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Field bred is generally Goldens that are bred for hunting and/or field trial competition. They ususally are smaller, lighter build and their coat may not be as full as the show Goldens, and often are the darker colors, gold or red, though not always.

A Golden is a Golden and should always meet the breed standard though.
 

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I consider a field bred Golden one who has one or both parents titled in a field endeavor, or "starred"-and I include the higher levels of hunt test in my definition of field bred.

A lot of people use it to describe a physical type-usually lanky, darker in color, narrower head, less full coat, etc.-but that is not really correct, as there are many very sturdy field dogs with very nice heads, etc.
 

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I consider a field bred Golden one who has one or both parents titled in a field endeavor, or "starred"-and I include the higher levels of hunt test in my definition of field bred.

A lot of people use it to describe a physical type-usually lanky, darker in color, narrower head, less full coat, etc.-but that is not really correct, as there are many very sturdy field dogs with very nice heads, etc.
Hey now! I think that my Danny has a very nice head, and it's narrow.

I think field lines tend to have a less full coat, a little longer tail and legs and narrower heads. That doesn't mean that they are actually field goldens, just field line.

A conformation golden isn't necessarily good for the ring even with a "nice" head. But they are, in a general description, more solid, fluffier coat and square headed.

Of course, this is all my opinion from what I have observed....
 

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Uh oh! this is a sensitive subject for some people. As some responses have already stated, a stereotypical field line Golden tends to be of lighter build, darker color and rounder, narrower heads. They also tend to have higher energy levels. As the name suggests, they're bred primarily for hunting, rather than being shown in the conformation ring.

Alternatively, conformation lines are bulkier, have fuller coats and are lighter in color (generally). Some people think they're slightly less active than field line dogs. The emphasis is sometimes placed more on conformation than working ability.

Of course a dog can come from both conformation and field lines. It's just that some people prefer one type over the other.

No offense intended to anyone in this reply. My dogs are from what would be referred to as field lines but I love all Goldens!
 

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An Outstanding Field Golden below:)
View attachment 64099

Actually its just Tuff Dog "out standing" in the field.
He thinks that's his bloodline though;)

Sorry I am obviously of no help to ya:)
LOL. You are too funny!

By the way, I really wasn't offended by Tahnee's response. I have a dog who originally came from a shelter who was 5 months old and in congestive heart failure. I think he is as gorgeous as can be even with his narrow head. But I don't fool myself into thinking he is a well bred dog.

Danny, he's on the left.
 

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I tend to think of the darker (red), smaller goldens when it comes to field lines. We met a beautiful field bred golden at a Dock Dogs event this summer and I was amazed by how much smaller she was than Tucker and the other Goldens that were there. She was quite a bit shorter and had a much shorter and wavier red coat. She was a great dock diver!
 

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I was reading a thread that has me wondering the difference btwn a field bred GR and a GR?

TIA!
There is more difference on the inside than there is on the outside.

Many people are used to seeing the "Conformation Bred" dog. Conformation Bred dogs are bred because of accomplishments demonstrated in the Conformation Ring. A "Field Bred" dog is just that, bred because of abilities and accomplishments demonstrated in the field. The dogs have somewhat different appearances but the pedigree is where you will see the most obvious differences.


Here are some sample field bred dogs common to many of todays' field bred pedigrees


http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n251/topbrassjm/rugbynew.jpg Rugby

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n251/topbrassjm/beaugeste-1.jpg Beau

http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k84/pinerungold/Kiowa2withpheasant.jpg Kiowa II
 

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I consider my dog Finn to be a field bred dog because his parents and grandparents devote their retrieving lives to working in the field, attaining titles like Master Hunter, Senior Hunter and WCX. However, he in not a field bred dog to the Nth degree because his pedigree does not contain FC or AFC or FDHF. My dog Tango does have 50 percent of a field bred pedigree with FC, and ** but also 50 percent of a show background with CH and BOS, and BISS. Because of that combo, I think of her as a "dual bred" golden. My dog Tally I think of as a show bred golden because both of his parents are American Champions and his grandparents are SDHF, but they do not have even one performance/field title in about 4 generations! He has a great work ethic but is not a high caliber athlete. Secondary to all this are the way the dogs look in relationship to the stereotypes. They happen to relate to the generalities. Tally has lots of bone, a flowing blonde coat, and a big blocky head; Finn has a red wash and wear coat that isnt show ring quality, great angulation in the rear end, and is a crackerjack athlete. Finn is 4 lbs heavier than Tally though.
 

