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I'm thinking about possibly adopting a rescue golden from a foster home. I want to get a really young dog who has good health and is already well socialized with kids, dogs, cats, etc., house and crate trained, and who knows basic manners (no jumping, biting/nipping, excessive barking, begging, etc.) In all honesty, how hard will it be to find a dog as I described above? Are there a lot of rescues out there that would make great family companions without having behavioral problems?
Secondly, how hard would it be to teach an older dog commands and tricks? Is it the same as if I started from the beginning with a puppy?

Thank you!
 

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The Missouri Crew
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There are plenty of rescues out there that would make a great dog, family companion. I have been in rescue for over 5 years and havent found the perfect dog. but there are many who just need basic manners, that are great with kids etc....
 

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Now Caue's Dad Too!
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I think most rescues use foster familys to help with just the items you mentioned. It seems that it really depends on your location as to how often you will find a young golden in a rescue for long.
 

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I can tell you that not all dogs from a rescue will come fully trained. I am with a golden rescue here and the majority of the dogs that come in are because of the economy, not because of behavioral problems. We try to re-train them with crates if they havent used them (if we can) , get them healthy, potty trained (if needed) and work on their manners (if needed). And we do recommend that you take a obedience class to help you bond and to train the dog. Most of mine have been adults and only had to stay here till their adoptive families come along. My new foster coming is heartworm positive and his owners couldnt afford the treatment.
Any dog can learn new tricks no matter what the age. My Daisy is 8 years old and learned how to sit and lay right away.
 

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Although it's nice to be able to engrain behaviors in dogs as young puppies, they can absolutely learn when they're older. My Lhasa Apso was taken into rescue by someone who found him running on the streets. When I saw him, he had been in rescue for about a week, was on his second foster home, and that one was ready to get rid of him too because he was such a brat! I adopted him, trained him, and show him in obedience trials. He's been the top obedience Lhasa in the nation for three years in a row now. (but I will admit that sometimes he is still a brat ;)).
 

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Park, Cam and Ty Rule!
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Although it's nice to be able to engrain behaviors in dogs as young puppies, they can absolutely learn when they're older
I absolutely agree. I adopted Tyson when he was around four years old. He was good in the house, wonderful with kids, house trained and knew a few basic commands such as sit, down and shake. He was a horrible puller though and had actually never been walked on a leash since he was a puppy. I do rally and agility with Park and Cam, so once we adopted Tyson I figured I would just do some basic classes with him. After a few classes he was doing so well, I figured what the heck we would go for our CGC. Well, Tyson passed his CGC and sometimes I swear listens better than Park and Cam combined! I actually decided a few months ago to try an agility class with him. I figured I would end of taking him to the first couple and then would alternate between Park and Cam as it got more difficult, as I was sure Tyson wouldn't get it. Let me just say... Tyson got it, loved it and shocked the heck out of me with how fast he learned. So yes... older dogs can learn!!

I actually do fostering and I think it's possible to come across a dog that meets your description (socialized, crate trained, housebroken and with basic manners), however you simply need to realize that those dogs are not the norm. Good luck in your search.
 

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Missing Naughty Charlie
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Never had a problem the dog i have just taken is 4 years old and a JRT not the easiest dog to train compared to a golden :uhoh: and we are doing just fine with trainning :)
 

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We adopted MacKenzie at about 4-5 months old from Dirk's Fund. She was crate trained, on her way to being housebroken, and well mannered. (Mary was her foster mother). She did have a previous injury to her eye, but that does not seem to be much of a problem.

We also rescued a GSD years ago ourselves, she was about a year old. The first year we had to be patient with her because she was so scared of everything, but once she gained her confidence, she was an awesome family dog.

Every dog is different, but the rescues appreciate that they have a good thing.
 

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We adopted/rescued Bella and she came with all sorts of baggage, it got to the point of us thinking what have we let ourselves in for.

Bella will be 4 in March, understood basic commands, pulled like a trooper, loved chasing rats and digging for moles in the garden.

In fact she almost tried to dig her way to Australia where she was born,

We were so stressed out we did not what to do, we started so many threads on this site i lost count.

Now the good news, after a year maybe more, she has turned into the most doting loveable dog ever.

Yes she still pulls yes she can be stubborn, but thats Bella, it took the best part of a year for her to settle and us to understand her.

I would say to anyone who adopts any dog, you sometimes need the patience of a saint. Believe in your dog and understand that both parties need time to settle.

Some adoption take longer than others, but believe me its worthwhile. :)
 
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