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I wonder if they can do a family tree sort of thing.

Get people who know the lines to report the data and do a big mapping of the trees.

I know you can see genetic issues in families easier this way. Mark the names by color or note numbers for cancers, hip issues, etc. And maybe visually you see a link.

Like are cancers more common in dogs who were breed with young moms and older dads showing issues over slightly older moms and younger dads. etc. (just making up an example) or the more litters a mom has the later litters have more health issues?

interesting read.
 

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Very interesting, would love to hear more (it looked like maybe that was a handout that went with a more involved talk or lecture?).

There were a lot of things that just seemed to make perfect sense right off the bat, while a few were very counter intuitive and therefore more interesting.

Thanks fer posting it! :wavey:

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Thank you both for these. My dear friends who just lost their boy last night I know have tons of questions. I will print and pass both articles along to them. I know it will help them deal with their loss.
 

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I always wondered after reading these articles about how cancer is sometimes inheritable and sometimes not what a breeder does when one of their bitches/dogs dies of cancer and they have younger prospects from that dog/bitch through their current lines. Do they cut the line off completely or do they think it is a fluke?
 

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So much good information--keeping dogs lean and fit, for starters. And how dogs with compromised immune systems, such as those with allergies and skin conditions could possibly be at a somewhat increased risk.
 

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I always wondered after reading these articles about how cancer is sometimes inheritable and sometimes not what a breeder does when one of their bitches/dogs dies of cancer and they have younger prospects from that dog/bitch through their current lines. Do they cut the line off completely or do they think it is a fluke?
The issue is that the genetic factors are so complex that one line of dogs doesn't offer statistically significant information. So one or two incidences of cancer don't necessarily mean that the line is actually more prone than any other. Also, different cancers may have completely different causes, so one dog with osteo, one with hemangio, and one with lympho may have completely unrelated factors.

I think if breeders see one particular kind of cancer cropping up a lot in one line, it makes sense for them to avoid those matches and to treat it like any other problem in a line, but a handful, particularly if it's a mixed bag of cancers, doesn't tell you much about how prone the line really is.
 

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IMO, Rhonda is a phenominal person who has made huge donations to the golden breed, both monetarily and intellectually. I am hoping to show the Tito Monster to her in Louisville in March, not because I think he will win but because I will consider it a huge honor to see and hopefully meet her.
Does anyone know anything about her current research into anti-inflammatories and cancer? A non-reliable source told me she is giving each of her young dogs a baby aspirin daily to prevent inflammation.
 

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IMO, Rhonda is a phenominal person who has made huge donations to the golden breed, both monetarily and intellectually. I am hoping to show the Tito Monster to her in Louisville in March, not because I think he will win but because I will consider it a huge honor to see and hopefully meet her.
Does anyone know anything about her current research into anti-inflammatories and cancer? A non-reliable source told me she is giving each of her young dogs a baby aspirin daily to prevent inflammation.
I've heard that some people are starting to do that, but I don't know about Hovan in particular. There are definitely correlations between long-term inflammatory processes and many types of cancer, which is probably one of the reasons that obesity and chronic infections have strong correlations to increased rates of cancer.

Still, the work is very early in development, but I'm watching with great interest.
 

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I wrote and asked her about the baby asprin last year, and she emailed back right away and said buffered asprin like ascriptin show lots of cancer prevention promise in research, but that there are stomach risks too to consider.
 

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I asked my vet about it and he went into a long unintelligible (to me) explanation that anti-inflammatories over time can cause inflammation, I have NO clue what he was explaining to me, but he also thought the research was of interest.
 

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I asked my vet about it and he went into a long unintelligible (to me) explanation that anti-inflammatories over time can cause inflammation, I have NO clue what he was explaining to me, but he also thought the research was of interest.
I believe there's some evidence that NSAIDs actually modify the body's inflammatory response over time if they're used long term, so even if cancer risk is increased by inflammation, the long-term use of an anti-inflammatory drug may not actually reduce the risk overall, and may have other unintended consequences.

