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We got the results from Kona's genetic test, and it looks "good". I was also able to verify that this information was posted to OFA, and then self-posted to K9Data. In addition to feeling like we're "giving back to the golden community", we now have some assurance that there are a category of concerns that we no longer need to wonder about.

As an "oh, by the way", I also was notified by VGL that they achieved International Standard Organization 17025 accreditation. I don't know about the other "big DNA labs", but this made me feel better about our decision to use VGL (aside from their association with UC Davis).

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We got the results from Kona's genetic test, and it looks "good". I was also able to verify that this information was posted to OFA, and then self-posted to K9Data. In addition to feeling like we're "giving back to the golden community", we now have some assurance that there are a category of concerns that we no longer need to wonder about.

As an "oh, by the way", I also was notified by VGL that they achieved International Standard Organization 17025 accreditation. I don't know about the other "big DNA labs", but this made me feel better about our decision to use VGL (aside from their association with UC Davis).

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Yay! Congratulations Kona!
 

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There is something very satisfying about seeing it in black and white. I have confidence in the people at UC Davis.
Congratulations! That’s got to be a great feeling seeing those cleared.
It is quite nice to see these results, especially since this information is not shown (on either K9Data or OFA) for Kona's parents. I never felt it was a huge risk (the breeder seemed fairly conscientious), but...
 

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@SoCalEngr - Congrats! Curious how much did this cost?
There are a coupe of different companies who do this testing and if you keep a close eye out, they will sometimes run specials or discounts. If you do a search on genetic testing for dogs you can compare prices and use the list Socal shared as a template to make sure you're comparing apples to apples.
 

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I’m curious. Kona’s clearances are variously described as “normal”, “normal/clear” and “genotypically normal for...” Is there any difference?
 

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I’m curious. Kona’s clearances are variously described as “normal”, “normal/clear” and “genotypically normal for...” Is there any difference?
I'm not 100% (and, since we don't plan on breeding Kona, I believe any "normal" works for our needs), but...

I believe the differentiation is the finding of "clear".

When breeding, both parents need to contribute for a puppy to develop the condition being tested for. So, a parent who is "clear" does not carry the gene, and it will not matter what the other parent has (although, "clear" would be preferred). But, if a dog is not "clear", it can (is?) be a carrier. If bred to another carrier, there is then a 25% for any given puppy that they will inherit the unwanted gene from both parents and, subsequently, develop the associated condition.

I'm sure the hobby breeders can provide a better explanation, but "normal" (of any flavor) works for us.
 

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Regarding genotypically normal, it's likely that the disease can present due to other processes (one that comes to mind is DM) and the dog doesn't carry the genetics from DM but that does not mean it won't be affected.
 

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I'm not 100% (and, since we don't plan on breeding Kona, I believe any "normal" works for our needs), but...

I believe the differentiation is the finding of "clear".

When breeding, both parents need to contribute for a puppy to develop the condition being tested for. So, a parent who is "clear" does not carry the gene, and it will not matter what the other parent has (although, "clear" would be preferred). But, if a dog is not "clear", it can (is?) be a carrier. If bred to another carrier, there is then a 25% for any given puppy that they will inherit the unwanted gene from both parents and, subsequently, develop the associated condition.

I'm sure the hobby breeders can provide a better explanation, but "normal" (of any flavor) works for us.
Thanks. I’ve just looked at the test report and all the tests are N/N (I.e. no carrier status) so I guess the differences in wording don’t reflect any differences in genotype. 🤷‍♀️ Maybe the tests were reported by different people who use different wording. Anyway, congratulations again.🍾
Regarding genotypically normal, it's likely that the disease can present due to other processes (one that comes to mind is DM) and the dog doesn't carry the genetics from DM but that does not mean it won't be affected.
Ahh, that makes sense.
 
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