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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I hope you all are doing great. Recently I heard from a friend that he saw a Black golden retriever. I couldn't believe what he said and searched the internet on the topic of black golden retriever and found a great article with valuable information. I am sharing the link to the article and I hope that this article will provide you insight into Golden retriever with black fur.

Have a great day!

Truth about black golden retriever, do they even exist?
 

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Black Golden Retrievers exist, yes for real, and they are same as intelligent and friendly as The Golden ones but have that glamourous black colour. One of the reasons for the importance of the black Golden Retrievers is that they can surely be purebred. They are just black because of the genetic diversity factor which was added into their bloodline in the breed development processes.
Major people think that a purebred black Golden Retriever is the outcome of a Flat-Coated bred Retriever that was used in the breeding process to make the Golden Retrievers. The black colour they have just becomes of the recessive gene that came up in the next litters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Black Golden Retrievers exist, yes for real, and they are the same as intelligent and friendly as The Golden ones but have that glamourous black color. One of the reasons for the importance of the black Golden Retrievers is that they can surely be purebred. They are just black because of the genetic diversity factor which was added into their bloodline in the breed development processes.
Major people think that a purebred black Golden Retriever is the outcome of a Flat-Coated bred Retriever that was used in the breeding process to make the Golden Retrievers. The black color they have just becomes of the recessive gene that came up in the next litters.

Hey Karthik,

I don't agree with your point if we talk scientifically a black golden retriever cannot exist. If you visit the link I posted earlier you will come to know why a black golden retriever is not possible but let me explain to you here in the discussion.

See we humans have different eye colour some people have brown eyes while some have blue eyes. The different eye color is due to the chromosomes we inherit from our parents. Same is with dogs there are certain genetics that decides the color of the coat which dog will have.

Now dogs with dominant "E" will have a black color coat. While dogs with recessive ''e" gene will have a yellow or red color coat.

If we talk about golden retrievers a pure breed golden retriever will always have a recessive "e" gene. Which further means that two pure breed golden retriever a mother and a father can only pass recessive "e" to its puppies resulting in puppy having gold color and different shades of gold. If a golden retriever puppy is born with different color rather than gold, different shades of gold and cream. It is obvious that the puppy is not purebred. one of its parents is also not purebred.

There are some cases in which goldens can have black spots or white spots in a certain part of their body and this is acceptable as it is because of mutation that happened in the genes.

Further American Kennel Club has set some breed color standards for a golden retriever and they say that accepted shades or color in golden retriever are different shades of gold.

Note: They didn't say anything about the black coat.

I hope now it's clear to you that a black golden retriever is just a myth.

If you still didn't understand you can read the article I will again post the link of the article below.

Truth about black golden retriever, do they even exist?
 

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Black Golden Retrievers exist, yes for real, and they are same as intelligent and friendly as The Golden ones but have that glamourous black colour. One of the reasons for the importance of the black Golden Retrievers is that they can surely be purebred. They are just black because of the genetic diversity factor which was added into their bloodline in the breed development processes.
Major people think that a purebred black Golden Retriever is the outcome of a Flat-Coated bred Retriever that was used in the breeding process to make the Golden Retrievers. The black colour they have just becomes of the recessive gene that came up in the next litters.
It is not possible for the reason the OP stated. Yellow color is recessive and therefore all Goldens are yellow. The spotting is a totally different thing, it is a somatic mutation and all the cells descended from the mutated one during development are also mutated and also black.
 

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Yes, this is the same reason that a pure bred Golden Retriever can't be pure white, genetically it is not possible. So pure white Golden's (white or English cream) have had something mixed in at some point.

Any "Black Golden's" may have a Flat Coated Retriever mixed in somewhere.
 

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One of my friends had a beautiful black lab and Golden Retriever mix. She had the long beautiful coat of a Golden but was solid black. She also had the personality of a Golden. I loved that dog but she was a mutt.
 

