Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 221 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There was a discussion in another thread where someone asked as a prospective dog owner which was better raising from a puppy or adopting an older dog.

This is my experience only not the be all end all.

Both of my big breed dogs (our doberman that lived to 14) and our current golden are/were extremely well disciplined. Both leave the room upon command. Both go inside and outside on command (when I am outside and tell the dog "get inside" it does so promptly. Neither dog ever would bolt from us when free the yard and would always come to us immediately upon calling.

Both dogs never had even the slightest biting tendency even when feeding. The doberman which was naturally aggressive when people came to the door (but all bark no bite) actually preferred to eat with company around. In both dogs cases, you could stick your hand in the food bowl and then hand feed them and their tales actually wag in happiness at the company. Both dogs would drop a meat bone on command (not too happy about it but would).

We have kids at home. Aggression in a dog with kids is unacceptable. Sadly if your dog shows it towards your kids, the dog is usually abandoned. So its not only a family consideration its also a dog future consideration to make sure your dog has no aggression.

Neither of my big breed dogs ever received any professional training. All came from me. I am not a breeder nor a dog expert. So its not b.c of me that both dogs turned out disciplined w/ no aggression, (key in adobie a breed known for aggression). I think our dogs were/are obedient and show no aggression b/c they were raised from puppyhood. I know little about and didn't spend that much time training the goldie so he is self taught. Maybe its the breed. I think its the experience of growing from a li puppy with a faamily. (funny thing is I spent the most time trying to teach the golden shake and he just can't learn it)

But somehow the golden has instinctively learned the important commands of going inside on command (it just happened) and never bolting from us, and leaving the room on command etc).

But that is just my experience. Others who have adopted older dogs may have their own. I believe my big breeed dogs obey me so well and show no aggression and will drop food on command etc because they have learned to trust me/our family. They know (knew) that we were there for them and would never harm them.

A dog that you have not raised just does not have that personal bond imo. And you do not know their past.

We adopted from a shelter a one year labrador about 20 years ago, The dog was aggressive and a biter. Knowing we were going to have children we returned the animal within one week. My sense was that an adult dog with aggressive tendencies could not be turned.

The aggression issue is why I beleive so strongly in raising dogs from puppies.

Switching subjects there is a sad threa below where someone is very angry that so many dogs abandoned at their local shelter were older. I went to site and saw that many of the old dogs being abandoned could no longer control their waste functions indoors. That is a very difficult situation for a pet owner and I understand why the owners made decisions in those cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,107 Posts
That's why I beleive so strongly in raising dogs from puppies. On old dogs being abandoned, I posted below that some of those dogs were let go because they could no longer control their waste functions indoors. That is a very difficult situation for a pet owner and I understand why the owners made decisions in those cases.
Huh. :scratchch
 

·
...
Joined
·
16,000 Posts
This is my experience on why I feel very strongly that raising your animal from a small puppy leads to a much better discplined and happy pet and family experience.

Both of my big breed dogs (our doberman that lived to 14) and our current golden are/were extremely well disciplined. Both leave the room upon command. Both go inside and outside on command (when I am outside and tell the dog "get inside" it does so promptly. Neither dog ever would bolt from us when free the yard and would always come to us immediately upon calling.

Both dogs never had even the slightest biting tendency even when feeding. The doberman which was naturally aggressive when people came to the door (but all bark no bite) actually preferred to eat with company around. In both dogs cases, you could stick your hand in the food bowl and then hand feed them and their tales actually wag in happiness at the company. Both dogs would drop a meat bone on command (not too happy about it but would).

Neither of my big breed dogs ever received any professional training. All came from me and I am not a breeder nor a dog expert or even a dog nut. In the doberman's case, I did read a book on training and spent a bunch of time training her as a puppy. But in our golden's case, I was older and busier and really spent probably less than 3 total hours in formal lessons/sessions training him. He doesn't know all the cute tricks our dobie did (like hold the baby where the dobie would literally lie on her side and we would put our less than one year old baby on our abdomen and she would like still until we lifted her, or the absolute refusal to cross a street (at least when we were present) until released, or the kiss the baby where she run to nearest child and likc them. Heck I cannot get our goldie despite trying multiple times to figure out "shake" (the dobie knew how to switch paws in shake).

But somehow the golden has instinctively learned the important commands of going inside on command (it just happened) and never bolting from us, and leaving the room on command etc).

