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Eric - pro plan sport 30/20 is AAFCO approved for the growth of large breed puppies (70 pounds or more as an adult) per the Purina website. The Calcium content is 1.0% and the Phosphorus is 0.9%, making that a 1:1 Ca : P ratio. What's wrong with that?

I can't speak to the 30/20 protein/fat content, but I know I fed Kaizer a 26/16 all life stages food and he does not have joint issues.
 
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The calcium and phos may be ok but there is no way a 30/20 is ideal or generally safe for a large breed puppy. Plus the vitamin and mineral balance are for an adult dog, not a puppy. You only feed more or less of the salsa ratios. Also, it is an all life stage food with means be definition, it has to meet the requirements for the small breed puppy with us significant more then the large breed puppy.

Plus that food is for a working dog that is in the field for 4-6 hours. There is no way a puppy 8, 10, 16 weeks of age will ever need that much extra.

Also the definition of large breed puppy is 50lbs and above, giant breed is 100lbs and above.

You were feeding a food that was at the to end of protein and fat for a large breed puppy. 30/20 is on the extreme. Plus it's not 100% you will get joint issues but certainly you increase the chance a good bit. It would be better to feed an adult food than an all life stage food.
The AAFCO statement on the Pro Plan 30/20 bag says "Animal feeding tests using AAFCO procedures substantiate that Pro Plan Sport Performance 30/20 Formula provides complete and balanced nutrition for all life stages of dogs including growth of large size dogs (70 lbs. or more as an adult)." (which is where I got my "70+ pounds as an adult" from).

A search of the AAFCO website tells me this means that the manufacturer not only put a sample of the food through laboratory testing to verify that the food meets AAFCO nutrition standards, but also put the food through AAFCO-standardized feeding trials. AAFCO protocols give a set of parameters for the feeding trials including length of the test and diagnostic tests which determine the success. The FDA website tells me that this specific nutrition adequacy statement essentially guarantees that the food was found to provide proper nutrition. Since AAFCO and the FDA are currently the US's leading organizations on pet food, I'm inclined to trust them when they say a food is OK for large breed puppies.

Since your opinion is clearly different, I'm curious if you can provide any studies/research that indicate an all life stages food is NOT suitable for large breed puppies?
 

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I am familiar with what certain words mean for AAFCO, thank you.

I’m reading an article from Tufts vet nutrition that states, “(The latter means they’ve done feeding trials for both gestation and growth.)” in regards to animal feeding tests using AAFCO procedures for an all life stages food. The feeding trial protocols from AAFCO state in the “proving a growth claim in dog food” section, “a minimum of 8 puppies from 3 different bitches”. So puppies definitely have to be used, unless you have other information that suggests otherwise? I agree that the trials could go on longer for more information, but seeing how the trials are optional to begin with, I’m not complaining too much.

The AAFCO definition of All Life Stages is “gestation/lactation, growth, and adult maintenance life stages” per the 2020 edition of their Model Regulations. Nothing else - link to their 2020 Official Publication.

None of what you said answered my question. Do you have any studies/research that indicates all life stages foods are NOT suitable for large breed puppies?

For example, here’s a study that showed that varying levels of protein in 17 great dane puppies didn’t cause issues: Growth and Skeletal Development in Great Dane Pups Fed Different Levels of Protein Intake - PubMed
Granted the study was only over an 18 week period so I don’t know if they developed any issues later, however, in two other studies in which the calcium and phosphorus (respectively) were varied, there were skeletal issues apparent before the trial was over.
 
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