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What brush do you use?

1449 Views 31 Replies 10 Participants Last post by  GoldenRetieverL0ver08
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My golden retriever is about 1 1/2 years old and she is shedding badly. Im brushing her daily giving her a bath every 2-3 weeks. I have a 2 sided brush with pins and bristles. I have 2 types of undercoat rake one is a safari one is a pin like. I have a rubber one that a local groomer recommended. And i have one that goes on your hand. What brushes would your reccomend? And is this brush safe?
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Don't flame me for paying $75 for a brush, but I love this brush. It seems to grip the hair better than any other one I've used, and even works well on my short haired lab mix slicker brush
 

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Don't flame me for paying $75 for a brush, but I love this brush. It seems to grip the hair better than any other one I've used, and even works well on my short haired lab mix slicker brush
Don't flame me for paying $75 for a brush, but I love this brush. It seems to grip the hair better than any other one I've used, and even works well on my short haired lab mix slicker brush
Absolutely no shade! The CC line of quotes is so well established and reputable amongst professionals.
 

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Brushing frequency varies according to breed. Short-haired dogs such as Dalmatians do not require daily brushing, so it’s fine to do that once a week or every other week. Long-haired breeds, such as Golden Retrievers and Great Pyrenees, must be brushed daily to prevent mat formation.

Matted hair is bad news for any dog. A mat acts as a storage space for twigs, leaves, or dirt – all the things that cause an itch. As a result of the pain as well as irritability, your dog may begin to bite the irritated area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Brushing frequency varies according to breed. Short-haired dogs such as Dalmatians do not require daily brushing, so it’s fine to do that once a week or every other week. Long-haired breeds, such as Golden Retrievers and Great Pyrenees, must be brushed daily to prevent mat formation.

Matted hair is bad news for any dog. A mat acts as a storage space for twigs, leaves, or dirt – all the things that cause an itch. As a result of the pain as well as irritability, your dog may begin to bite the irritated area. Read more complete grooming guide. I hope it will help.
I brush her everyday. And i make sure there are not any mats. I will look at the complete grooming guide thanks.
 

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I just buy the $14 slicker from Petco (Four Paws). Works just fine. ;)

Metal greyhound comb (fine to coarse) is another must need.
I'm with Kate. Just buy a cheap brush. I think I paid $3 for my favorite slicker brush.
 

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Brushing frequency varies according to breed. Short-haired dogs such as Dalmatians do not require daily brushing, so it’s fine to do that once a week or every other week. Long-haired breeds, such as Golden Retrievers and Great Pyrenees, must be brushed daily to prevent mat formation.

Matted hair is bad news for any dog. A mat acts as a storage space for twigs, leaves, or dirt – all the things that cause an itch. As a result of the pain as well as irritability, your dog may begin to bite the irritated area. Read more complete grooming guide. I hope it will help.
I'm gonna be a brat and say if your dog has a correct coat, he will NOT be prone to matting unless he has gone months (includes periods of big sheds) without being brushed, bathed, anything. You are then talking about not just matts, but also hot spots.

I never randomly brush my dogs unless they pick up burrs outside.
 

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Don't flame me for paying $75 for a brush, but I love this brush. It seems to grip the hair better than any other one I've used, and even works well on my short haired lab mix slicker brush
You won't catch me doing any price-shaming for grooming equipment. I bought all my equipment when I had standard poodles. (mucho $$$$) Thanks for the link. It's been years since I bought a new slicker brush. My old ones are getting worn with too many bent pins. I disagree about cheap brushes. I like quality brushes.

As for grooming frequency, mine go on the grooming table once a week for a brush, a quick toenail grind, an ear check, and a tooth check. In late summer and fall, I check between toes for those sneaky grass seeds. The best defense against dangerous grasses is to keep them out of areas with dangerous grasses, but it pays to be vigilant. If I smell the tell-tale odor of conifer sap, I look for it right away. We have a yard full of conifer trees. Cold cream works well to soften and remove sap; peanut butter works in a pinch.
 

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I'm gonna be a brat and say if your dog has a correct coat, he will NOT be prone to matting unless he has gone months (includes periods of big sheds) without being brushed, bathed, anything. You are then talking about not just matts, but also hot spots.

I never randomly brush my dogs unless they pick up burrs outside.
I also notice that intact dogs mat way less than altered dogs. Mine has never had a mat in her life, while my last golden matted all the time. I also am super lazy with brushing and it is not uncommon to go a few weeks without a brush touching my dog. But no mats.
 

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You won't catch me doing any price-shaming for grooming equipment. I bought all my equipment when I had standard poodles. (mucho $$$$) Thanks for the link. It's been years since I bought a new slicker brush. My old ones are getting worn with too many bent pins. I disagree about cheap brushes. I like quality brushes.

As for grooming frequency, mine go on the grooming table once a week for a brush, a quick toenail grind, an ear check, and a tooth check. In late summer and fall, I check between toes for those sneaky grass seeds. The best defense against dangerous grasses is to keep them out of areas with dangerous grasses, but it pays to be vigilant. If I smell the tell-tale odor of conifer sap, I look for it right away. We have a yard full of conifer trees. Cold cream works well to soften and remove sap; peanut butter works in a pinch.
My groomer has it and I used it and really liked it so I bought one for myself. No regrets. It's nice to hold, and really gets all the way down to the skin. And it feels nice. I tried it out on my own head lol.
 

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I'm gonna be a brat and say if your dog has a correct coat, he will NOT be prone to matting unless he has gone months (includes periods of big sheds) without being brushed, bathed, anything. You are then talking about not just matts, but also hot spots.

I never randomly brush my dogs unless they pick up burrs outside.
Same. Only if they've rolled in the dirt and the night before a trial weekend. Correct coats don't mat. I do check my girl for mats. Spaying ruins that perfect coat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm gonna be a brat and say if your dog has a correct coat, he will NOT be prone to matting unless he has gone months (includes periods of big sheds) without being brushed, bathed, anything. You are then talking about not just matts, but also hot spots.

I never randomly brush my dogs unless they pick up burrs outside.
My girl hasnt gotten a matt once. Its just the time of season and shes shedding a lot.
 
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