That discipline comes from one on one training and time with the owner and being raised from a puppy. And trust. And being raised from a small puppy. I believe my big breeed dogs obey me so well and show no aggression and will drop food on command etc because they have learned to trust me/our family. They know (knew) that we were there for them and would never harm them. I think it also comes from never striking an animal. Discipline in both our dogs cases is time out in the shower in a batthroom off our kitchen (the shower replaced the "cage" that they would live in as young pups). In both dogs cases, a simple get to the cage and they scamper tails tucked into the shower and wait to be released. Fortunately for our Golden I cannot remember having to send Kyle to the cage in the last year.

A dog that you have not raised just does not have that personal bond imo. And you do not know their past.

Raising a dog from puppyhood creates a unique bond. You are their world.


I have raised 3 dogs from 6-8 weeks puppyhood through natural death in the first two cases and our current dog, a healthy golden of 5.

We adopted from a shelter a one year labrador about 20 years ago, The dog was aggressive and a biter. Knowing we were going to have children we returned the animal within one week. My sense was that an adult dog with aggressive tendencies could not be turned.

That's why I beleive so strongly in raising dogs from puppies. On old dogs being abandoned, I posted below that some of those dogs were let go because they could no longer control their waste functions indoors. That is a very difficult situation for a pet owner and I understand why the owners made decisions in those cases.

THis is one of the more interesting posts I've read in a while.
I'm curious. What would you suggest is done with those older dogs who are in need of homes for reasons other than having been turned in/abandoned due to either agressive tendencies, or no longer being able to control their waste functions indoors. And, what will you do with the dogs that you have raised from puppyhood if/when they can no longer control their waste functions indoors for whatever reason?
 

·
Lost Her Mind
Joined
·
3,517 Posts
We adopted from a shelter a one year labrador about 20 years ago, The dog was aggressive and a biter. Knowing we were going to have children we returned the animal within one week. My sense was that an adult dog with aggressive tendencies could not be turned.
But... you didn't even try to train him? You had him a week?

****.

SHAME on that dog for not having such a genius owner like you when that dog was a puppy. Shame shame!
 

·
Daisy - my heart
Joined
·
12,575 Posts
I have to agree about the bond that develops with one-owner dogs. I've certainly experienced all that FineChina talks about in his post. Daisy is almost 9 years now, we're like an old married couple.

I am a little confused about the last comment, older dogs being let go because they start to have accidents indoors. You would have to kill me to get Daisy from me now, no matter what happens as she ages. I'm here for the remainder ... and no, I don't understand how owners can give up their senior dogs just because they are seniors. It's an absolute betrayal of your dog's trust and the bond that you've created over the years.
 

·
In the Moment
Joined
·
20,515 Posts
HHHMMMMMM, wow, what assumptions from the experience of 4 dogs. I have a feeling that HUNDREDS of cases of rescue right here on the forum will dispute your theory. I have a formerly abused springer at my feet who is a prime case.
 

·
Just Some Guy
Joined
·
296 Posts
I have raised two dogs from pups, adopted three others from breed-specific organizations, and fostered more dogs that I can count on my fingers and toes. My experience is different that what you describe.

I have found that an adopted dog really values a good home and is very much motivated to learn what they need to learn to please me and earn their part of their new family/pack. They have learned quickly and have developed the confidence to go with me to places that might surprise you. Other folks just assume that they are trained service dogs (in a way, they are), and treat them as such.

Yes, each rescued dog has issues from their past that must be overcome, but they can overcome these remnants of their early history. One dog was suspicious of males wearing hooded sweatshirts with the hood pulled up when the temperature was over 90 degrees. Huh, so am I, come to think of it. By providing support and training, this was overcome.

The thought of any of these dogs languishing in a shelter (or worse) is difficult for me. I humbly suggest that you don't know what you have been missing.
 

·
I've seen all good people
Joined
·
5,002 Posts
That's why I beleive so strongly in raising dogs from puppies. On old dogs being abandoned, I posted below that some of those dogs were let go because they could no longer control their waste functions indoors. That is a very difficult situation for a pet owner and I understand why the owners made decisions in those cases.
First off, there are many here involved in rescue or have rescued (myself included) that will disagree with you that only dogs raised from puppies "leads to a much better disciplined and happy pet and family experience." But really, you can only base this on your own personal experiences so I kinda understand where you're coming from. Thank goodness there are many families out there who don't feel the same.

