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Social Therapy Dog
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is anyone else having problems with ticks right now being its the middle of winter? Amber and I go out and hike 4-5 miles a day and4-5 times per week we go out hiking in heavily deer populated areas with Ambers friends. For the last month or so ever single time we go out I'll find deer ticks all over her! I mean up until this week it's been like 10 degrees out at night! Most days I'll find5-8 deer ticks crawling around her face. Yesterday I found 10 of them on her. I did not apply frontline this or last month simply due to trying to use as little of that stuff as possible(it scares me a bit for sure). I just got a years supply this morning now. Later this afternoon I found two of the little buggers all swollen up and attached, one under her chin and the other on the inside of her ear flap. I've come to expect this in the summer where at times this summer I was finding 15-20 in a days time. I just don't know what e lse to do. I started using a spray to put a light coat on her belly and chest peice before going in the woods during the summer as well as using frontline once a month. Anyone have any problems like this? How about any suggestions? I would love to find a better way to reduce the number of ticks she's getting(other then just staying inside) other then having to apply so many chemicals to the poor girl. All these chemicals just can't be good for dogs when you consider they are all a type of pesticide. So I try hard to use as little as possible.
 

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I'm so with you on this perplexing issue. The frontline and preventic collars make me nervous bc of cancer; the ticks are just loaded with 7 or 8 really scary diseases. I HATE them.




Is anyone else having problems with ticks right now being its the middle of winter? Amber and I go out and hike 4-5 miles a day and4-5 times per week we go out hiking in heavily deer populated areas with Ambers friends. For the last month or so ever single time we go out I'll find deer ticks all over her! I mean up until this week it's been like 10 degrees out at night! Most days I'll find5-8 deer ticks crawling around her face. Yesterday I found 10 of them on her. I did not apply frontline this or last month simply due to trying to use as little of that stuff as possible(it scares me a bit for sure). I just got a years supply this morning now. Later this afternoon I found two of the little buggers all swollen up and attached, one under her chin and the other on the inside of her ear flap. I've come to expect this in the summer where at times this summer I was finding 15-20 in a days time. I just don't know what e lse to do. I started using a spray to put a light coat on her belly and chest peice before going in the woods during the summer as well as using frontline once a month. Anyone have any problems like this? How about any suggestions? I would love to find a better way to reduce the number of ticks she's getting(other then just staying inside) other then having to apply so many chemicals to the poor girl. All these chemicals just can't be good for dogs when you consider they are all a type of pesticide. So I try hard to use as little as possible.
 

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Yikes! I have been lax about putting Frontline on Tucker in the winter thinking ticks were really not an issue. We live in the woods, and have had neighbors who have gotten lyme disease. Luckily we haven't. We don't do long walks in the woods with Tucker too often, so we have not had the issue with finding Ticks on Tucker. Looks like we will be applying Frontline more often now! Wish I had some ideas for you to reduce Amber's tick issue, but I don't. Have you found them on yourself as well? I hate using bug spray- thankfully I find that I for some reason do not seem to pick them up even though I spent a lot of time fishing in the woods. My wife, however, picks them up rather easily. I think it has to do with the perfume she uses. Hope you can find a safe solution for your tick issue. Perhaps try switching the shampoo that Amber uses?
 

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In the Moment
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I've had good luck with the Springtime Bug Off garlic added to their food. You might want to read about it at their site: www.springtimeinc.com It does take some time to build up in their system. I, too, try to use the Advantix only sparingly.
 

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Jester & Piper's Mom
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I know what you are saying. I hate using the chemicals so I was lax about it last winter and Jester picked up a tick in Feb. He tested Lyme positive in March so we went through the whole antibiotic treatment. The vet convinced me that using Frontline was "the lesser of two evils" between the chemicals and tick borne diseases. I resigned to using it every 6 weeks but again was a little late this past December. We had one Sunday that was 65 degrees and lo and behold Jester had an engorged deer tick attached to his head! I've tried all kinds of alternatives for tick prevention but the deer ticks around here are relentless. Frontline Plus seems to be the only thing that will work but it must be applied at least every six weeks (I try to stretch it out) and the days of thinking that the ticks will not survive the winters here are over. :(
 

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We also discontinue use of flea & tick protection in the winter. Perhaps it's time to rethink that idea.

Unfortunately, in our experience, neither Frontline nor Advantage seems to offer real good protection against ticks. We have experienced attached and gorged ticks with both products. They are great products for flea control, so we just try to stay out of the brush, and that seems to be the best solution for us.
 

