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At what age should you start taking your puppy out for walks, I was told not to let him walk outside on streets until he had all his vaccinations or else he could easily catch disease, is this true?

What are other things you do with your puppy so that they get an enough amount of exercise?
 

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I live in Britain, here the final vaccination is about 12 weeks, then you have to wait a week until the vaccination becomes effective. It is quite frustrating having a puppy that you cannot take a walk, but i carried Cooper about getting him used to human attention, although i was very careful that it was only people with vaccinated dogs that petted him. I let him go about his own garden because it is enclosed and no other dog has been there. As for exercise, be careful not to get too carried away and over walk your puppy. A golden retriever needs a lot of exercise but give it a chance to grow and develop before taking it walks for hours! Also when it becomes an adult and needs exercise and you are tired, throwing a ball gives your dog a lot of running around to do without you getting tired :)
 

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Old Guy
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Puppy Socialization vs Health Concerns... This is another one of the great debates concerning dogs (some others are... Raw food verses Processed; 'Reward only'-based Training verses Reward together with Punishment-based Training; to Vaccinate or not; to Neuter or not; adequate exercise verses future bone and joint problems; Electronic Fencing verses a Physical Fence)

On the one hand, you have a puppy's 'window' for socialization which most 'experts' seem to peg at 16 weeks before it starts closing. They say you should introduce your puppy to as many new things as possible... I've seen it suggested that you make sure you introduce your puppy to at least 7 new things every day for 7 weeks (presumably that's beginning at week 8 'til the end of week 15)... for a total of AT LEAST 343 new things before week 16.

But then on the other hand, a puppy's self immunity is not an exact thing. A new born pup gets immunity through mom's milk but that only lasts so long... anytime after weaning (maybe week 4 or 5) the immunity could wear off but exactly when for each of the diseases cannot be known for sure... that's why a series of vaccinations (either 3 or 4) must be given every 3 weeks or so apart. The 'usual' schedule is week 6, week 9, week 12, and week 15. A vaccination is a small amount of the disease (either weaken or killed first) injected directly into the blood stream. This is supposed to stimulate the pup's own immune system to begin manufacturing it's own anti-bodies... the problem is if mom's anti-bodies are still present in the pup's system it will destroy the disease before the pup's own immune system can be stimulated into action. So you see, a gap in your pup's disease protection is very possible. Even if a pup's body does start to develop anti-bodies, it will still take about 3 weeks to get the numbers up high enough to offer the pup adequate immunity to that disease. So even if the last set of shots given (if only a series of 3 are use) are in week 12 you must still add another 3 weeks to that... taking you up to week 16!!!! Wow, what a coincidence??? that's the same time the 'window' for socialization begins closing...

Thus the controversy over Socialization vs Health... what is one to do???

There are no real answers, just people's opinions...

Unless asked to further elaborate, let me just state my own thoughts here briefly... I believe socialization is of the utmost importance between the two. An un-socialized dog will not lead much of a quality life (nor will his family) and so I believe health at that point is secondary. However you can be smart about the way you go about socializing your puppy. Avoid high dog-traffic areas (like highway rest-stops, crowded dog parks, frequented dog-runs and walks, etc) and avoid having puppy come into contact with animals that just don't look very healthy (discharge from the eyes or nose, etc), and do NOT let puppy even get near (let alone eat) any other animal's poop (including birds, rabbits, deer, horse, etc.) Even so, you must realize that your puppy can contract diseases at the vet's office, from an exposed visitor's shoes and clothing, and even infected soil that a carrier dog has visited... keep in mind that even fully vaccinated dogs can be disease carriers. There simply is no way to guarantee your puppy's protection unless he is cloistered away in your house and not allowed to socialize at all... THAT I believe is a mistake. But that is a choice for you to make, and which ever you chose to do... Good Luck...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks monomer!! I really want my puppy to get enough socializing at a very young age, thanks for the tips, i'll keep a watch out for other dogs and people while letting my puppy get to know new things and people.
 

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vacinations

My puppy has had her three sets of shots but the vet said she needs a six month Parvo booster. Has anyone else had that done. Nancy
 

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Old Guy
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Nope... it kinda makes one wonder if your vet is prone toward over-vaccination because of something in his experience or if this is a recommendation from the vaccine makers. Did you ask him? I would ...and I would also contact other vet offices in your area and ask them as well. If you do make the calls, please let us know what you find out...
 

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Thanks, I certainly will cal other vets because I don't want to overvacinate her. Also has anyone ever had their dog eat their azalea bush. We have one and our puppy was chewing on it and then we looked it up and saw that it was poisonous to dogs. We have since removed it, but I was wondering what to look out for. She seems fine.
 

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Took the words right out of my mouth. It's all too often that a vet suggests not bringing pup out till after vaccination s are complete. I actually wrote a page on the importance of early socialization and this critical period. From birth to 12 weeks, whatever encounters the pup has, or doesn't have, will have a defining impact on its social outlook for the rest of its life. So, it is critical to socialize the pup during these very important parts of his life. Every new experience should be neutral or not more than mildly stressful. A normal puppy will be cautious of new sights, but given time, will bounce back. The benefit of socializing far outweigh the possible harm of contracting disease. I woukd list all the pros and cons but the literature is just a google away.I wouldn't bring my pup to a dog park or put him down on a vet office floor, but walks, sounds, smells, and new people and dogs are all part of the socialization period. It's so important.
I also go to a holistic vet with an alternate vaccination schedule, but that's another long story, haha.
And oh my.....just realized this was from 2005!!!!! LMAO
 

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I personally had no choice because I got my pup while travelling in Arizona when she was 10 weeks old. She had one set of shots and the breeder, gave her, her second set right there when we picked her up. A bit early perhaps, but because we were on the road. (and Yes, some may think only a vet should do it, but in the old days, I vaccinated my own dogs and cats too.)
I really tried to keep her away from super high dog traffic areas, but a rest stop is a rest stop for dogs too. I kept her from eating feces the best I could and she was terrified of people and other dogs, so no contact issues there. I really didn't relax until she had gotten her parvo shot, but it all turned out well, and Elsa got to experience so much. For a shy pup it was a lot to take in, but she isn't shy any more!
 
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