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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, new to this forum!
We have had our little Herbie for almost 2 weeks (he’ll be 10 weeks old on Sunday!) and we are just looking for a bit of advice with toilet training.

We have a fairly large garden with lots of different textures and exciting things which makes Herbie incredibly distracted when we take him out to go to the toilet. We have been stood out there sometimes for 40 minutes waiting for him to go and with no luck. We were recommended to get a pen to place Herbie in when he’s outside so he has no distractions and goes to the toilet in the same place where he recognises his scent. We have done this and it has really helped us spend less time outside.

However, I have a few concerns:
1) We have to physically carry Herbie from the house into the pen - this isn’t going to be realistic as he gets bigger, and more importantly, he won’t be making the association that he physically needs to walk into the pen himself to go to the toilet.
2) He still hasn’t caught on to the fact that OUTSIDE is the place to go to the toilet, and whilst we only have around 2-3 accidents indoors per day, this is because we are watching him like a hawk, and not because he is choosing to go to the door to let us know he needs to go. Sometimes he will bark by the door but oftentimes this is just because he wants to go and play, not because he needs to go

Just for further info; Herbie loves his crate and sleeps through the night with absolutely no accidents, and, when we take him out to go to the toilet he gets lots and lots of praise and treats each time he goes.

Does anyone have any advice/ideas/words of wisdom for us please? It would be great to hear some success stories as well as how long it took to toilet train your puppy.
 

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Generally speaking, regardless of what you do or don't do, most dogs will become reliably house-trained when they are somewhere between five and six months of age. So you have a little way to go yet. At 10 weeks of age, your pup is like a human infant in that he doesn't have any control over the muscles that regulate elimination. In other words, even if he knew what to do, he couldn't stop himself from peeing in the house because he can't yet control the muscles. You should start to see a difference between three and four months of age, as his muscle control develops. In the meantime, keep doing what you're doing. It will get better.

I'm not sure why you have to carry him out of the house, but if I were you I'd start trying to change this before he grows too much.

Otherwise, it's important to reward and show him how pleased you are whenever he toilets in the designated place. Dog training is a long-haul job, not a quick fix. You have to repeat and repeat until it becomes second nature for the dog. Your pup will pick up on what you want, eventually. It,s a question of persevering.

My first Golden fit the standard, in that she became reliably clean in the house when she was just over five months old. My current Golden was a bit quicker; I would say he was pretty reliable at four months of age. We also have a toy poodle who was well over a year old when I considered him to be house-trained, but that was mainly because he dislikes going outside in cold weather and I live in Canada so that is a problem. Even now, at nearly 10 years of age, he will occasionally sneak off to the basement instead of asking to go outside. We have to keep a close eye on him.

Best of luck.
 

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Generally speaking, regardless of what you do or don't do, most dogs will become reliably house-trained when they are somewhere between five and six months of age. So you have a little way to go yet. At 10 weeks of age, your pup is like a human infant in that he doesn't have any control over the muscles that regulate elimination. In other words, even if he knew what to do, he couldn't stop himself from peeing in the house because he can't yet control the muscles. You should start to see a difference between three and four months of age, as his muscle control develops. In the meantime, keep doing what you're doing. It will get better.

I'm not sure why you have to carry him out of the house, but if I were you I'd start trying to change this before he grows too much.

Otherwise, it's important to reward and show him how pleased you are whenever he toilets in the designated place. Dog training is a long-haul job, not a quick fix. You have to repeat and repeat until it becomes second nature for the dog. Your pup will pick up on what you want, eventually. It,s a question of persevering.

My first Golden fit the standard, in that she became reliably clean in the house when she was just over five months old. My current Golden was a bit quicker; I would say he was pretty reliable at four months of age. We also have a toy poodle who was well over a year old when I considered him to be house-trained, but that was mainly because he dislikes going outside in cold weather and I live in Canada so that is a problem. Even now, at nearly 10 years of age, he will occasionally sneak off to the basement instead of asking to go outside. We have to keep a close eye on him.

