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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to do everything right raising Gable but I am getting to my wits end. Here are the positives:
1. He sleeps all night without crying and without having an accident.
2. He rarely has an accident in the house. It is usually when he is playing and he just stops to pee.
3. He has learned to sit on command.

Now, the thing that is sending me over the edge is the last few hours of the night. There are the longest of the day. Even though he nips during the day, in the evening it turns into biting and almost as if he is angry. There is no controlling him. The more I try to calm him down the more he gets agitated. He does the zoomies, shakes his toys really hard and then lunges and tries to bite.
When he goes into his crate for the night, he just looks sweet and lays down and goes to sleep.
I have given him time outs in the kitchen that is gated when he gets out of control. I don't say bad dog I just put him in there. Is that the wrong thing to do?
Any suggestions? He begins training this coming Tuesday. He is being trained at home.
 

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Sounds pretty normal to me. It does sound like you are doing things correctly. My pups always had some pretty crazy times right before bed time. The only thing I would suggest is make sure he is getting outside and playing hard during the day. Hang in there it does get better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It has been really hard as we have gotten over a foot of snow and he can barely get through it. I try to walk him as much as I can but the weather has not been in my favor.
 

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We call 9:00 the witching hour at our house. Bogey always goes crazy around then. My parents' dogs do the same thing at their house. I think they just get a burst of energy at night. Once Gable learns what things are and are not acceptable to mouth it should get easier, and only you can decide what the rules in your house are, but I wouldn't be too worried about it. It is nice for them to get some energy out before they go to sleep.

If he seems to be alert and in a good place to work, try using the time to play some games. As he gets more into training, you can use the time for some fun work and really stimulate his puppy mind. Practice happy recalls/comes, play hide and seek, use the time to play gently with his feet and ears to get him used to being touched.

You might also try making him work for his dinner earlier in the evening so that he uses up some energy earlier. I would hesitate to treat or feed right before bed, especially with a young puppy, but maybe working for dinner from a Kong or treat ball would be a good idea.

Best of luck to you! It sounds like you have already made some great progress!
 

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I am not an expert - but I am an excellent parent and have learned over the years how to read children very well. I apply the same skills with raising puppies.

Even if there is a lot of snow, you have to try to get out with Gable. Not only is he getting fresh air and exercise outdoors, he is smelling, seeing people, and hearing different noises. I have had a golden puppy here for the last three winters. I invested in snow bibs (Cabellas), great boots (Target), and a heavy down coat. Thats my outfit - first thing in the morning, I put it on, they go potty in our yard, and off we go. I've trained them to go potty before we go, so we are not zig zagging down the street. Get that out of the way - soon enough Gable will learn - we are not leaving until that is done.

I have fallen on my butt with three dogs looking at me because of the ice and I have had neighborhood dogs charge out at us as we walk by with those darn electronic fences - but if they are getting exercise and fresh air on a regular basis, its no big deal for them. I can trust their behavior.

I wasn't always as this way - I made huge mistakes with our other dogs in my lifetime - they were not my priority - they couldn't be. That makes a difference, too. When I discovered that exercise and fresh air was the answer, before even eating, I felt really dumb. It was so obvious.

So - you've got a great pup there - wow - and I know he is young - but he probably could use even 20 minutes sniffing around in the yard or just a walk around the block - even if you have to carry him part of the way : )

I walk three Golden retrievers for an hour and 15 minutes (minimum) every day. That is five miles at the pace we go. I have lost 26 pounds from my pre-Golden days.

Other thoughts - be very careful of the jumping and rough-housing. Gate the stairs off. In no time he'll learn how to fly up and down those. You don't want him to get hurt.

On the nipping - I used a bully stick as a diversion. I allowed all three of my pups to taste my hands, and my fingers were often right next to their mouths as they chewed. I also rubbed their gums with my fingers. You could feel the teeth coming in. It just made sense - and it worked. None of them have ever bitten me or anyone else. The nipping stopped. Today I can take anything out of their mouths, I can slip a pill in if I need to, and the vet can easily examine them. They have had my hands all inside their mouths - my fingers are not strange to them - they know good things come from my hands. I regularly clean and massage their ears. This way the vet can examine them with no problems too - they love having their ears rubbed - it relaxes them - they all get their turn.

