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I have never had a dog before, and always wanted a Golden Retriever. It would be the only dog I get if I were to get one. The problem is, my Mum and Dad don't want a ' big ' dog. They would prefer if it a) Stayed small forever or b) Get a small dog like a Jack Russell.
I said it wouldn't matter the size as it grows with you and you wouldn't notice it the same. Another problem is the hair from a big dog. What is it actually like if you the dog every day? They don't want hair all over. If anyone can help me out with some information that would be great. Thanks
 

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I have never had a dog before, and always wanted a Golden Retriever. It would be the only dog I get if I were to get one. The problem is, my Mum and Dad don't want a ' big ' dog. They would prefer if it a) Stayed small forever or b) Get a small dog like a Jack Russell.
I said it wouldn't matter the size as it grows with you and you wouldn't notice it the same. Another problem is the hair from a big dog. What is it actually like if you the dog every day? They don't want hair all over. If anyone can help me out with some information that would be great. Thanks
If they want a small dog, I'm a little worried how they'll feel about an 8mo Golden Puppy. They're 55lbs+ (25kg+) of playful, exuberant, puppies that knock things over, can be crazy chewers, reach countertops, etc. Having a good trainer can help with the teenage behaviors, but if its your family's first dog, it can be quite a lot.

As Prism said, heavy coats. There is fur everywhere. Small dog breeds shed as well, but Golden hair is long and will require at least some grooming.
 

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It does not sound like a golden retriever is a good fit while you live with your parents.

Goldens are big dogs, very active (sometimes downright hyper when they've been kept in the house all day), very hairy.... and quite honestly while I love them more than any other breed, I do see people who "think" they want a golden, but don't realize how much dog they would be getting.
 

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There's more than a size difference between a Golden and a Jack Russell. They have very different personalities. I don't know that I'd recommend a JR for a novice dog owner. They are assertive to say the least and can be a bit of a challenge. They have a big dog personality in a small body. Generally speaking, a JR would need a job. They don't do "boredom" very well.

Goldens shed - it's a fact of life. There will be dog hair in your house. In my experience it's easier to deal with than Labrador hair which, although shorter, is much harder to pick up.

Getting a dog of any kind, and especially a big dog from a working breed such as the Golden Retriever, is a lifestyle choice. The dog will need to be trained - that means attending classes at a training club for many months, and practising regularly at home. If you don't train your dog, he will pull like a train on leash and is likely to be unruly in the house. Goldens weigh upwards of 60 lbs. at maturity. Believe me when I say that you don't want 60 lbs. of untrained muscle and enthusiasm in your home. And the dog will need daily exercise: not just a quick walk on leash around the block, but off-leash playtime where he can run and burn energy. He will need this every day, 365 days of the year, regardless of the weather, regardless of the demands of school or work, regardless of whether you're feeling unwell or would prefer to go out with your friends. You can't just put him in the back yard and expect him to entertain himself. Dogs don't work that way. They need human interaction.

Add to that: if you get a puppy, remember that it will take about four months to house-train him. During those four months, he's going to urinate and defecate in the house - quite a bit at first, and less as time goes on, but he won't be reliably clean until he's around six months old.

Size is actually more of a factor than you might think (I speak from experience: I live with a Golden Retriever and a Toy Poodle). You're going to need a crate for your dog. A Golden crate is big and cumbersome; a small dog crate is much easier to place in your home. Basic annual medications from the vet (heartworm and flea prevention, vaccines, etc.) cost less for small dogs because of the smaller dosage. Small dogs take less space in the car. A small dog isn't going to break furniture or lamps during indoor playtime. There will be less hair in your house from a small dog. A small dog is easier to walk on leash (being pulled by a 15 lb. dog is very different from being pulled by a 65 lb. dog). A small dog eats less and therefore costs less to feed. If you travel, some hotels only accept dogs under 20 lbs. And so on.

When you get a dog, the entire household needs to be on board, with the decision and with the choice of dog. One thing you might do is to borrow a dog for a few days, to see what it's like. For example, offer to dog-sit for a friend, acquaintance or neighbour who owns the type of dog you'd like to have. It will give you a chance to see if this is the type of lifestyle you want.