Second, if my senior dog could no longer control their waste functions and no medical treatment was available I would never, ever, bring the dog to a rescue or a shelter (!!!!). The humane thing for ME to do would be to have my dog put to sleep. Tough decision? Yes. Hard to do? Yes.

For the last year and a half of his 14 year life, my husky mix had no control over his bowel movements (spinal/nerve issues) and it was always a race to get to the door in time. 95% of the time we were cleaning up poop at 3am. Honestly, if we'd have had carpet instead of Pergo on the floors we may have ended up sending him to the bridge sooner than we did. And in the end, that wasn't the reason at all.

A few months ago, my foster dog (5 years old) was adopted by a family...well, really it was the 10 year old daughter. She has cancer and adopting a rescue Golden was her "make a wish". She could have gone swimming with the dolphins, but she wanted to rescue. I pray her cancer stays in remission forever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,106 Posts
I have to wonder what exactly the point to the original post was, if in fact there was one.
 

·
Daisy - my heart
Joined
·
12,575 Posts
I want to clarify that I did not mean to minimize the relationships we have with our rescues. I have not gone that route personally, yet. I am only speaking about the strength of my relationship with Daisy ... I've had her since she was 8 weeks old. There is definitely something to be said for that. But I can easily imagine there is also a very special bond between a rescued dog and its owner ... hopefully someday I'll be able to experience it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,755 Posts
I have to agree about the bond that develops with one-owner dogs. I've certainly experienced all that FineChina talks about in his post. Daisy is almost 9 years now, we're like an old married couple.

The bond I have with Dillon is no less than had I raised him as a puppy. I think if you adopt an adult rescue Jo, your opinion would change. :)
 

·
The Missouri Crew
Joined
·
13,683 Posts
3 out of my 4 I got as puppies and Hootie is the odd man out, I got him at a year old and the op's statement is farthest from the truth. His bond with me and my family is just as strong or even stronger than the others who I got as puppies. I have seen very very strong bonds with our rescue and there families. It must be the right dog and fit for the family!
 

·
the party's crashing us
Joined
·
4,236 Posts
<<
Originally Posted by FineChina

A dog that you have not raised just does not have that personal bond imo. And you do not know their past.

Raising a dog from puppyhood creates a unique bond. You are their world.>>

Ummm...yeah.
How can you even know this? Did you clone your dog, let someone else raise the clone, then own him again and see if your bond was as strong? This is a totally impossible thing to state. You can't possibly know if you would bond as strongly to an older dog vs. puppy if it's the same dog. Every dog is different so how can you compare them.
This is a really bizarre post. So would the original poster have all older dogs in need of homes be sent of to a deserted island rather than adopting them into new homes?
Sheesh.
 

·
the party's crashing us
Joined
·
4,236 Posts
The bond I have with Dillon is no less than had I raised him as a puppy. I think if you adopt an adult rescue Jo, your opinion would change. :)

No, what she was saying was that she thought the bond between owner and dog is strongest if the person only owns one dog.
Ummmm....again...okay. I guess people with more than one child love them all less too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,628 Posts
I just have to add that I have raised 4 dogs from young puppies and out of them one was very aggressive (not her fault, her whole litter was euthed before they reached a year old, except for my dog that I kept for 10 years), one was the best dog in the whole world, one was hit by a car at 1 year old, so I don't know how she would have turned out, and my Jasmine that I have right now. Jasmine is pretty well trained, but very stubborn. She does things at her speed. She does it, but not as quickly or as eagerly as I would like. She is almost 9 years old.

Jasper was 4 1/2 months old when he came in as my foster and I adopted him. Danny was 5 months old when he came in as my foster and I adopted him. Both of them are extremely well trained and totally bonded with me (and me with them).

Oh, and Tess came in at 10 years old and lived her last 2 1/2 years with me. She and I were also totally bonded. I considered her my heart dog. She was obedient and adored me as much as I adored her.

So no, I can't see what you are saying at all. If you haven't tried it, then I am not sure how you can state something so strongly as fact. Your opinion, yes. Though I still disagree with it.
 

·
Daisy - my heart
Joined
·
12,575 Posts
No, what she was saying was that she thought the bond between owner and dog is strongest if the person only owns one dog.
Ummmm....again...okay. I guess people with more than one child love them all less too.
Huh??? No, that's not what I was saying at all. Actually, that thought never crossed my mind! Did you get confused when I said one-owner dog? Not the same as a one-dog owner :)
 
1 - 20 of 221 Posts
Top