever sized dog and an adult person. Groups of coyotes will attack and kill animals as large as deer.
The danger of urban coyotes is that they get used to humans and lose their fear.

I'm guessing you don't carry a 9mm with you at all times of have a rifle or shotgun in a nearby vehicle.;)
Not meaning to make you worry too much; Just as a precaution I suggest carrying a heeling stick, cane or something similar when you are walking or airing Ramses.

Hahaha thank you πŸ™πŸ½πŸ™πŸ½ I really expected the "shooting them" to be your answer! I don't want my polite suburban neighbours wondering what I'm doing with a gun. They have kids.. the poor little things might get afraid.. My licence is all in a foreign language anyway - they would probably toss it in the bin 🀣

But with all seriousness, this coyote didn't seem very bothered. It was walking around parked vehicles calmly. But away from both of them. It's Ramses I am concerned about. He's got alot of curiosity. He does like to sit and watch, quietly with something he hasn't encountered or likes to see.

Ill definitely try to find a heeling stick with me - seems like this will be very useful in another way. I can gently prod my golden in the butt with it when he decides to sit and watch the constructors here using their bulldozers or excavators. I am tired of them asking me why he's not afraid of the noises πŸ€¦πŸ½β€β™€οΈ
 

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I will 3rd the suggestion of a stout heeling stick. You want something that you can use to strike out with if necessary. Though you're more likely to need it against someone else's dog than a coyote.

In general, coyotes won't bother you or your dog. If he were smaller I'd be much more concerned. However, rabid coyotes do happen, and if they do, they will absolutely come after you and your dog. If you see a coyote acting at all odd, that is when you worry.
We have a lot of coyotes here, I live rural and packs travel through our land. They've stolen a few chickens over the years, but not much else. In fact, I stepped out of my chicken coop and literally almost ran smack into one of the little thieves with my hen in his mouth once. He just trotted away and I wished I'd remembered to bring the .22.
We did have one concerning experience though, years ago. I had a Rhodesian at the time. He was out doing his thing (he liked to patrol our land perimeters, make sure his pee marks were up to snuff etc). As I watched him, a coyote came out of the tall grass and approached him. My dog wasn't concerned (he'd seen plenty of them before) and ignored it. (He was much larger than the coyote and I don't think he felt it was even worth his time) The coyote continually tried to engage in "play like" behavior with him, frolicking, play bow type stuff. I got very concerned at that point because I'm told that coyotes will send a lone pack member out to entice an animal to play and follow them, only to have the pack ambush that animal when it does. That coyote definitely didn't get the chance to lure my dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Something less lethal that I keep during mating season is bear spray. I haven't had to use it, but like any spray, you will have to be careful not to spray your dog.
Oh dear didn't think of mating season! Thanks for pointing that out.

Will keep the air horn also in mind, pepper spray, heeling stick and of course hazing. I have to exit the apartment for pee breaks so I suppose there's a high chance I'll miss something - I'll keep the hazing in mind (like a final resort/measure)..
 

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Main thing is don't leave your dogs outside unattended.

If you are out there with the dogs - typically they won't approach and/or you will be able to call your dogs into the house before anything can happen.

We have coyotes around my house - this is because we live near a main road where the county does not pick up deer carcasses (one of my neighbors has a dead deer in his front yard and has since before Christmas - its getting down to bones thanks to wildlife eating off it). We also live within walking distance of 2 lakes, 3 ponds, and a big marshy area (basically it's all wetlands around us). This attracts geese and ducks... and coyotes especially like to eat the geese.

They do not typically interact with people - but small pets like cats or small dogs or puppies can be stolen away.

There's warnings this time of the year because it's mating season or something.

I'll be honest - I'm looking at the picture from above and unsure if it's a coyote from just the pic? Looks like a husky??? Could be the angle, but coyotes have longer tails and bigger ears? The ones I see are like big brown foxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I will 3rd the suggestion of a stout heeling stick. You want something that you can use to strike out with if necessary. Though you're more likely to need it against someone else's dog than a coyote.

In general, coyotes won't bother you or your dog. If he were smaller I'd be much more concerned. However, rabid coyotes do happen, and if they do, they will absolutely come after you and your dog. If you see a coyote acting at all odd, that is when you worry.
We have a lot of coyotes here, I live rural and packs travel through our land. They've stolen a few chickens over the years, but not much else. In fact, I stepped out of my chicken coop and literally almost ran smack into one of the little thieves with my hen in his mouth once. He just trotted away and I wished I'd remembered to bring the .22.
We did have one concerning experience though, years ago. I had a Rhodesian at the time. He was out doing his thing (he liked to patrol our land perimeters, make sure his pee marks were up to snuff etc). As I watched him, a coyote came out of the tall grass and approached him. My dog wasn't concerned (he'd seen plenty of them before) and ignored it. (He was much larger than the coyote and I don't think he felt it was even worth his time) The coyote continually tried to engage in "play like" behavior with him, frolicking, play bow type stuff. I got very concerned at that point because I'm told that coyotes will send a lone pack member out to entice an animal to play and follow them, only to have the pack ambush that animal when it does. That coyote definitely didn't get the chance to lure my dog.
I actually have to admit most people here (the ones I have crossed) are very good with their dogs. They usually try to avoid contact by taking a different path and even if their dog wants to engage they ask first. I usually try not to cross dogs I don't know (it's a habit from France) because we have had experiences where some dogs get very aggressive with him from across the road at him. Comparatively, here I would say there's more dogs out and about but no incidents. I still do that out of habit.

That's really something to know that the coyotes can engage in a play bow to draw a dog out. I'm terrified thinking of rabied coyotes. That's what crossed PE's mind - that they would attack. I'm glad your dog was smart and didn't engage with the coyote!
 

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We do see coyotes in Western, MA, and also bobcats and black bears. The coyotes I've seen look a lot scrawnier than that one. They frequently come after the neighbors chickens. I saw one once and grabbed a rake and waked it in the air while yelling to scare it off. It isn't a great sign when they are getting closer to people. Either they are rabid, or unable to find enough food. My husband was walking with our kids once and ran into a rabid looking/acting coyote, which was coming towards the kids. He yelled and grabbed a big stick and waved it around while trying to hit the coyote. The kids scurried to safety, then he managed to get away too.
 
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