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Discussion Starter #1
We had our Sandy put down on Monday due to vestibular syndrome, even though we were told she could recover. I am second guessing our decision..has anyone else had their dog euthanised because of vestibular disease or syndrome???? :(
 

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I'm so sorry to hear about your loss of Sandy. It's so hard to see our beloved furry children get so sick. We had our wonderful Echo put down this Fall. She was a wonderful choc Lab who was 12 1/2. We struggled with vestibular syndrome for 5 weeks and she didn't recover. We thought she might be getting better but one day she lay down and never got up again. We had the vet coming to our house the next day and she was actually passing on her own the hour he arrived. This syndrome is a very hard thing to watch. And from going through it I would say not to be too hard on yourself for the decision you made. Echo lasted 5 weeks but they weren't quality of life weeks in any way. She couldn't walk, she couldn't go up the stairs. She couldn't even go outside to do her business without me holding her up with a sling made from a soft scarf She had always gone to work with me and I couldn't take her anymore. Her tail kept wagging but if she had not had to go through these last weeks that would have been fine. What is Sandy's story? How old was she? Again I'm so sorry for your loss. I miss my Echo every day
 

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My heart goes out to you. Please go easier on yourself. A senior golden down the block from me suffered from this and it was something that improved very briefly for him and then recurred even worse and went on for what seemed like months. It was absolutely heartbreaking to watch and I do not for a moment begin to second guess what you felt was the best decision for your dog and your family. I'm so sorry for your loss.
 

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You have to be comfortable with the decision you made-13 is a very good age for a Golden to live to. I have had 5 Goldens develop vestibular syndrome, a couple of them more than once ;) All recovered and went on to live to a ripe old age, in good health and active. These were all very healthy and active older dogs. I don't know how dogs with other, existing conditions would react. I would think recovery for them would be much more difficult.

Kahli did develop a head tilt after her second episode but lived to be 15. Candy also had two episodes and lived to be 17. It scared me to death the first time, and I was sure Candy was dying. I've gotten pretty used to it now.

I wouldn't hesitate to make the same decision you did, if I didn't feel my dog would recover within a reasonable amount of time, or was too frail.

With all of my dogs, improvement began within a few days and was consistent. I have to wonder if, in the case of Laura's dog, there wasn't something else going on as well.
 

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I don't know if there was anything else going on with Echo Nothing our wonderful vet found. Until she got sick she could jump on her own into the backseat of my truck to go to work and that was pretty good for any old girl to do that so hard to know. Sandy's Mom try not to feel bad. Echo's at the bridge and I'll bet she's playing with Sandy..
 

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Hi Sandy:
Very sorry to hear of your loss. We lost our dear Jacob last Friday evening at the age of 14 (would have been 15 soon) So it's only been a week. If your dog was suffering and not improving than you did the right thing. I will offer my experience. My first experience with a similar problem was 4 years ago when Jacob got Myathinia gravis. It was very severe and he also got pnemonia from it.There was improvement after the diagnosis and medication and he fully recovered. Last spring he got a bad case of vestubular syndrome and he could not even stand. He did show signs of improvement after a couple of days and it took a good month to recover.He still has a slight head tilt and I always thought he felt the world was a little crooked after that. I know we were blessed he recovered and from reading this forum that is not always the case. Again if there is no improvement than you did the right thing to not let Sandy suffer
 

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When one of my Goldens had vestibular syndrome she was only 4 years old so her chances of recovery were good and she recovered about 90%. There are many factors that could make this health issue worse for a Golden. It is never easy to make that final decision no matter what the condition is, and it is easy to second guess ourselves. It will take time but I am sure you will come to know that you did the right thing.
 

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So sorry for your loss. I have never experienced that syndrome, but everything I have heard about it, it sounds very scary.

I want you to know it is very natural to second guess your decision. I have every single time I have had to send a pet to the bridge, but deep down you know that it was the right time. It is the best way you can show your pet your love. Hugs to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thank you everyone. Sandy was 13. She was having a hard time in the past year or so with her back legs, i guess arthritis and the fact that she had ruptured an ACL three years prior. Other than that she was a happy dog, but that is to typical of Goldens. On Sunday she struggled to get up, and when she did, she was shaking like a leaf, her eyes were twitching, head cocked to the side. She laid back down. After that she tried several times to get up and she couldn't. It was so hard to watch. We called the vet and he told us what he thought over the phone, that it was vestibular syndrome. We made the decision that night to have her put down the next morning. Some of the factors we based our decision on were: we both work and could not stay home with her to bring her outside and do her business, plus i just did not want to leave her alone like that period, her age, her bad back legs, and no guarantee that she would recover. I think that we made the right decision, although it was very quick, but i felt some pressure from my husband too.
I guess it's done and now i just have to accept that we did the right thing. The important thing is she is not suffering.
 

