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He wouldn't pass the CGC because of his reaction to other dogs- people ask 'is he friendly?' while he's going insane and the answer is always 'too friendly!'
We're actually going to the park today to practice this. He's improving, but still needs a lot of work.
He'd also probably fail the 'sit politely for petting' part of the test because it says 'sit politely' not 'wiggle around like a happy worm and get everyone tangled in the leash'
We have 10 tricks for our TKN but haven't been able to find an evaluator (which is just as well because I'm waiting for his name change to go through before getting any titles).
I relate to this ha. That was our toughest part of training for CGC with a golden puppy --- sit politely for petting. We enlisted the help of family and friends and had some high value treats on hand. Once he was good with that we went to the park and Lowes to do more of the same. Our instructor also allowed us to give calm verbal praise ("good boy") while he was sitting. No treats are allowed during the test though.

I do think it's worth working on if reaction to dogs and people are his main issue, and going for the CGC. Only reason I mention it is that it really does come in very useful now in everyday life and obedience, and I'm glad we spent so much time working on it :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I relate to this ha. That was our toughest part of training for CGC with a golden puppy --- sit politely for petting. We enlisted the help of family and friends and had some high value treats on hand. Once he was good with that we went to the park and Lowes to do more of the same. Our instructor also allowed us to give calm verbal praise ("good boy") while he was sitting. No treats are allowed during the test though.

I do think it's worth working on if reaction to dogs and people are his main issue, and going for the CGC. Only reason I mention it is that it really does come in very useful now in everyday life and obedience, and I'm glad we spent so much time working on it :)
I'm definitely working on it, just struggling to find people with dogs to help. None of our neighborhood pet dog friends are interested in just having their dogs sit so that we can practice walking past them 😅 I might be able to set something up with a dog person, but she's busy this weekend, so we'll have to wait.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I regret teaching several tricks with luring because now I have to fade it out and am STRUGGLING lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Also, for getting a dog to carry a basket- everything says to give the dog a treat after he puts his mouth on it/picks it up, but if I do that, he'll grab it and immediately spit it out for his treat. Any suggestions?
 

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think you need to work on 'hold' - with a bumper- which'll come in handy later if you decide to do some field work. Take/hold/hold/hold/ give. over and over.
 

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If you want to eventually teach Finn to jump on your back you may want to invest in some fit paws equipment and start training him to be comfortable standing on those. It will build his muscles and body awareness and hopefully make it easier for him to stay on your back when you get to that point. Even if you never pursue that particular "trick," teaching him body awareness, and making sure he's strong physically, will help in any venue you choose.

I don't know if there is anyone near you who is offering anything re canine fitness, but you may want to Google "Karen Kay dog fitness". She's based in Deerfield, NH but I believe she may offer online "courses" through her Facebook page to start you on some basic exercises to build fitness for your dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
think you need to work on 'hold' - with a bumper- which'll come in handy later if you decide to do some field work. Take/hold/hold/hold/ give. over and over.
Thank you! Do you think that I could do it with something else, like a toy? We have bumpers but they are for our boat and are too big to fit in his mouth.
 

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just buy a bumper (dummy) meant for dog training= it'll be something you will use over and over.
 

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I regret teaching several tricks with luring because now I have to fade it out and am STRUGGLING lol
I’ve used luring with Honey and this is how I made it work:
Lure with one hand but reward from the other hand, then start using the lure movement without food in that hand, so that it becomes a extended signal. Gradually abbreviate the signal.
Switch to intermittent rewards as quickly as possible, working quickly to take the dog’s attention off the lack of reward. My sequence might be sit-reward and release-sit-reward and release-sit-yay and release-sit-reward and release-sit-yay and release-sit-yay and release-sit-huge reward and release and hug, all in less than a minute.

Switching from a food lure and reward to a retrievable as lure and reward for part of your training would also be useful.
 

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Also, for getting a dog to carry a basket- everything says to give the dog a treat after he puts his mouth on it/picks it up, but if I do that, he'll grab it and immediately spit it out for his treat. Any suggestions?
Reverse luring methods (given various names depending on who’s “selling” the idea) are useful for teaching duration activities, from a stay to a dummy hold. At their simplest, the lure/reward is temporarily removed as a lost reward signal when the dog breaks duration by moving from the stay or dropping the dumbbell, for example. My lost reward signal with Honey is moving the hand with the reward behind my back, but I have used simply closing my hand to teach other dogs.
When I’m teaching the retrieve or hold, I use something soft (like a roll of fabric) that I won’t want to use later in competition. That way, if there is a problem in early training, the dog won’t associate it with something I need him to retrieve.
 

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I taught “hold” by giving the dog a dumbbell and saying hold as I tapped the underside of the jaw. With lots of work, he’s learned to pick up anything I ask him to. He even wanted to help the judge when she dropped her pen in a trial!
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I taught “hold” by giving the dog a dumbbell and saying hold as I tapped the underside of the jaw. With lots of work, he’s learned to pick up anything I ask him to. He even wanted to help the judge when she dropped her pen in a trial!
Awww, that's so cute!
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
*me continuously being reminded that some tricks are easier with a 40 pound dog than with a 60 pound dog
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Got the bumper- it's a bit too big for him to comfortably put it in his mouth, but we're working on it.
 
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