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Golden ptsd service dog!
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well last nite and this morning i was going over a few obedience commands with Rainey as I have not given them to her inside my house as fear of her wetting my floor . well , last nite i gave her the sit commmand with just my hand, she sat perfect. I then followed with the down command with my gentle voice and hand signal , she went down and rolled her head over and i figured she was piddling on the floor so i got her up and moved her away and YUP a little spot . so i took her to the door . rang the bells and chained her to her potty spot.

this morning we tried again . same thing !!

I have packed up some treats and we are going over to mom and dads to do some confidence training as i use to do with my troops . I dont have much experience with dogs but i do have great experince training soldiers . Not that they are the same but ........ I feel that alittle confidence boost for Miss Rainey will do her some good and may just counter the rolling over and peeing on the floor !!!!!!!! what do yall think will stop the rolling over and peeing on the floor ?
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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If your laying hands on an overly sensitive dog that submissively pees "to get her up and to move her away"....I suspect your asking too much right now.
 

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This is submissive peeing, it is totally involuntary and is caused by fear. Correcting her for the submissive urination will make it worse. You have to just ignore it totally.

At her age it may not ever get better, but confidence building exercises are exactly what she needs. You really have to talk to the training center about these problems.
 

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Kate
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Can you video a training session with her?

It might be easier to tell you what may help or not?

My gut feeling when it comes to soft dogs is to approach them gently and softly, make yourself as soft and "small" as possible so they aren't freaking out. Give and take. You move towards them, invite them to come to you.

What little dog psychology I have when it comes to approaching shy or anxious dogs is they don't like people approaching them straight on or standing very tall or moving assertively.

If you turn your side to them, avoid eye contact, soften your voice, baby talk, and sidle up to them with treats and hands in and give them every chance to come to you, stop halfway and sit on the floor and invite her to come to you... it does help.

The peeing is submissive. From what I read on the previous thread, the poor girl came from a very bad place and you have to gently and slowly teach her to trust you before she can be a normal dog. And it is going to take a lot of time.

One suggestion I have is watch the Horse Whisperer. The idiot human stuff in that movie drives me NUTS, but the way he approached and rehabilitated the horse is exactly how I would approach skittish dogs and horses.


ETA -

I thought a little more about this, but I think the above is IF you are having problems getting your dog to trust you 'period'.

If you have her trusting you to the certain extent that she's mostly fine, except when she thinks you are going to correct her - then there is a way to handle that as well.

My golden idiot is very soft. He's not fearful of me, but I know it would not take a lot for him to switch to submissive escape if I was too strong-handed with him. I'm going back to classes with somebody this winter who is recommends stronger handling than I use. I do like this instructor otherwise and have learned a LOT since taking up her classes. She learned very quickly that she is too much for my dog. He broke a stay in class and just from her going in to show me how to do a correction, it had him popping up from stays and running away when I or she took a step towards him. That corrections was very mild compared to what other dogs would take. It was TOO MUCH for him.

To get him to stop running away when he anticipated a correction when he broke stays after that, I had to be very quiet in walking back towards him. I would avoid eye-contact and keep my body contained and non-threatening as I approached him. This guarantees he stays where he is until I get back to him and gently put him back into position.

This was a difficult thing for me to learn as well, since the goldens I've had before him were a bit harder and required stronger handling. With Jacks, I had to soften up and be aware of my approach towards him.

This is something you probably have to learn when handling your girl.
 

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If your laying hands on an overly sensitive dog that submissively pees "to get her up and to move her away"....I suspect your asking too much right now.
Yes, this is right. If she is doing this, walk away and call her to you, happy voice, everything positive; but keep walking so she is moving forward and not laying down and rolling over again.
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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yep....and is exactly the way every good soldier is trained and conditioned to carry themselves....

 
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well last nite and this morning i was going over a few obedience commands with Rainey as I have not given them to her inside my house as fear of her wetting my floor . well , last nite i gave her the sit commmand with just my hand, she sat perfect. I then followed with the down command with my gentle voice and hand signal , she went down and rolled her head over and i figured she was piddling on the floor so i got her up and moved her away and YUP a little spot . so i took her to the door . rang the bells and chained her to her potty spot.

this morning we tried again . same thing !!

I have packed up some treats and we are going over to mom and dads to do some confidence training as i use to do with my troops . I dont have much experience with dogs but i do have great experince training soldiers . Not that they are the same but ........ I feel that alittle confidence boost for Miss Rainey will do her some good and may just counter the rolling over and peeing on the floor !!!!!!!! what do yall think will stop the rolling over and peeing on the floor ?
for an already scarred dog, punishment is not the answer

as I mention already positive training techniques will help you. it's hard and long, but it will be very rewarding for you.

from ceasar Milan:.... calm and assertive is what you need to be. being angry does more damage

also from him: exercise, discipline, then affection

exercise: go for a nice walk with Rainey first

discipline: positive training (only extreme cases you need to really correct)

affection: really love your dog

Rainey is scarred, just like yourself....remember that. it will take time and patience to rehabilitate her, just like yourself.... almost a perfect match....

you will be rewarded with rainey doing better and yourself as you recover

dogs are wonderful creatures.... they'll always love you no matter how you're feeling
 

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Brent, first off, thank you so much for your service to our country. We are truly humbled by the sacrifices you have made for all of us.

While, I don't have much to add to the excellent advice you have gotten so far, I do want to say Rainey is so fortunate to have someone like yourself as her owner. I truly believe the dogs we need find their way to us. Hang in there with Rainey. She will come around, and the 2 of you will have an amazing bond for having gone thru this together. You are doing a great job with her, and are already starting to notice and read her body language. The more you learn to read her body language, the better you will get, and be able to pick up on the most subtle of her signals. I encourage you to take good notes of what causes her anxiety, and review them with her trainer. They will be able to help you work on training techniques to you build confidence in Rainey in those specific situations. It will take time, but will so be worth it in the end.
 
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