Remember that getting a dog is a 12+ year commitment. I don't know how old you are. However, you do say you're still at home with your parents. So what will happen to the dog when you leave home? Will you take him with you? If so, that means (for example) that you can't live in a college dorm; you'd have to get your own apartment, and find one that accepts dogs. If not, will your parents keep the dog? Believe me, this is a factor. My daughter is 18 and would like another agility dog, but she's leaving to go to university in 18 months' time and would have to take the dog with her. So she is currently looking at the cost of dog-friendly accommodation in the city, and is asking herself if this is the lifestyle she really wants while she's a student. It's a big decision.

Best of luck. If the dog-owning lifestyle is what you want, I hope it works out for you. Let us know how things go!
 

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Having owned other breeds all of my life (mostly Beagles), I do NOT think that a Golden is a good 1st dog. TBH..I was in total shock at just how different they can be. With that said..I survived my Golden's puppy hood (SO FAR), and so did my other dogs! :ROFLMAO:
 

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If you like the golden personality, you won't find that same personality in a Jack Russel Terrier. I used to groom at a vet clinic and in the back we referred to Jack Russels as Jack Russel Terrorists. I'm sure their are JRT owners who would agree and laugh at that, but some might get offended, so we kept those comments between employees only! And Jack Russels shed quite a bit too-only it is the shorter hair that sticks in stuff. Goldens shed a lot, but you can mostly just brush it off and go. Shorter hair sticks in everything and is a pain to deal with. If you are willing to invest in a good dog blow dryer and bath and blow dry often that will help cut down on shedding (at least monthly, but the more often the less they shed).

Goldens are puppies until they are about 2-3 years old and will behave as such. They require lots of daily exercise-more than just a leash walk around the neighborhood. It is extremely important to enroll them in a good obedience/manners class as early as possible. It is much easier to train well early and develop good manners and obedience than to train later and try to undo bad habits. Since goldens are retrievers they like to have something in their mouths-as puppies they need to learn what is and is not acceptable to have in their mouth (that includes your hands, feet, shoes, rugs, furniture, etc-many people mistakenly think they have an aggressive golden puppy because it is biting them-what they really have is a typical golden puppy that they haven't taught that hands are not to be put in mouths!). I don't know if we got blessed with good puppies or if I am a good trainer or what, but neither of my goldens were the little land shark terror puppies that many people seem to come here asking for advice on. Autumn was more difficult than April, but by no means a hard puppy. And if you do all the training and effort to make your puppy into a good dog, they turn into the most loyal and wonderful companions you could ever ask for.

BUT if the size and the hair are an issue for your family, you may need to wait and get a golden until after you are out on your own. (That said, my husband, a confirmed dog hair hater, got used to our golden's hair-I did vacuum about twice a week and kept her extremely well-groomed. She also was not allowed in the bedrooms and was allowed on only one specific couch by invitation only as that helped prevent hair on clothes. I chuckle because my dog hater husband was just as likely as me to invite her up on the couch to snuggle-goldens have a way of winning people over!)

A smaller breed with a similar personality to a golden would be a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel-they do shed though. If you want low/minimal shedding, I have seen a lot of Havanese with pretty nice temperaments-they will require daily brushing and combing to keep their long coats mat and tangle free and comfortable or else regular (every 6-8 weeks minimum) haircuts-and even then you will still have to brush at least a couple times a week between grooms if you don't want them shaved.
 

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Denver, my golden is my first dog in my adult life. He was an easy puppy and I am very grateful for that. I attribute this partially to genetics, and just overall having a really solid temperament, but also because I took all of the advice that I got here, as well as reading countless puppy and training threads, and pretty much did everything they way you are “supposed to”.