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I also was very concerned about using pesticide monthly on Ruby. I found a product recommended by a friend called Flea Treats. It is a natural supplement that repels fleas and ticks. I started using it almost a year ago and have had great results. When Ruby was on Revolution, she would still get numerous ticks. We live in So. Cal and we really don't have the threat of Lyme Disease, every other tick is waiting in our bushes. She would pick up 2 or 3 a day. We have not had any problems. You can go on www.fleatreats.com and check out their product.

Vicky, mom to Ruby-17 months
 

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I also was very concerned about using pesticide monthly on Ruby. I found a product recommended by a friend called Flea Treats. It is a natural supplement that repels fleas and ticks. I started using it almost a year ago and have had great results. When Ruby was on Revolution, she would still get numerous ticks. We live in So. Cal and we really don't have the threat of Lyme Disease, every other tick is waiting in our bushes. She would pick up 2 or 3 a day. We have not had any problems. You can go on www.fleatreats.com and check out their product.
Thank you for this tip. This product contains brewers yeast and Vitamin B Complex. I know someone who has a lab. He's a hunter and they spend a lot of time in the woods. He a very holistic type and swears by brewers yeast as the best remedy for fleas and ticks.
 

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Social Therapy Dog
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Interesting holistic approach. Thanks! I purchased a tick/flea collar today and while it seemed to work(I figured I would use it only on days when we go out into the areas that are over infested with deer and save it in a vaccum bag inbetween). The only problem today was that Amber and her play friend(Black lab her age named Lola) both were running down the trail at the park on our way back to the house after a 5 mile walk and as Amber was chasing Lola, lola jumped into the water. Previously up until a week ago this whole lake was covered in thick ice(15 inches thick) and were had been walking across it..etc. Now the first foot from shore is all water and the rest is thin ice. So both dogs go crashing through the ice. Lola turns aorund and swims to shore and gets out. Amber instead tries to go towards the ice since it seemed like a stable thing to grab to. At this point I can see shes panicky. By this time I have my jacket off and am at the shoreline getting ready to go for a very very cold swim. She finally hoisted herself up on the ice shelf and laid flat on her belly scared to death. I coaxed her to swim back to me where I could grab her collar and pull her out. I'll tell you I have never been so scared for her. I know they wer bred for cold water retrieveral and she was completely fine from being in the water but I kept htinking she may walk further out on the ice, being scared and fall through there and I would have to try to break the ice swimming out to get her. I know she did not mean to go in the water as she is not a swimmer. Up until this point she never goes in water where she cannot stand. So yea, the trial run with the tick/flea collar kinda took a large backseat to this episode. Will try again wed.
 

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You all have my sympathies - we don't have them at all in northern Alaska.

Though a few years ago I did field work in Africa, and after every day out in the savannas there'd be scores of the little ass-holes climbing up my pant legs. I found one in a semi-private body location that was fat and happy there, and it made me shudder to think it had been there for days. I lived in fear for some time thinkin' it had given me a disease.

Being a field biologist, there are very few critters that give me the creeps, but ticks are at the top of the list :vomit:
 

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Social Therapy Dog
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Pudden, I agree with you! I backpacked through central america in 94,starting in Belize,through Guatemala,ending up in El Salvador. I had gotten intothe habit of wearing tight fitting "brief" style underwear made of Nylon for support and wicking moisture away. TWICE,Ifound ticks embedded and swollen at the line where the briefs ended. Needless to say those were ALL I wore the entire trip after that.
 

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I have discovered on my tick list that amber (the gem) is suppose to help repel ticks on dogs and cats. So I have been investigating it further and started making dog necklaces out of amber. Several people on the list swear by it, and I have sold several to people on my tick list. The amber must be raw and unpolished, I order the raw upolished amber from from Lithuania...(beware of fake amber or altered amber) the amber is fossilized conifer tree resin, millions of years old. The terpenes it gives off in the pets fur helps repel, plus it has electro static properties, when rubbed with a cloth, or in this case worn on the fur, causes a static charge which makes the ticks/fleas uncomfortable and leaves its host...
If you are interested in trying out this discovery, go to my blog or e-mail me, I have ordered a quantity of amber and am making dog necklaces...
http://amberstonepets.wordpress.com/

It is worth a try, as 2 of my dogs came down with ehrilichiosis, and I am doing everything humanly possible to keep those buggers off my fur kids!
I am working on a website you can order off from eventually...not done yet tho :(
 

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Cedar's Mom
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I've had good luck with the Springtime Bug Off garlic added to their food. You might want to read about it at their site: www.springtimeinc.com It does take some time to build up in their system. I, too, try to use the Advantix only sparingly.
Thanks for the info on Bug Off! The 2 acre lot next to us is undeveloped with pine trees & brush with a stream running through it. Cedar doesn't even have to really leave home & he's in tick heaven. We fight them constantly! FWIW - Springtimeinc.com is having a buy 2, get 2 free sale - so of course I bought 2. (so I'll have 4 - sure hope it works!!)
 