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I know of three different people with three different dogs that in general “look” like black golden retrievers. One is my best friends dog. He is a rescue, they have no idea what exactly he is mixed with but they guessed black lab, maybe some Aussie, maybe some golden retriever, maybe flat coat. Another is a family friends dog. He is a mix between a golden retriever and a GSD and is all black with a golden retriever coat and ears but has a very GSD face. Then there is another dog in the neighborhood who also has a golden coat except black, and they guesses she was a golden/black lab/collie mix. I will insert photos of them below. There is no such thing as a black golden retriever, but any number of mixes that could turn out to resemble a black golden as well as a pure bred flat coat.

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I volunteer with a service dog organization that produces Labs, Goldens, and Lab Golden (LGX) crosses. It is possible to produce a black Lab-Golden cross that can be mistaken for a Golden. To get the Golden coat texture/style, you need the dog to be more than 50% Golden. (For example, if the dam is a 50-50 Lab Golden cross and bred to a full Golden, then the puppy is 75% Golden and 25% Lab. With that breeding you could get a puppy with the Golden texture coat but is black.)

Here's an example of a black LGX that's a breeder dog for the organization. She often gets mistaken for a black Golden. But, she is not. She is a black LGX. There are no black Goldens.
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Every time I’ve heard someone say they saw a rare black Golden it’s been a flat coated retriever.
It is not possible for the reason the OP stated. Yellow color is recessive and therefore all Goldens are yellow. The spotting is a totally different thing, it is a somatic mutation and all the cells descended from the mutated one during development are also mutated and also black.
I know of three different people with three different dogs that in general “look” like black golden retrievers. One is my best friends dog. He is a rescue, they have no idea what exactly he is mixed with but they guessed black lab, maybe some Aussie, maybe some golden retriever, maybe flat coat. Another is a family friends dog. He is a mix between a golden retriever and a GSD and is all black with a golden retriever coat and ears but has a very GSD face. Then there is another dog in the neighborhood who also has a golden coat except black, and they guesses she was a golden/black lab/collie mix. I will insert photos of them below. There is no such thing as a black golden retriever, but any number of mixes that could turn out to resemble a black golden as well as a pure bred flat coat.

View attachment 874598 View attachment 874599 View attachment 874600

These dogs are so beautiful. You never know a mixed breed puppy could turn out to be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I volunteer with a service dog organization that produces Labs, Goldens, and Lab Golden (LGX) crosses. It is possible to produce a black Lab-Golden cross that can be mistaken for a Golden. To get the Golden coat texture/style, you need the dog to be more than 50% Golden. (For example, if the dam is a 50-50 Lab Golden cross and bred to a full Golden, then the puppy is 75% Golden and 25% Lab. With that breeding you could get a puppy with the Golden texture coat but is black.)

Here's an example of a black LGX that's a breeder dog for the organization. She often gets mistaken for a black Golden. But, she is not. She is a black LGX. There are no black Goldens. View attachment 874602

She is beautiful.
 

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The dominant E and recessive e are an oversimplification. (My background is in bioinformatics/molecular biology.) Multiple genes contribute to coat color and type in dogs, very likely in a more complicated way than we currently understand. A purebred dog is defined by the breed standard. Meaning, it's defined by how the combination of its genes are expressed in the appearance of the dog. Even temperament you could argue, but it is controversial how temperament is influenced by genetics. Anyways, not sure if that's helpful but just thought I'd chime in!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The dominant E and recessive e are an oversimplification. (My background is in bioinformatics/molecular biology.) Multiple genes contribute to coat color and type in dogs, very likely in a more complicated way than we currently understand. A purebred dog is defined by the breed standard. Meaning, it's defined by how the combination of its genes are expressed in the appearance of the dog. Even temperament you could argue, but it is controversial how temperament is influenced by genetics. Anyways, not sure if that's helpful but just thought I'd chime in!

Sure that is good information.
 

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Coat color genetics is very complicated yes- but for most people the ee argument makes enough sense. There are SOOOO many genes involved in coloration, if you are interested in learning more : Dog Coat Colour Genetics is a good site w most of the genes and the pigments they govern.
 
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