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I just see dogs that are thick skulled and are trained to do X that doesn't require too much thinking on their part. :D

I love having a smarter and more sensitive dog. <B
Guess you have not watched any modern field trials in person o think that these field trial dogs are not smart or sensitive. You can watch a dog running a test and see them making decisions inthe process if you pay attention!
 

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You said:"I've always thought that the difference between a sport like field and a sport like obedience is that when you do field work with a dog, you use the traits and instincts that the dog already has and typically when the dogs are out there and they know there's birds out there, all the lights are on and gears ready to go."

In a sport like obedience, have literally had instructors tell me that it doesn't matter if I have a retriever, that I have to teach retrieves the same as if my dog was a pomeranian or a collie, because there will always be a time and situation where the dog will not "want" to go fetch a dumbbell. And basically there's no instincts for going over a jump or whatnot - everything is taught from scratch.

Ideally with a golden - they are everything and have those instincts and gears and all that. But there will always be those goldens who if you point a direction, they will come up and sniff your finger. There's goldens who KNOW there is a tennis ball in the house and they will find it immediately if you ever ask them to get it even if it's deeply buried way out of the way behind a couch and under all kinds of stuff. And there's goldens who will run past a tennis ball that's practically in plain sight repeatedly while searching for the same tennis ball. 馃ぃ And that's where training and trainability and methods you use makes up the difference.

With obedience, I am guessing the traits I really REALLY love - most of these are built up from the time the dogs were baby puppies that I brought home and also what the dogs had naturally.... it's that dog who is eagerly trying to guess the next thing I want him to do and is vibrating ready to work. I have that and LOVE IT. It's that Hermionne flinging herself out of her desk to guess the right answer attitude. <B

So imagine my eyes glazing over when I see dogs that just are not focused on their owners at all. Or if they are, it's the barest fraction of what I have and value in my dogs. I acknowledge that a huge chunk of that is foundation and conditioning. But I see that in goldens of all kinds. I do not often see it in other sporting breeds - even very well trained and high level competing ones. It's just very different.
when you do field work with a dog, you use the traits and instincts that the dog already has and typically when the dogs are out there and they know there's birds out there, all the lights are on and gears ready to go.


Do you think a dog "natural instinct is to diagonal a road, ditch, mound or piece water.....NO it is a trained response. Do you think a dog's natural instinct is to swim 200-300 years to the end of a body of water to pick up a bird that they saw fall....NO, they would rather run around it if they are not trained. Do you think it is a natural instinct to run down wind of a previously retrieved shot flyer to get a bird that is another 200 yards out...NO they need to be trained to carry the line. These trained responses are even more significant in a blind as opposed to a mark where the dog has to carry the obstacles and scents to a bird that they never even saw thrown.
 

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OK, comment for you very sensitive tempered field people going WHEEEE over there. :)

I commented lightly earlier this morning because I could not resist pecking at somebody who has claimed many times that it's FC titles or field trial accomplishments or nothing. I find that perspective to be bothersome when you consider the fact that other breeds do not have the same chips on their shoulder towards people who are trying... where they themselves never try. Do I personally care? Nope. It is not my sport or dogs that he's dismissing while propping up his own dog or whatever it is he does. :)

All dogs that I've seen in obedience are coming from breeders like Tanbark and Wynwood with some random Topbrass here or there. The dogs come from high level obedience and agility pedigrees. These are the types of dogs I see.

I have never ever seen a FC golden show up at local trials. EVER. I've been training in obedience and putting obedience titles on my dogs since the 90's. Which was a very long time ago. ;)
Partly true because there are only a handful of Fc or AFC OR FC/AFC living Goldens out there!
 

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I'm sorry - I didn't mean to imply that these are not trained dogs and the training doesn't happen. Oh gosh. >.< Just that what you may be looking for in a dog to start with might be different than what somebody might want in a different sport. I was commenting on what Anney said - and please know, I was smiling as I commented.

I'm friends with a lot of people who do field and it's horribly hot days like this (87 degrees - yuck) or rainy cold days and they are out there working with the dogs or waiting their turn. It's people like that who really made me want to give it a try even know how much they train their dogs and how well trained their dogs are.

Threads like this one, I see people so eager to jump into a fight that they don't stop to see if the other person is even fighting. I'm not. 馃ゴ
I have no beefs with people who do many or single venues with their dogs. I just have issue with people who, out of ignorance or lack of exposure, state how field dogs are wild, not very smart or all the other negative characteristics that have been assigned over time. Personally I don't have tome to do other venues and admire those that can. I would rather try my best to master one event well than to try to be a jack of all trades. I spend countless hours in rotten as well as beautiful weather and locations getting my dogs to learn to maintain high quality work. I virtually never breed my own litters but I'm thrilled to see some of our offspring from our boys go to pet, hunting, obedience and SAR homes. They adapt well!
 
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