Just some ideas - I was touched once by someone who wrote on this forum that when their Golden became elderly and could no longer walk easily, they used to take him for car rides so he was able to get out. To me, that is such love and commitment. I never forgot that. So everyday - I'm out there - I look like a hobo in my outfit - sometimes I have mud on me, sometimes I am drenched from the rain - but I do it for them. The payback is the smile as they breathe in the fresh air - you know it when you see it. The payback is the wagging tail as they go past a familiar house that has a dog barking or they see a school bus with children getting on board. All regular life things that make their day.

Hope this helps : )
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I didn't mean to mislead that I was not taking him out. We do go out in the backyard and we go for walks. He is the one ready to come back in before me. I am trying to keep him outside as I know that exercise is the key. I have boots, coat and a fleece hood to keep me warm.
I keep his rawhide chew with me when he starts nipping/biting and replace my hand with the bone. I think I am expecting too much too quickly. I keep saying to myself that he is still a puppy and wants to play.
Thank you for the help. I keep wanting to check to make sure that I am trying to do the right things.
 

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I come on strong, don't I? I've got to watch that : )

Its hard work - I remember last winter picking Gracie up and putting her down and picking her up and putting her down in sub-zero temperatures while my daughter and I walked all three of them. They do get cold - I would wrap her paws in my scarf and warm her up and then she would twist and want back down and would continue walking with us.

It is a daily challenge still - I know - but of all breeds, I don't think Goldens can help it when they start raising a ruckus. I always think - okay - we need to get out and walk or do something that is fun - like throw a ball in the basement or play on the floor. Some days they need it more than others.

I can tell from every one of your posts that you really care. It will get easier - you will be able to read Gable and communicate as you spend time together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I thank you for all your feedback. Sometimes it just helps to know that someone else has gone through the same things. My first reactions is always "This is only happening to me. I must be doing something wrong!!" Hearing that others have gone through it helps. I will continue to come back for advice and solace.
Well, we are off for a walk.
Thanks
 

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My Payton is the same way. When she gets real crazy she attacks, lunges at my hands, legs, stomach, or any other part of my body that she can get access too. Trying to put a toy in her mouth instead doesn't work. We usually try to get her outside then so she can run off some of the energy. Everyone keeps telling me it will get better so I'm patiently waiting!
 

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Josie is the same way in the evening! I usually try to put her in her crate from 5-6:30 or so, and get through the craziness of cooking dinner, homework, baths, etc. She is sometimes calmer if she misses all that, but not always. If I can catch it early enough, I'll take her out and just run back and forth and get it all out. We've had some snow lately too and it is much harder (She gets tired of being cold and the snow sticking to her , and practically drags me back in the house). If all else fails, I put her to bed early. She is usually out for the night by 7:30 or 8 anyway (and she sleeps until 6am). I'll be really happy when we get a handle on the biting, though, it really hurts!! It is reassuring to know we are all going through the same things, though!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That is exactly what Gable does. He just starts jumping at us and biting. I liken it to the toddler that is over tired and just wants to try and stay awake. Some nights are better than others. Gable goes to bed around 10 and sleeps until 6. How old is Josie?
 

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That's so, so normal. They get tired, but they're still wound up and excited about how interesting the world is, so they get bratty and confused. Comet would act like that for an hour around 6, and then he'd turn into a dead dog at 7 or 8. He'd pass out and would not wake up for anything.

You're not going to make a lot of progress with the training at those times, but keep at it anyway. Patiently show the pup that biting you makes you quiet, boring, and still as a statue. Then waggle a toy. Show him that biting the toy instead brings you back to life and makes things fun.

