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Sharon, I'm sorry to hear that. I hope it's nothing *important*.
 

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Oh, I so hope Casey's mass is just a watch and wait, that will cause no trouble.
 

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I had Lola in for her yearly exam yesterday... she is just turned 4. I asked the vet if doing an eye exam is important... he said most likely she would never need one and that in this area (Seattle, WA.) he has never seen the condition in all the Goldens he sees. What do YOU think I should do? I just want the best for her.
 

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I would have her checked by a veterinary opthamologist and ask his/her recommendation on follow up visits. The last recommendation I read was for pets to have a check up around 3 or 4, and then periodically after that.

General practice vets are not specialists and see only a very small percentage of a breed in one area. My own vet, who I respect a lot, misdiagnosed my girl with Horner's because he was not that familiar with it. The specialist OTOH diagnosed it immediately.

You can find listings for clinics at Orthopedic Foundation for Animals or at Dog/Canine Health Test Clinic Schedule
 

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I had Lola in for her yearly exam yesterday... she is just turned 4. I asked the vet if doing an eye exam is important... he said most likely she would never need one and that in this area (Seattle, WA.) he has never seen the condition in all the Goldens he sees. What do YOU think I should do? I just want the best for her.

I am in Seattle. When I brought Molly in for her first vet visit as a 9 week old puppy, the vet told me that starting at the age of four, I should be taking Molly to an ophthalmologist for yearly screening because she's a golden retriever and because of PU. My new vet tells me that PU is not something a general practitioner can detect. In an issue of GR News, I had read that the PNW is a hotspot for PU. A golden breeder I had talked to also said the same thing. Molly is only 2, but is going in next month for her annual visit with the ophthalmologist.
 

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where the tails wag
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This thread came up again and I feel I need to elaborate on this post.

Casey was never used for breeding, but did have eye exams. The sucker punch feeling I had walking out of that exam room that day had me torn with my options - I was in tears and several really good people helped me come to peace with my decisions that day. I knew it was not good and I 'knew' suspicious was the proper term.

It was at that point I started preparing to enjoy each and every day, even more, that my Casey chose to stay with me. This was a year after I thought I was going to lose him in Mar 2013.

He shared my life for an additional 3 months after that eye exam, happy and active to the very end ---

My point? This eye exam gave me the fore knowledge that our time together was nearing the end and I got to spoil him and enjoy him tremendously, extra hikes, extra food, helping him onto my bed each night, games, training etc, all the while knowing I would not let him suffer - he did not and chose to go with dignity and grace.

Another argument for having the exams done with our older dogs.

My dogs just had their eye exams.

Casey, who will be 13 before month end (mar 29th), has a 'suspicious' mass in the left eye. 95% of such masses are benign but it should be watched. Now at 13 years old the choices are more difficult ...
 

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Kate
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I had Lola in for her yearly exam yesterday... she is just turned 4. I asked the vet if doing an eye exam is important... he said most likely she would never need one and that in this area (Seattle, WA.) he has never seen the condition in all the Goldens he sees. What do YOU think I should do? I just want the best for her.
My regular vet where I take my Jacks... she actually had never heard of PU and promised that she would go look it up and get back with me to let me if it was a concern with Jacks (who has a lot of pigment on sclera and he has very dark eyes so couldn't tell if that pigment was JUST on the sclera).

I suspect a lot of regular vets out there who are not also golden retriever owners and involved with golden retriever clubs.... they are not going to really "get" the whole push to have yearly eye checks with these dogs.

Even other breed people are "surprised" by the huge turnouts when the local golden retriever club has a eye clinic. In the opinion of other breed people, you only have the eye cerfs done if you are breeding the dog. And that's just a 1 time thing.

But long schpeel short - I'd have the eyes checked around 1-2 years to check for cataracts or any conditions like that.

Age 3+ - yearly cerfs to check for any eye cysts or development of PU is important.

Eye cerf = $35-45 bucks. Probably cheaper than most vet visits. ;)
 

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I went to an awesome talk given at our local veterinary ophthalmologist this week for our club.

She showed us plenty of pictures of what different conditions looked like and what the prognosis would be and the importance of OFA testing the eyes. I guess they no longer use CERF. She explained how most of the breeder options are nothing to worry about. And of course the pain that a dog with PU is in if it turns into glaucoma.

The number one thing she emphasized was if you think anything is going on, see a vet ophthalmologist immediately. It can save their sight.

We also had a tour of her facility, operating room, etc.
 

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I am taking four of my five to the local kennel clinic eye clinic on Sunday, and I was able to convince some of our pet golden clients to screen eyes too. I think once people understand the dangers, they will jump right in and participate, but I agree PU is unknown to the general public or even general practice vets. My Copley has a bad case, but my vet cant see much with her regular equipment, and only the specialist can even see the problems in his eyes.
 

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Next year, I even think I will gather the Lush pups in the local area aand take them for Cerfs too at my expense. Treatment goes such a long way with PU.
 

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Our practice sent out a flyer to more than three hundred clients with Goldens this Spring to emphasize the importance of annual eye exams for ANY dog, rather breeding ,etc... Only three owners showed up...
 

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I was dreading this years exam as Fiona showed very early signs of PU at last years clinic. She recently turned 12 last week and thankfully there has been absolutely no change for the worse. Dr Marrion is wonderful, answers all questions, no rushing, a real pro and well regarded by many. Doing a happy dance here :)

Really surprised only 3 people showed Janice. There must have been a hundred dogs at the one I went to, plenty of other dogs besides Goldens. For a 35 dollar clinic to see a DAVCO I don't know why more people take advantage of it. I pay almost twice that to see my regular vet.

If anyone wonders about the change in the form here is a FAQ. The changes surprised me at first now being called the Companion Animal Eye Registry. Glad they got rid of all the fill in the circle stuff on the old form :)

Orthopedic Foundation for Animals
 

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Kate
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Really surprised only 3 people showed - For a 35 dollar clinic to see a DAVCO I don't know why more people take advantage of it. I pay almost twice that to see my regular vet.
I think the reason is a lot of people pinch pennies when it comes to stuff they don't think is necessary or important. And from dog training to practical health a lot of people will pinch pennies like you'd never believe.

*** Other reason is probably less critical. I never do health clinics at shows or even when offered by the local golden club. Simply because I prefer to take my guys to the guy I always take them to.
 

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I'm waiting to confirm Bear's eye appointment. Down here we're quoted $95 for the exam unless they see something and then we could rack up a few hundred. I'm nervous as all get out.

Though, another reason people don't go is because there seems to be serious lack of communication and education. My vet didn't advocate for any eye screening. And the receptionist for the local ophthalmologist was surprised I was bring my 2 year old in when he has no symptoms or signs of a problem.

Luckily husband agrees $95/year to try to catch a possibly serious problem is totally worth it.
 

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Well when I called i asked for an exam for PU since it's common in GR and they told me their exam prices are all the same flat $95 unless they need additional diagnostic tests.
 

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So glad that you are having them checked!!
 

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Kate
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Well when I called i asked for an exam for PU since it's common in GR and they told me their exam prices are all the same flat $95 unless they need additional diagnostic tests.
When you call - ask for OFA's.

I just took our collie in to have a specialist check his eyes which are starting to get foggy. <- I was pretty sure it was NS (old age stuff), but since collies have more eye issues than goldens even - I wanted the specialist to check them out. That cost me about $120 (regular exam). OFA's same place are $45.
 
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