Best of luck.
Thanks for this Ceegee, and great to hear your pups got on well with toilet training eventually.
The reason we have to carry Herbie out and pop him into the pen, is because: the pen is a little way away from our front door so if he just opened the door and let him walk out, 99% of the time he would not choose to walk into the pen, he’d rather go and play with all the exciting things in the garden! We could move the pen closer to the door, although it wouldn’t be fully up against the door due to the configuration of our steps and flower beds. Additionally, the area in front of our door is mainly a concrete path and I’m not sure their scent stays on that as opposed to grass where it does. Herbie has never done his business on concrete, it’s always been on the grass.
 

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Take him out on leash and walk him directly to his "spot". If you keep him on leash until he toilets, and then give him some freedom afterwards to play with all the things in the garden, he'll soon understand that it's in his best interests to potty quickly.
 

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Take him out on leash and walk him directly to his "spot". If you keep him on leash until he toilets, and then give him some freedom afterwards to play with all the things in the garden, he'll soon understand that it's in his best interests to potty quickly.
Our trainer had us do this, very successfully, with one modification.

We take Kona out on a leash to her "potty place". The first couple of times wasn't always "productive". When that happened, she came back inside...with the leash left on. Wait 10 minutes, repeat. Eventually, the desired behavior happens and praise ensues.

But...

When we walk Kona outside to potty, we always bring her back in when the-deed-is-done. Then, "other things" (e.g., outdoor playtime, walks, etc.) can happen. I believe our trainer wanted to emphasize the behavior as: go to the potty place (on lease), potty, return inside (on leash).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Take him out on leash and walk him directly to his "spot". If you keep him on leash until he toilets, and then give him some freedom afterwards to play with all the things in the garden, he'll soon understand that it's in his best interests to potty quickly.
Great idea, we’ve started the lead training and so far he thinks it’s a toy to chew so they may distract him, but we’ll definitely give it a go! Thanks 😄
 

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Our trainer had us do this, very successfully, with one modification.

We take Kona out on a leash to her "potty place". The first couple of times wasn't always "productive". When that happened, she came back inside...with the leash left on. Wait 10 minutes, repeat. Eventually, the desired behavior happens and praise ensues.

But...

When we walk Kona outside to potty, we always bring her back in when the-deed-is-done. Then, "other things" (e.g., outdoor playtime, walks, etc.) can happen. I believe our trainer wanted to emphasize the behavior as: go to the potty place (on lease), potty, return inside (on leash).
That sounds like it could work for Herbie! We will give that a go 😊 Thank you!
 

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We used a leash.. it is on at all times outside the crate. Still. I can grab her as needed and can steer her outside to where she needs to potty .
She had her Aha moment around 13-14 weeks.
She is bell trained and 99.9% reliable at 5 months 1 week
 

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Keep repeating a command to go while walking him in his spot and a treat reward when he starts to go. He'll soon get the idea to go on command. My Bubba learned in about a week to go on command. House training took a about 2 months until I think he got it. Are you using a crate? Read the forum posts about crate training. When he starts to cry and bark leash him up and quickly walk him outside. No stops on the way unless you're carrying him.
Remember, accidents happen and it does get better.
 

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You are doing a lot of good training! It just takes time and repetition! One thing that is going on here, is as the dog goes in his place, the scent he leaves in that area, will help stimulate him to go, both 1 and 2! And this is still true even when you clean up the area...he still can smell the scent!

We keep our six foot lead on our pup all day or night whenever he is out of the crate. Usually, one of us holds the lead and drag him around to be with us while we do our daily ratinés. By doing this we can tell when he has to go, he gets restless and starts smelling for a place to go. Keeping him on lead will also protect him from chewing or eating something that may hurt him.

After his obedience training is good, especially coming when called (recall) we will stop using the lead, except for outdoors...

Good Luck
 

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Scent is powerful stimulant for dogs. My Bubba can't walk past a certain spot on our walks without leaving a "deposit" for me to pick up. If I walk him far away from that area all is well.
 
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