We socialized him from the very beginning with people of all ages, races and genders, children, old dogs, young dogs, and puppies. We did (and still do) obedience classes every few months. He gets off leash exercise every single day, whether it is going to work with my partner and running around the athletic campus of the college he works at, or coming to the horse barn with me to run and play with the other barn dogs. Sometimes it’s just a nice off leash walk on a trail, or a hike through the snow. We crate trained, which helped potty training, and we NEVER had an issue with him chewing on furniture, shoes etc...because we always gave him m something to chew and I also think because we are so active he was TIRED as a puppy. It is SO true that “a tired puppy is a well behaved puppy”.

Denver does shed EVERYWHERE. Right now it is especially bad because the days are getting longer and his coat is prepping for spring. We vacuum every day and there is always more hair. Bathing and blow drying helps a ton. He also is VERY much still a puppy at almost 18mos, and has “puppy brain” moments where he just gets so excited that his brain basically short circuits. 99% of the time he is very well behaved and mellow ?

Do I think golden retrievers are a poor choice for a first dog? No. Definitely not, BUT I do think people need to be well researched and prepared about all that goes into raising a puppy into the amazing dogs that you see out and about or on TV.
 

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Having owned other breeds all of my life (mostly Beagles), I do NOT think that a Golden is a good 1st dog. TBH..I was in total shock at just how different they can be. With that said..I survived my Golden's puppy hood (SO FAR), and so did my other dogs! :ROFLMAO:
This is interesting! I have a Beagle and a Golden. My Beagle is going to be 8 in Oct. She is very different than a Golden. My current Golden is my second one. The Beagle is very head strong, snarly at times towards food. Always searching for food and no where near as affectionate as Goldens. My Golden is very happy go lucky, loving and a great all around dog. I love them both but out of the two I prefer the Goldens. As for the original post, Goldens are much bigger dogs and one of the reasons I went with a Beagle the second time around was because I thought I didn't want a bigger dog in the house. My heart wanted another Golden though. The shedding, yes it's real. I vacuum just about every day and dust my floors as well washing dog blankets and bedding often. It's a lot of work but worth it. I have found regular brushing helps to keep the shedding down. If you have a picture in your head of a beautiful Golden walking down the street, know that behind that scene is a lot of time put into that dog to get it that way. They have a lot of energy in the beginning and need training. I think they are worth it though.
 

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As a golden owner, that just lost my precious boy Boomer to epilepsy, I think one member of this forum summed it up: Goldens are so special, all the rest are just dogs.
 

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This is interesting! I have a Beagle and a Golden. My Beagle is going to be 8 in Oct. She is very different than a Golden. My current Golden is my second one. The Beagle is very head strong, snarly at times towards food. Always searching for food and no where near as affectionate as Goldens. My Golden is very happy go lucky, loving and a great all around dog. I love them both but out of the two I prefer the Goldens. As for the original post, Goldens are much bigger dogs and one of the reasons I went with a Beagle the second time around was because I thought I didn't want a bigger dog in the house. My heart wanted another Golden though. The shedding, yes it's real. I vacuum just about every day and dust my floors as well washing dog blankets and bedding often. It's a lot of work but worth it. I have found regular brushing helps to keep the shedding down. If you have a picture in your head of a beautiful Golden walking down the street, know that behind that scene is a lot of time put into that dog to get it that way. They have a lot of energy in the beginning and need training. I think they are worth it though.
Yep..and when a Beagle puts their nose down..there is no distracting them, from the "hunt".

My Golden (10 months old now) has a new adventure..Digging a hole half way to China and surely believes that there is something down there worth getting at (NOT.)

My Lab/Border Collie, has checked it out, and she is another with a great sniffer. NOTHING down there.?

This gal now puts one paw in the community water dish (arghhh) while drinking. I checked with my friends that gifted her to me..her mama does the same thing!


I have the cross, a LONG haired Aussie, and the Golden. Overnight the fuzzballs have taken on a decidedly golden colored tint, not to mention the ever increasing amount either.
Finally she stopped running from the pin brush and loves it..Now to attempt the slicker!:unsure:

He was my toughest, until the Golden.
ALL dogs are special creatures..not just Goldens!
870062
 

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goldens DO get big and noticeably so... the fact that they like to stick with you all the time makes it even more apparent- sometimes they form golden road blocks or you trip over them if they stand too close haha! mine don't really understand the concept of personal space.

i have 2 goldens + 1 chihuahua, and like others have said, small dogs are significantly cheaper to feed, walk + they shed an unnoticeable amount compared to my goldens.

