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So I kinda sorta stole this idea form Poodle forums LOL, but I thought it would be fun to hear what you all have to say about it!
things I’ve learned include:
  • That skin allergies/itchiness is pretty common in Goldens
  • Goldens are one of the most overbred breeds
  • My Golden isn’t the only absolute weirdo of a dog 😂😂
 

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I'm in the same boat as SteveRuffin...my first golden pup comes home in a few weeks and I wanted to prepare myself. This truly is one of the best resources for information about goldens. I've been using this page to search for information for the past 14 months even though I officially joined as a member in December. If I had to put my key takeaways into sentences, I have learned about:

  • How to read clearances and assess the quality of a litter based on info on parents and breeder
  • What products to buy for my puppy
  • How to groom a golden
  • Training tips
  • Food
  • How to treat and prevent common health problems
  • Possible activities to get involved in with my golden
  • Travel tips
  • Other resources: books, golden retriever clubs, videos, groups, shows, etc...

And much more. The great thing about it is that as the years go on with my pup I'll be using different sections of the forum. There is so much relevant information on here for anyone at any point in their journey with goldens.
 

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Kate
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Going back to when I first joined this forum....

It's normal for dogs to have all black boy parts. They do not have a terrible disease just because of that. :D

Snow nose is not caused by snow or metal bowls or a virus. It's hereditary.

Bathing dogs frequently, even weekly - will help their coats grow + keep their skin healthy.

How to remove a tick correctly.

How to teach articles and go-outs to dogs.

How to correctly groom (talking basic brushing your dog while spritzing with a brushing spray or detangler) a golden retriever.

What a correct bite (teeth number and position) looks like.

That the northeast region of the US and some parts of the southeast region of the US is Tick Hell.

The importance of getting your pet golden's eyes OFA'd every year - see threads on pigmentary uveitis.

First rule of field training and competition is.... if you do not do it yourself, you do not talk about it. Oddly, it is not the same for other sports. :ROFLMAO: Conformation, everyone discusses the inner workings of the sport of running your perfumed and excessively coifed (LOL) pampered beast around the ring.

According to some.... a conformation dog is a blond dog. And a red dog is a field bred golden. :D

DCM. Oh the DCM.

just how small the golden retriever world is... at least the people who "do stuff with their dogs".

^^^ I have to prep for a work meeting, otherwise, I'd have a lot of fun reciting the good, bad, ugly... and lovely, of course. :D
 

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I Love Therapy Dogs
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The importance of getting your pet golden's eyes OFA'd every year - see threads on pigmentary uveitis.
I learn something new just about every time I get on here...As an example, I just learned something new while reading Kate's answer LOL. Somehow I missed pigmentary uveitis but I'm off read all about it.
 

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How to teach articles and go-outs to dogs.
I may have first heard about NCL here.
If someone teaches me what "articles" and "go-outs" are that will be two more things.

I've also learned about the value of Ukrainian dogs in a pedigree.:cool:
 
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I've learned to keep my mouth shut on public forums by not starting threads and making breeder recommendations primarily by PM because people can be so rude.
 

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I came across this forum early in my search for a puppy.
I learned about OFA and health testing here.
Having never raised a puppy before, I learned a lot about puppies by reading posts here.
I also had no idea there where so many different dog sports before reading about them here.
 

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Kate
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I don't have the time or desire for obedience so could you enlighten me on articles and go-outs?
Actually I had a second think and considered that both articles and go-outs have some basis in field training with the mark/send for go outs and sending to piles for articles. Just quite different and articles is something I've heard people have problems with after training force retrieves for field.
 

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I've learned that most of the people that buy golden pups would have been happier with a stuffed toy. (Actually, I guess I already knew that.)

Articles: The "official" name of the exercise is Scent Discrimination. It is a Utility level exercise in OB. (Utility is the highest level.) Basically, the dog looks through a pile of objects for the object his handler has scented. In AKC (slightly different in Canada, but same idea), the handler brings a bag of 10 articles, comprised of 2 sets of 5 identical articles. The handler gets to chose among leather, wood, or metal (2 of the 3) sets. The judge chooses one each from the 2 sets. A steward sets out the 8 other articles. The handler scents one of the 2 selected by the judge. The judge carries the scented article to the pile with a pair of tongs and sets the article among the others scented by the ring steward. The judge steps back and directs the handler to "Send your dog." (The dog and handler are facing away.) The dog goes out to the pile and sniffs around and, hopefully, picks the correct article to bring back. The exercise is repeated for the second article. Photo is my dog, Pinyon, returning from the pile with a metal article. The person with the clipboard is the judge.
Dog Carnivore Mammal Fawn Felidae


A "Go-out" (official name: Directed Jumping) is also a Utility-level exercise. The dog is sent by the handler to the other side of a ring, about 50 ft across and told to sit about 5 feet from the ring end. There is a jump to the left and a jump to the right. The judge tells the handler which jump to send the dog over. The handler indicates the correct jump, the dog (you hope) takes the correct jump and comes to sit in front of the handler. To someone that does field work, this sounds like it would be a very simple exercise. The dog is only being sent a few feet away, a miniscule distance compared to the distance of a field trial blind. The problem? In a hunt/field trial blind, the dog KNOWS there is something out there. In a go-out, the dog is going to a wall or the end of a ring, being told to sit, and then being called back. It makes no sense to the dog.
 

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I've learned that most of the people that buy golden pups would have been happier with a stuffed toy. (Actually, I guess I already knew that.)
(y):ROFLMAO::LOL::cry:

"Scent Discrimination" would conflict with, be contrary to, some field training basics. Retrievers usually have good situational awareness though.

Go-outs sound like a handling drill for field retrievers.
In a hunt/field trial blind, the dog KNOWS there is something out there.
Actually, by definition, a blind retrieve means the dog doesn't "know" there is anything out there. The handler tells the dog there is something and the dog has faith that the handlers instruction will guide him there.
To further complicate things, a "diversion bird" is often thrown near, over and/or up wind of the route to the blind. The handler has to tell the dog not to get that bird and instead go as directed to an unseen bird.
 

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Kate
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The person I train obedience with used to do drills with her FCR at open floor thingies prior to getting that dog's MH. A bit more complicated than just sending a dog in a straight line until he can't go any further (go out training), but similar handling in some ways. No whistles in obedience! :D

Articles - main issue is field dogs are trained to go and GRAB. It breaks their brain getting them to not blow through the pile and grab the first article they reach.
 

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Articles - main issue is field dogs are trained to go and GRAB. It breaks their brain getting them to not blow through the pile and grab the first article they reach.
In basic field training we do "pile work". The dog is sent to piles of bumpers as part of teaching things like casting. Sorting through the pile is called "shopping" and is discouraged.
It is actually a natural thing for a dog to grab an object he is familiar with. If I were to put out a pile of new bumpers and just one or two of my old, well used, bumpers, my dogs would most likely grab the old bumpers first.


I learned a hard lesson at an amateur field trial stake last year. Blinds at field trials must have a "conspicuous" marker on them. It is common practice to use natural objects that will be obvious to the handler but not to the dog. It is also common, and wise, to put several false markers out as the dogs quickly figure out to look for them. I was working at the trial and helped set up the land blind and the markers, real and false, all leafy branches from nearby trees that we stuck in the ground.
When Jake ran he did a beautiful job on the first 90% of the blind (about 350-400 yards). Then he smelled the false markers several yards short of the blind that I stuck in the ground:(. He thought he must at the blind, he would have been in training.
Don't help with setup of blinds at trials you are running.
 
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