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I hate ticks!!!! Luckily they aren't much of a problem until the Middle of April and then the vast majority of them die down around mid July....
My wife's terrible about ticks, she's a massage therapist and is always worried someone will have one embedded in their back when they come in during the summer.
 

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I don't do frontline in the winter but I'm not shocked about the ticks. It's gotten into the 40s here and I know if I took him out in the woods I'd find ticks on him no problem. We just stay out of the tick areas.
 

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Social Therapy Dog
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, just an update since the original post I began using a simple flea/tick collar ONLY when going out in areas with high tick concentrations. One reason is that I do not want to have a collar on Amber when she plays her friends I did not want to worry about them getting caught in it during playtime roughhousing. Second reason is that I try to use chemicals as sparingly as possible on Amber. So it seems this approach, for at least the winter time, has worked. We've continued to go out into "high tick areas", the same areas that up until not I was finding upwards of 10-15 ticks at a time after two hours of hiking. Now Its difficult to find more then one or two ticks on her. It's been in the mid forties here as well so I figured ticks would be out alot more then when it was 20 degrees out as previous trips. Now I put the collar on her when we get to the area and then remove it and place it in one of those ziplock bags that has a hand vac pump to seal it. Seems to be working pretty well at this point.
 

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Keep an eye on her for the next six months. Yep...SIX months. It can take that long for some of the tick borne diseases to cause any type of noticeable illness.

With so many on her so frequently, you want to make sure to check her for Lyme (and the other diseases) with a SNAP 4Dx (at the Vet) in about 2 mos (if no illness occurs prior to that). Then if it's clear, don't relax yet. Just keep an eye on her for any limping, lack of appetite, vomiting, etc. over the rest of the 6 month spread.

IF she shows any of those symptoms, have her tested again, ASAP.
 

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Social Therapy Dog
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Keep an eye on her for the next six months. Yep...SIX months. It can take that long for some of the tick borne diseases to cause any type of noticeable illness.

With so many on her so frequently, you want to make sure to check her for Lyme (and the other diseases) with a SNAP 4Dx (at the Vet) in about 2 mos (if no illness occurs prior to that). Then if it's clear, don't relax yet. Just keep an eye on her for any limping, lack of appetite, vomiting, etc. over the rest of the 6 month spread.

IF she shows any of those symptoms, have her tested again, ASAP.

Thank you very much for the info! It's scary when you consider just how many ticks are on dogs who go in the woods in this area! I'm just praying that the three I found that were attached over the winter(found within 24 hours of being attached or less) did not have anything that could be passed along. I hope these lyme disease vaccinations she gets actually work as I've heard some bad press about them lately.
It's tough to have a dog that lives to go hiking in the woods and have to worry about these illnesses constantly even with precautions. Thanks again for the information, I appreciate it.
 

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Hey all. I made the decision a while ago that Frontline was absolutely the lesser of two evils, since its side effects are so statistically small that it's hard to prove they even exist, while TBDs are unquestionably debilitating, insidious, and sometimes fatal.

So Comet gets a full dose of Frontline on the 15th of the month, without fail, even in the deep winter. Even with that dose, the 50 degree weather in CT today meant 8 ticks gathered on today's woods walk, with three getting a chance to embed briefly before we found and yanked 'em. Frontline, unfortunately, takes several hours to kill a tick, which is enough time for them to bite and potentially pass on anaplasmosis, but most likely not Lyme (Lyme apparently takes longer to transmit).

We do what we can, which means Frontline, a SNAP 4Dx test every six months, and a refusal to live in fear of the little arachnid buggers.

After some serious soul searching, I decided I absolutely can't trust my beloved dog's health to any solution that isn't backed by solid, researched, peer-reviewed evidence, which means I can't throw out the Frontline in favor of a holistic remedy or an amber necklace. I don't think those things hurt, necessarily, but I also can't trust them with my dog's life.

However, it's important to note that garlic does have the potential to hurt a dog, since it contains thiosulphate (the same chemical that makes onions dangerous). While a little garlic doesn't have enough thiosulphate in it to cause a serious reaction, a dog's system can't break it down, so regular doses can cause a dangerous buildup, leading to anemia or kidney problems.
 
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