You have to be really careful not to get ahead of the research, or you can end up doing more harm than good.
 

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Thanks for the info. I hadn't thought about kerosene heater fumes...we run one in our garage most weekends in the winter, and Ike does stay out there to be near it's heat. That will stop immediately.

As for anti-inflammatories, I've been giving Ike Kelp and fish oil supplements for this purpose, as I was worried he was too young to be given aspirin regularly and have read that they offer this benefit as well as others.
 

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Where The Bitches Rule
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I wonder if they can do a family tree sort of thing.

Get people who know the lines to report the data and do a big mapping of the trees.

I know you can see genetic issues in families easier this way. Mark the names by color or note numbers for cancers, hip issues, etc. And maybe visually you see a link.

Like are cancers more common in dogs who were breed with young moms and older dads showing issues over slightly older moms and younger dads. etc. (just making up an example) or the more litters a mom has the later litters have more health issues?

interesting read.
There are some long term studies doing basically this as are some breeders I know with their own lones. I know I have shared this before but think again it is appropiate here. When I lost my Kizmet, of my breeding, almost 3 years ago I was very concerned for her littermates and possible future generations. This is the response I got grom Dr. Modiano who was still in Colorado at the time. there just is no simple answers when it comes to cancer.

"As far as the genetics, we don't know the precise answer, but probably
not. Risk is what it is, and whether it manifests young or old is a
matter of how the inherent risk factors that exist interact with each
other and the environment, so there is a bit of randomness to it all.
Some very specific types of cancer in people, and one type of cancer in
dogs are known to be "heritable" in the sense that the risk is
associated with mutation of a single gene (and the gene is different
for each cancer syndrome recognized).
For tumors like leukemia, which also occur very frequently in kids, the
heritable risk is complex and not necessarily such that it will show up
in every individual. So we do not consider that a heritable or
"genetic" disease in the conventional sense.
In other words, the fact that Kizmet got this disease so young is an
unfortunate accident (and please, do not infer that as meaning that we
are any less sorry or upset about the news), but her risk was probably
not significantly different than the risk of any other golden.
Does that make sense? Please do let me know if you find this confusing
and want more clarification."
 

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I found this paragraph particularly interesting:

"In addition, several recent studies have suggested a possibly
improved overall cancer risk profile for dogs of both sexes that have been permitted to mature with their natural
hormones. Some of this data is considered preliminary, and the associations may or may not be supported by future
studies. But there is some data that suggests that the risk of osteosarcoma decreases with every year that the spay
or neuter is delayed. Another study, of over 1200 cardiac hemangiosarcomas, indicated between a 2.4 times and 5
times increased risk of cardiac hemangiosarcoma in neutered dogs as compared to intact dogs (males and females).
Since hemangiosarcoma is the most common cancer in the breed, this data might influence some owners to consider
at least delaying neutering beyond early puppyhood. In addition, the risk of prostate cancer is also higher in
neutered dogs than in intact dogs. However, this is not a common cancer, and it should be noted that the risk of
benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate) is increased in intact males. But while BPH is about four
times more common than prostate cancer in dogs, neutering after diagnosis is usually curative."
 

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Great, great article! I am going out to buy some fresh broc or cabbage today. Do you think it can be frozen stuff? I also found the info about age of death and height very interesting. I wonder if that might have something to do with early spay/neuter, since early spay/neuter is associated with taller dogs too. Maybe if my Dexy was a few inches shorter, he could have lived to be 14.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Great, great article! I am going out to buy some fresh broc or cabbage today. Do you think it can be frozen stuff? I also found the info about age of death and height very interesting. I wonder if that might have something to do with early spay/neuter, since early spay/neuter is associated with taller dogs too. Maybe if my Dexy was a few inches shorter, he could have lived to be 14.
Frozen is good, because it is flash frozen at it's peak and maintains the beneficial nutrients. Even fresh, once picked, is only good for about a week. And there is no telling how long it has been since fresh produce at the market was picked. And for the same reason, frozen is better than canned.
 
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