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I previously posted a question asking about "pet friendly artificial turf". More specifically, concerns about artificial turf and how associated heat issues may affect pets.

We ended up selecting a brand that is manufactured to reflect more heat, and is also very permeable (to allow any urine to quickly pass through, although we also have a designated "potty area" that is not in the main yard). In addition, there are now infills for artificial lawns that will absorb-and-retain water, releasing it when it gets hot (similar to actual grass). Between the turf construction and the infill, the heat concerns are considerably less (more than 70F less in an extreme scenario). The turf will still be hotter than natural grass, but not significantly so. And, a quick hit of water can quickly change this.

To make "the quick hit of water" easier to do, we retained our existing sprinkler system. So, somewhat paradoxically, we have an irrigation system for our artificial lawn. :unsure:馃榿

My "one big change" for the next yard: install a purpose-built drainage system. We have an existing under-grade system that was used to drain the original lawn. It was modified to sit under the sub-base, with the concept being that it will help to remove water as it drains through the sub-base. But, the sub-base is compacted to 90%-to-95%, so the amount of water getting through is not much in a heavy downpour scenario.

For deck-top or roof-top (e.g., high-rise apartments) installations, there are purpose built drainage systems that lie under the turf and channel water to downspouts (or, in our case, the existing underground drain pipes). Trying to grade the base, and then to work to have the water drain through the sub-base is too much effort and prone to error. When I do this again, I will simply have the purpose-built drainage system installed on-top-of the sub-base, and under the turf. This should do a much better, and predictable, job of channeling excess water into the drains.

Here are some pictures of the final installation...
Just a general pic to get an idea of how it looks. The fortress-o'-chairs is isolating an area where we had oleanders, and are still removing the last remnants.
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A picture of Kona in the yard, just for scale. She's about 50lbs in this pic, and does seem to enjoy being able to run around in it.
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Just a bit of a closer look...
875440
 

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It looks great!
It looks amazing!!!
Thank you! I was fairly certain that it would look nice. My big concern was how hot it could/would get, and how that could affect Kona. It seems that there have been quite a few advances in artificial turf, both manufacture and installation, and this is what I really wanted to share. 馃榿
 

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Thank you! I was fairly certain that it would look nice. My big concern was how hot it could/would get, and how that could affect Kona. It seems that there have been quite a few advances in artificial turf, both manufacture and installation, and this is what I really wanted to share. 馃榿
Question: is the water/release system based on evaporation? I understand (I think?) that SoCal is quite dry. Would this sort of system also work in an area with high humidity?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Question: is the water/release system based on evaporation? I understand (I think?) that SoCal is quite dry. Would this sort of system also work in an area with high humidity?
Yes, it is based on evaporation. In SoCal, it is quite rare (unheard of?) to have both high temps and humidity. In an area like the Gulf Coast, the humidity would definitely hinder the cooling effect (although I'd also believe that the humidity would lessen the actual heat build-up in the turf).

Here's a link to some info on the product we used.
 

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Yes, it is based on evaporation. In SoCal, it is quite rare (unheard of?) to have both high temps and humidity. In an area like the Gulf Coast, the humidity would definitely hinder the cooling effect (although I'd also believe that the humidity would lessen the actual heat build-up in the turf).

Here's a link to some info on the product we used.
I feel like I went back to GenChem reading that 馃槀 but it was informative, thank you. I'm very interested because it looks lovely!!
 

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"To make "the quick hit of water" easier to do, we retained our existing sprinkler system. So, somewhat paradoxically, we have an irrigation system for our artificial lawn. :unsure:馃榿 "

I got a good laugh out of that.......

Your artificial lawn looks great!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
"To make "the quick hit of water" easier to do, we retained our existing sprinkler system. So, somewhat paradoxically, we have an irrigation system for our artificial lawn. :unsure:馃榿 "

I got a good laugh out of that.......

Your artificial lawn looks great!
Thanks! Glad I could add some humor into your day.
 

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Looks nice.
That's what we did 5 or so years ago. Still looks good and no muddy paws in the house. Best money we ever spent on our house. :)

ETA:
I guess you probably don't have to worry too much about muddy paws in SoCal ... :D
 

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Looks nice.
That's what we did 5 or so years ago. Still looks good and no muddy paws in the house. Best money we ever spent on our house. :)

ETA:
I guess you probably don't have to worry too much about muddy paws in SoCal ... :D
You'd be surprised. We do a lot of irrigation. 馃榿
 

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Discussion Starter #14
In addition to the "sprinkler system for our artificial turf", here's one more thing that some folks we know don't really understand...

We're doing "all of this" as a dry run for our next house. We've been on a 5-yr plan for quite some time, but it's looking like the time to sell-and-downsize is fast approaching. So, putting in the artificial turf is an experiment to see how we like it, and how we feel about the installation process and decisions we made.

The other "big experiment" we did was adding solar panels and batteries. Not something that makes sense in all areas of our country, but makes huge sense down here in SoCal.
 
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