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Griff's a Muffin Thief!
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Easy difference - Fieldies are the Athletes - Conformation are the couch potatoes! :p:
 

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Old Gold is the Best Gold
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A field "type" could be any lighter built, red colored Golden. That to me would just mean the dog LOOKS that type.

A true field dog, I agree, has field lines behind him, titled parents or grandparents, and is of those bloodlines.
 

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So if you "raise" them to suceed in the agility, field competitions, etc you are "creating" a field GR. They are proving themselves in other words?

Either way, they are all lovely and ideal in our eyes.
 

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So if you "raise" them to suceed in the agility, field competitions, etc you are "creating" a field GR. They are proving themselves in other words?

Either way, they are all lovely and ideal in our eyes.
Not exactly.

Training can enhance some abilities but the raw materials have to be there to begin with. If you have a dog that can't mark or lacks sufficient desire for field work, you're not going to have a superior worker no matter how much training you put into the dog.

The raw materials have to be there to achieve a pleasing result.
 

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A lot of the stereotypes about what makes a "field" Golden or a "conformation" Golden don't pan out with individual dogs (just like all stereotypes).

A dog is field bred when the breeder is aiming for success in field competitions over multiple generations. A dog is conformation bred when the breeder is aiming for success in the conformation ring over multiple generations. Both groups make a mistake when they forget the other. A dog who can win in the ring but can't retrieve worth a **** isn't much of a Golden Retriever. A dog who can compete with Chessies and Labs at the national level but is ten pounds under standard, narrow, and lacks proper head shape isn't really a credit to the breed either.

The dogs I admire are excellent examples of the standard and have substantial working ability. I love to see some of both in a pedigree. A dog who can win a Ch and compete seriously in the field (or obedience or agility) is a Golden that tugs at my heart.
 

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Where The Bitches Rule
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I was reading a thread that has me wondering the difference btwn a field bred GR and a GR?

TIA!

Well as you can see by now there is no single way to answer your question. The problem being that those that have replied do not know in what context you ask your seemingly simple question. A "field bred" golden is many different things to many different people.
A dog from a pedigree of primarily highly accomplished "field" ancestors could be a considered a field bred golden.
A dog from a pedigree of good hunting lines could be considered a field bred golden.
However there are those that use the term "field golden" to describe a dog that is undersized, "red", finer boned, shorter coat. They are using the term to describe a dog of no particualar pedigree background, but just by physical traits. Really has nothing to do with any "field" traits.
So there you have another view.
 

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just wondering about your black labrador?

Hey now! I think that my Danny has a very nice head, and it's narrow.

I think field lines tend to have a less full coat, a little longer tail and legs and narrower heads. That doesn't mean that they are actually field goldens, just field line.

A conformation golden isn't necessarily good for the ring even with a "nice" head. But they are, in a general description, more solid, fluffier coat and square headed.

Of course, this is all my opinion from what I have observed....
hello, Just wondered if your black lab was a mixed breed or not? It looks exactly like the old original landrace breed that originated out of Newfoundland and Labrador. The markings of white in the chest,feet and muzzle are exact!! They say that the St johns waterdog is the ancestor to the modern labrador and most other retriever dogs of today. The last dogs known had gone extinct in the 1970s and 80s. Im trying to prove that the breed still lives on, we had one as kids growing up in northeastern ontario during the 70s and 80s. If you are interested in the litterature on the St Johns Waterdog, look it up in wikipedia. There is a whole write up with old photos from the late 1800s and to the 1970's. You dog looks soo much like one that its scary. let me know what you think and get back to me. They say that some litters out of purbred labrador stock, pups will get white markings in these areas. Just curious if your dog was a mix and of what? thankyou Colin
 

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Hey now! I think that my Danny has a very nice head, and it's narrow.

I think field lines tend to have a less full coat, a little longer tail and legs and narrower heads. That doesn't mean that they are actually field goldens, just field line.

A conformation golden isn't necessarily good for the ring even with a "nice" head. But they are, in a general description, more solid, fluffier coat and square headed.

Of course, this is all my opinion from what I have observed....
This a photo of the old St Johns waterdog , your dog is the exact same in looks.
 
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