If you can teach him this basic principle during the good times and during the evil evening puppy times, he should "get it" in a few weeks or less. If you're truly religious and all family members are consistent, he might grasp it in a matter of days.

When the dog is in an unproductive emotional state, don't give up on training, but set your expectations differently. It takes a ton of patience, but small progress when the dog is "off" can still be helpful in ironing out basics.
 

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That is exactly what Gable does. He just starts jumping at us and biting. I liken it to the toddler that is over tired and just wants to try and stay awake. Some nights are better than others. Gable goes to bed around 10 and sleeps until 6. How old is Josie?
Josie is 3 months old (almost 14 weeks). Its exactly like an overtired toddler! That's why I just figure she needs to be put to bed. I know my kids NEVER want to go to bed, no matter how tired they are, so she must feel the same way. When she goes in the crate and lies down, you can almost see her sigh in relief - Finally, mom figured it out!
 

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Over the past few months I have noticed something fairly common among those of us going through "puppy hell". We seem to reach a pinnacle of frustration somewhere around 13-15 weeks. At this time it just seems as we've all had enough of the out of control bratty puppy stuff. At 11 weeks you may just be going through it a bit early, but hang in there. Over the next month or so, things are going to start getting better. The first sign of good things to come is when Gable starts losing his shark teeth. That should start happening in the next couple of weeks at around 14 or 15 weeks. From there you begin to see little improvements...it doesn't happen all at once....but it does happen. By the end of February I think you will find that the worst of the worst is behind you and you will start seeing the tazmanian devil disappear and a wonderful golden beginning to emerge.

You are probably doing everything right. Just keep doing it and hang in there. Everything will come together and all of the hell you are going through now will pay off. Believe it or not in a another 9 months you are going to wonder where all those wonderful puppy days went....
 

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Charlie is a little over a year and still has her evil hour in the evening no matter how much exercise she has had during the day. It's like she is over tired and doesn't know what to do with herself. I started clicker training with her so we do a little session every evening and that seems to help settle her down. Next thing you know she is fast asleep.
 

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It's all very fresh in my head when Daisy was just a tiny baby (Just a bigger baby now lol).

But it does get easier, though you think it will never end, slowly it does.

Daisy would constantly bite and growl at my trousers, bite our toes and hands and she would bite those little shark teeth so hard into our hands that we would bleed on many occassions. But with 'constant' training and putting her toys in her mouth replacing our hands, 'Finally' she learnt. But for months all you ever heard in our house was 'Leave', 'No', 'Leave' 'Get Down' 'Leave' and lots of ouch's from us and we thought it would never end!!

I also took her for several very short walks every day and night which did help a lot, and she always seemed to be at her most hyper at night time. She also seemed to have a built in rota based on 3 hours - slept for 3 hours, awake and crazy for 3 hours.

But I'm pleased to say, now as she's approaching 6 months old, she has settled down amazingly and I'm putting a lot of that down to the fact she has virtually finished teething - Hurrah!!!

Their teething must be quite painful for them, so lots of soft toys specifically for puppies and icy puppy chews out the freezer are a great help, but alternate them all on a daily basis, they get very bored very quick as you must be finding out by now.
 

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When you start your puppy class, you will see more improvement. Mine were so mentally worn out after class.

Gosh, that Gable is one really handsome pup : )
 

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I'll join the club! Duffy (13 weeks) gets crazy in the early evening after dinner. Sometimes we just take him for a quick walk around the block. That definitely settles him down right away. He zonks out as soon as we come inside. The weather is going to get really cold here - single digits are forecast - so I won't be able to do this on the bad days.

I have a heart condition, so I can't brave the extreme cold. On days like that, we let him run around in the yard with Teddy in the early evening. They usually don't stay out too long when its that cold, but they do get a short romp in.

And, guess what -- the biting is definitely toning down a LOT. I'm so glad. I can actually pet my guy without him attacking my hand and chomping down. The worst is when he gets his fang in my palm....ooowwwww....and won't let go!

Kris
 
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