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Hi all. New member here. Had a look through the raw comments but couldn’t find a specific thread to answer my question!
We have a golden retriever pup on the way to us in around 6 weeks!! Exciting!! We have a 7 year old Leonberger who has been raw fed from post mothers milk, so we never required to “swap over/introduce”. So in this area we are inexperienced. Does anyone have relevant breed specific experience that could pass on some information about the process to me? The breeders will feed the pup a non raw diet once off mothers milk. And we plan to immediately implement raw diet. But... I would have thought going straight into 100% raw wouldn’t be a good idea, but I just don’t know. By same token would going from one kibble diet to another manufacturer for example cause the same tummy upset? Thanks so much for the advice in advanced. Thank you.
Phil
 

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HI and welcome! I've shifted your thread to the appropriate section.

I feed raw, and I would advise to switch slowly, especially for a puppy that is new to your house. It can be a very stressful time for the puppy and a sudden switch coupled with the stress can trigger loose stools. I'd say switch over a period of a 2 weeks to be safe, so do get the kibble that your current breeder is feeding as well.

Give your puppy a boost of probiotics daily as well during the switch and that should help. many people say to avoid mixing raw & kibble, but that is what I have done and had no issues.
 

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Feeding raw is very easy on the puppies system. Most dogs can do close to a cold turkey switch to a raw diet so switching like going from kibble to kibble is more than fine.

You shouldn't need to add probiotics to the food during the transition. The raw meat in the food has it's own natural enzymes (do the same job as probiotics but are better and more effective than probiotics) this is one of the main reasons to feed raw. People who feed raw often don't really understand the reasons and benefits they fed raw or should feed raw.

I've been feeding raw for 17 years. I usually do large breed kibble the first 9 months, then do raw/kibble 75/25 for about 8 months to a year then roll over to all raw at that point.
 

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Hi all. New member here. Had a look through the raw comments but couldn’t find a specific thread to answer my question!
We have a golden retriever pup on the way to us in around 6 weeks!! Exciting!! We have a 7 year old Leonberger who has been raw fed from post mothers milk, so we never required to “swap over/introduce”. So in this area we are inexperienced. Does anyone have relevant breed specific experience that could pass on some information about the process to me? The breeders will feed the pup a non raw diet once off mothers milk. And we plan to immediately implement raw diet. But... I would have thought going straight into 100% raw wouldn’t be a good idea, but I just don’t know. By same token would going from one kibble diet to another manufacturer for example cause the same tummy upset? Thanks so much for the advice in advanced. Thank you.
Phil
I want to add to what both are saying, that however you decide to transition, puppies need to be getting a balanced diet versus a single protein or single organ or such at a time. This is a source of a lot of confusion for new raw feeders as most resources say to start with a simple protein (chicken/turkey) and then add more to the diet per week. However, this is true for adult dogs.

Many raw feeders start with kibble, mix kibble and raw, or do a balanced raw diet from the get go. Just whatever you do, make sure your puppy is getting a balanced diet :)
 

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Feeding raw is very easy on the puppies system. Most dogs can do close to a cold turkey switch to a raw diet so switching like going from kibble to kibble is more than fine.

You shouldn't need to add probiotics to the food during the transition. The raw meat in the food has it's own natural enzymes (do the same job as probiotics but are better and more effective than probiotics) this is one of the main reasons to feed raw. People who feed raw often don't really understand the reasons and benefits they fed raw or should feed raw.

I've been feeding raw for 17 years. I usually do large breed kibble the first 9 months, then do raw/kibble 75/25 for about 8 months to a year then roll over to all raw at that point.
For a new puppy you never know how sensitive their stomachs can be or if they could have food sensitives or allergies. Cold turkey switch overnight works well for some dogs but not all dogs so I like to err on the side of caution and take things slowly. I’ve had too many friends switch cold turkey and have a bout of loose stools and frustrations.

Probiotics are helpful in building up good gut health in general. It can be in the form of kefir, or yogurt, or just probiotic pills etc. It’s not essential, but helpful if you are potentially dealing with a sensitive stomach.
 

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For a new puppy you never know how sensitive their stomachs can be or if they could have food sensitives or allergies. Cold turkey switch overnight works well for some dogs but not all dogs so I like to err on the side of caution and take things slowly. I’ve had too many friends switch cold turkey and have a bout of loose stools and frustrations.

Probiotics are helpful in building up good gut health in general. It can be in the form of kefir, or yogurt, or just probiotic pills etc. It’s not essential, but helpful if you are potentially dealing with a sensitive stomach.
LoL I understand and puppies sensitivity to change. My point is that the majority of puppies can basically change quickly to a raw diet. Raw is that much easier on their system to digest. The reason puppies have such easily update system is until they are about 4 months old, their system have a hard time breaking down carbs and starches. Raw food for dogs rarely have either included. I'm not saying not to mix, I'm just saying it's much easier to convert and you don't need to take 2 weeks for the transition. A weeka time is really all that should be needed, if that much really.

As far as the probiotics, with a raw food, it's not needed as much since the food already has natural enzymes which do the same job but tend to be much more effective than a probiotic additive. So you can add some but isn't likely to add much help, done but not much.

There is one the of probiotic you can add that would help more but you have to get it at a health/vitamin store maybe a drug store like CVS or Walgreens and that is a probiotic called BC30. It's encapsulated so all of it survives the acid in the stomach. It's a 2 stage process before it gets released in the gut and GI tract so all of it is utilized. But generally a regular probiotic or yogurt isn't going to offer much more than what the raw food already contains.
 

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Yupps majority but not all. That’s what I’m saying. We don’t know if the OP’s pup is sensitive. Coming from an almost IBD diagnosis with my girl, I am more cautious.
 

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Yupps majority but not all. That’s what I’m saying. We don’t know if the OP’s pup is sensitive. Coming from an almost IBD diagnosis with my girl, I am more cautious.
I hear ya. Really the big worry is if they are coming home with issues like coccidia or something similar where the system is already compromised. A healthy puppy shouldn't have any issues switching to raw fairly quickly.
 
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