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My Toby was diagnosed with probable vestibular syndrome the first weekend of November. We just put him down January 2nd.
The problem with VS is that they really, really don't know if that's what it is and the only way to find out is by either waiting and hoping it gets better, or by doing some very expensive tests that are very, very hard on the dog.
In Toby's case, because we are both at home, we were able to wait and see what happened. He did NOT get better, and eventually they changed the diagnosis to probable brain lesion. Unfortunately, in a lot of older dogs, that is the case. You wait and wait, and it turns out it wasn't vestibular syndrome after all. A friend of mine just went through this with her golden as well and his, too, turned out to be a brain tumor.
You made the right decision, because you made it with love and care for her best interest.
Hugs.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My Toby was diagnosed with probable vestibular syndrome the first weekend of November. We just put him down January 2nd.
The problem with VS is that they really, really don't know if that's what it is and the only way to find out is by either waiting and hoping it gets better, or by doing some very expensive tests that are very, very hard on the dog.
In Toby's case, because we are both at home, we were able to wait and see what happened. He did NOT get better, and eventually they changed the diagnosis to probable brain lesion. Unfortunately, in a lot of older dogs, that is the case. You wait and wait, and it turns out it wasn't vestibular syndrome after all. A friend of mine just went through this with her golden as well and his, too, turned out to be a brain tumor.
You made the right decision, because you made it with love and care for her best interest.
Hugs.
Thank you hotelfordogs, your message was very very helpful. You are right, we would have had to put Sandy through expensive and unpleasant tests, some of which aren't available where we live. She was terrified of the vet so I am glad we spared her of that. So it is very possible that she may have had a brain tumor or something else sinister. I have to tell myself repeatedly that she had a very good, long life. She will always be in our hearts.
 

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My Toby was diagnosed with probable vestibular syndrome the first weekend of November. We just put him down January 2nd.
The problem with VS is that they really, really don't know if that's what it is and the only way to find out is by either waiting and hoping it gets better, or by doing some very expensive tests that are very, very hard on the dog.
In Toby's case, because we are both at home, we were able to wait and see what happened. He did NOT get better, and eventually they changed the diagnosis to probable brain lesion. Unfortunately, in a lot of older dogs, that is the case. You wait and wait, and it turns out it wasn't vestibular syndrome after all. A friend of mine just went through this with her golden as well and his, too, turned out to be a brain tumor.
You made the right decision, because you made it with love and care for her best interest.
Hugs.
Thank you very much for your post. Your experience with Toby was very similar to our experience with Dolly. She was 10 years old when she had her first episode of vestibular syndrome. She recovered about 90% after 3 weeks. She had a second attack on the opposite side 2 months later and she could not stand even with our help. She stopped eating and we asked our vet if there was anything we could do for her. She strongly suspected a brain stem tumor and we decided to put her down rather than go through any more tests. It was the right thing to do, but I still miss her so much.
 

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Ginny recovered twice and we lost her to the bridge through something else, but Holly her sister we did lose - although she was also battling kidney failure, and we and her vet - who I had 100% confidence in knew that it was battle that was not going to be won.

From what you have posted, you did the right thing for your girl, and yes I am sure that we all try and second guess our decisions, but in time you will accept that you did the right thing.
 
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It's easy to second guess yourself, but all you can do is make the best decision you can at the time. You are very fortunate to have her 13 years. BTW, it looks to me you made the right decision.

In time you will be remembering all the good times. Best of luck.
 

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Please don't second guess your decision at all. You did what you thought was the best for your girl. She lived a very good life with you.

I've experienced vestibular syndrome with one of my dogs. It is a very frightening thing to see for the first time. We were fortunate he recovered each time, but it broke my heart to see him like that.
 

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Lost a shepherd/collie mix. Horrible to watch. The dog was just so panicky, because the world wasn't making sense. Left him at the emergency vets under sedation. They called later and said he was bleeding through the ears. Recommended he be put to sleep. We agreed.

It comes on fast. Terror in his eyes. It's the best thing we could have done.
 

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Sandy's Momma

Sandy's Momma

13 is a great age and SANDY was having trouble with her back legs.
Our biggest fear when the dogs were older and ill was going to work and having to leave them for 8-9 hours alone. Sandy lived a good life, was loved and you were with her at the end.
 
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Those are the exact symptoms Rosie had.Plus she had a very rapid heart beat and fluid on the lungs.

The vet didn't mention about Vestibular Syndrome.We have been agonizing ever since that we made the right choice to put her to sleep,especially as we didn't let her be examined further.

It's even more hard to take that if it had been Vestibular Syndrome she could have made a full recovery anyway.

Still heart broken.
 

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I'm so sorry about Rosie. I know your heartache. Toby has been gone 2 weeks yesterday.
To be honest, though, it sounds like there was something more going on with Rosie. The fluid on the lungs is not in keeping with vestibular syndrome at all. My Toby's heart and lungs were strong and clear.
It hurts so much, I do know how you feel.

Those are the exact symptoms Rosie had.Plus she had a very rapid heart beat and fluid on the lungs.

The vet didn't mention about Vestibular Syndrome.We have been agonizing ever since that we made the right choice to put her to sleep,especially as we didn't let her be examined further.

It's even more hard to take that if it had been Vestibular Syndrome she could have made a full recovery anyway.

Still heart broken.
 
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