Goldens shed.. ALOT. we vacuum twice a day at least and there are STILL dust-bunnies rolling around my house, it's actually a miracle my goldens still have so much fur on their body with the amount they shed.

i do think goldens make great 1st dogs if you are prepared. they are highly easy to train, smart & eager to please but they can be very very mouthy as puppies.

I'd recommend sitting down with your parents, and really discussing this. also, make sure you can commit to a dog fully for their entire lifespan- if you are young & have a social life, you have to be willing to sacrifice that. want to go out with your friends? you have to head home and feed & walk your dog first etc. costs add up as well for a larger breed like a golden so make sure you are prepared!
 

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Your whole family would have to be on board to get a Golden. They are people oriented dogs, and I would worry that your parents would want to close him in a room to avoid the shedding, the energy, etc. Not good.

I would put off a Golden until you are an adult out on your own.

Others have mentioned - King Charles Cavalier spaniels: small, sweet as pie, but they do shed. If the shedding is a big thing, look to the Havanese also mentioned above, or a Coton de Tulier, or any number of other small, non-shedding breeds. But do not expect a Golden in a small body. They are all very different breeds. Research them before you jump in. Small dogs tend to be yappy or barky - is that going to be an issue for your parents?
 

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Yep..and when a Beagle puts their nose down..there is no distracting them, from the "hunt".

My Golden (10 months old now) has a new adventure..Digging a hole half way to China and surely believes that there is something down there worth getting at (NOT.)

My Lab/Border Collie, has checked it out, and she is another with a great sniffer. NOTHING down there.?

This gal now puts one paw in the community water dish (arghhh) while drinking. I checked with my friends that gifted her to me..her mama does the same thing!


I have the cross, a LONG haired Aussie, and the Golden. Overnight the fuzzballs have taken on a decidedly golden colored tint, not to mention the ever increasing amount either.
Finally she stopped running from the pin brush and loves it..Now to attempt the slicker!:unsure:

He was my toughest, until the Golden.
ALL dogs are special creatures..not just Goldens!
View attachment 870062
Awww so cute! Those ears! Yes I agree all dogs are special. Here are my crazy two.
 

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I don’t think there’s much I can add as these other posts sum it up pretty well.

I’d recommend a Miniature or Toy Poodle. They’re crazy smart and they don’t shed at all! Though they do need to go to the groomers every once in a while to get their coat clipped.
I know that you’re pretty set on a Golden but you should only get a dog that your entire family is OK with.
I’d also recommend a trip to your local animal pound. There are plenty of small, quiet, and non shedding dogs that need homes. Shelter dogs don’t cost much to adopt either.
 

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I have never had a dog before, and always wanted a Golden Retriever. It would be the only dog I get if I were to get one. The problem is, my Mum and Dad don't want a ' big ' dog. They would prefer if it a) Stayed small forever or b) Get a small dog like a Jack Russell.
I said it wouldn't matter the size as it grows with you and you wouldn't notice it the same. Another problem is the hair from a big dog. What is it actually like if you the dog every day? They don't want hair all over. If anyone can help me out with some information that would be great. Thanks
Golden’s are the best! I actually find that they are usually easier to take care of than a little dog and generally more easy going. The hair isn’t a big deal if you brush your dog a few times a week. They are totally worth it, and you and your family will fall in love. Just make sure you go to a reputable breeder (preferably breeder of merit) to ensure health clearances and good temperament. Backyard breeders often produce dogs with behavioral and health issues (not always, but better safe than sorry).
 

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This is what it is like :) In all fairness, Maggie is having her first heat and this is the first time she has blown her coat. I am prepared to experience this twice a year from what I hear. This is the 2nd day of brushing like this and I bathed her about about 2 weeks ago. She will get another bath this weekend and high powered blow dry. Best dog I have ever had! :)
Jules
 

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