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I need help with how to deal with our new puppy and her stubbornness. Each day as we walk through our woods, on a leash, I have to tell her the same "no" and "leave it", same things, same places, she just wants to eat the moss or dig that hole or eat that deer poop. I have been consistent, but still she goes after it, why? What else can I do?
I insist that she doesn't pull up the grass, everyday we go through her playing nicely and then it starts, the grass pulling and the discipline which ends in me removing her from the grassy area. Each day she will not allow me to have the dishwasher open without trying to clean the dishes for me, each day I tell her leave it and still she licks, I feel like at 15 weeks she should have that figured out.
Another issue we have that I am so confused with is the leash, we have to have her on the leash all the time when she is outside, so I let her lead sometimes and I follow, so she can explore, then I want to train her to walk nice on the leash and that must be confusing her because she isn't doing anything I ask.
She needs exercise to help release some of that puppy energy and I can't walk you very far at all.
She is super distracted, she will sit,stay,come and leave it just fine until any distraction, I am praying this will get better as she matures.
Am I expecting to much progress from her too early, I had a different experience with my first Golden.
Thanks so much for your help and words of wisdom.
 

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I think at that age she's just acting like a puppy. I don't think that the letting her lead thing is a good idea though. She needs consistency (especially at this young age) and allowing her to be the leader part of the time is just going to make the leash training more difficult for both of you. If you stop somewhere and allow her to sniff around that's one thing but, I would do my best to work on being the one calling the shots while you are walking. It will help prevent pulling in the future.
 

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She is not being stubborn, she is a baby. She is nowhere near old enough to "get" all these things.

If she has to be on leash all the time, get a 30 or 50 ft lead and let her have some running room. Keep the walking leash for walks where you keep her next to you.

Please be patient, 15 weeks is really a baby and she will learn all of this over time, but she isn't old enough to know it all yet. I wouldn't expect her to stop all the puppyness until she is close to a year old, and even then she will still act like a puppy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
trying hard not to compare her to my last golden puppy but really don't have any other way of judging, except your comments. I know she is young and thank you for your time and comments and suggestions. The leash is a big concern, I do have a really long lead, it will be hard to manage because we live in the woods and there are lots of things for her to get hung up on. We used an invisible fence with our last golden but I feel she is too young to train on that yet, even though the company says 3 months.
New day, its all good. Lets go play! Thanks again everyone for your support.
 

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What I always tried to do was separate "lead walking" from exercise walking. It helps to have a totally different lead setup for each. For exercise, a long training leader and get them more interested in retrieving, running or chasing a ball. It burns off energy.
Walking on lead is a training exercise. Start from sitting at heel and get them used to stepping off with you. My goal was small steps and praising good performance and constant attention to me. Every time the nose starts to go toward sniffing the ground a gentle quick tug and "watch me" correction and "good boy".
Keep it short and often. Two minutes of good loose leash walking and lots of praise, then switch to longer lead and let them explore.
The idea is to reinforce good lead training and to find a way to differentiate lead walking from playtime.
 

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What I always tried to do was separate "lead walking" from exercise walking. It helps to have a totally different lead setup for each. For exercise, a long training leader and get them more interested in retrieving, running or chasing a ball. It burns off energy.
Walking on lead is a training exercise. Start from sitting at heel and get them used to stepping off with you. My goal was small steps and praising good performance and constant attention to me. Every time the nose starts to go toward sniffing the ground a gentle quick tug and "watch me" correction and "good boy".
Keep it short and often. Two minutes of good loose leash walking and lots of praise, then switch to longer lead and let them explore.
The idea is to reinforce good lead training and to find a way to differentiate lead walking from playtime.
I also use different leads for different things. Ella knows what we're going to do depending on which lead I pull out.

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She is a beautiful girl! Love the picture of her. Dishwashers are an open invitation for dogs. The smell of food and right at their height.

Have you thought about a puppy obedience class? They are so helpful and you'll find that other people are going through the exact same things as you are with your puppy. A little obedience goes a long way.

As the others have mentioned, she is a puppy. :)
 

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Oh, my goodness. Shala is 11 months old, and I still have to remind her to leave it or drop it every single day on walks. That is not a puppy stubbornness thing - that's just a Golden Retriever thing! :) I sort of consider it my responsibility to keep an eye out and make sure she doesn't eat stuff she shouldn't. Have some treats with you and teach a good leave it and drop it.
 

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I need help with how to deal with our new puppy and her stubbornness. Each day as we walk through our woods, on a leash, I have to tell her the same "no" and "leave it", same things, same places, she just wants to eat the moss or dig that hole or eat that deer poop. I have been consistent, but still she goes after it, why? What else can I do?
I insist that she doesn't pull up the grass, everyday we go through her playing nicely and then it starts, the grass pulling and the discipline which ends in me removing her from the grassy area. Each day she will not allow me to have the dishwasher open without trying to clean the dishes for me, each day I tell her leave it and still she licks, I feel like at 15 weeks she should have that figured out.
Another issue we have that I am so confused with is the leash, we have to have her on the leash all the time when she is outside, so I let her lead sometimes and I follow, so she can explore, then I want to train her to walk nice on the leash and that must be confusing her because she isn't doing anything I ask.
She needs exercise to help release some of that puppy energy and I can't walk you very far at all.
She is super distracted, she will sit,stay,come and leave it just fine until any distraction, I am praying this will get better as she matures.
Am I expecting to much progress from her too early, I had a different experience with my first Golden.
Thanks so much for your help and words of wisdom.
She won't figure out anything on her own. You need to teach her how to be a good dog. For something like the dishwasher, you can try teaching her to sit and stay while you load it. But it's not a simple thing. Again, Shala and I are still working on that one - all those yummy dirty dishes are a big temptation! But she won't choose not to lick them on her own. I need to have her sit and reward her often for not licking them for her to learn not to. She is different from my first dog, who never tried to lick the dishes. So I know what you're talking about when you say your pup is diferent from your last dog. But they all have their little things - you just have to help them learn to make the right choices.

Is there a fenced-in park where you can take her to play off leash safely? She probably does have a lot of puppy energy, and she will be happier and easier to teach if she gets a chance to run and play.
 
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