Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
My real name is Mercy
Joined
·
455 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
To All More Experienced Golden Parents,

I'm asking for suggestions to end a "behavior problem" that I believe is only normal puppy behavior, but has definitely become an issue. I'm praying that the intensity of this will stop as he ages, but I need to at least tone it down it now.

Max is almost constantly chasing and (playfully) nipping and "attacking" our smaller dog, Rascal. I realize that he's being playful and has no intent to harm her, (he never has), but she is very stressed and after a time or ten around the house, she's had enough and tries her best to get him to back off of her. The problem is that he will not stop. He's like the energizer bunny! She nips at his ears, lunges near his face and basically goes off on him barking and swatting, trying to get him to leave her alone, but this works for only a moment and he's after her again.

He's 4 1/2 months old and is only an inch or two taller than her right now, but he outweighs her by at least 35 lbs. He frequently jumps on top of her and swats her with his (now very large) paws and I'm concerned that she'll be accidently injured. She's only about 10 lbs., (about the size of a small toy poodle), high-strung, and absolutely trembles with fear after these episodes. :uhoh: I'm truly worried about her health, otherwise I'd just tolerate it a while longer & hope he calms down a little soon.

BTW, getting them both to sit and calm down, trying to distract him with other "toys" or chews, and correcting his behavior on leash haven't worked. Since he is now big enough to also chase her up onto our bed, there is no longer any safe haven areas for her in the house. Any suggestions to help me stop or tone down this activity? (Other than crating him, I mean?!) ;)

Help! Thank you!
- Trids
 

·
chew chew chew
Joined
·
3,571 Posts
If your little dog can jump up onto the couch, or bed, just don't let the little blonde terror follow. If he hops up to bug, then just take him off and give him something else to do, like a kong with a treat inside, a toy, bone... pretty soon he'll start to figure out that when she jumps up on the couch, it's time for him to go chew something and leave her alone.

Lana
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
I would sugest crating. Not for a long time just like 10 min. He starts to go off and she tells him enough back her up with a command and if he dosent remove him either to a differnt room or crate. You don't listen=no more fun. I would also work on stays. Using a treat or toy have him sit for progressivly longer time before he gets a reward. Work on teaching a settle command seperate form these episodes so he knows what you mean. Work on things that emphysize self control and listening when excited.
 

·
My real name is Mercy
Joined
·
455 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Lana,
I've been trying this with very limited success. Unfortunately, he's much more interested in "attacking" her on the bed & couch than he is in any treat or toy. :bowl: But I'll keep trying!
 

·
Tracer, Rumor & Cady
Joined
·
10,683 Posts
Puppies can be such a pain in the neck for some adult dogs....

Ive used time-outs pretty successfully with a dog (Elliot) that liked to body slam - he would run full speed and slam into other dogs. IMHO not safe play behavior....

When he would start the behavior (start running directly toward another dog) - I would say "Hey!" and he would slow down enough where I could slip a slip-lead over his head...I would march him off away from the other dogs (just outside the fence...). Wait with him for a couple of minutes...then let him back in to play....
He would ramp up again....I would verbally mark the behavior with "Hey!" - go to him and slip the lead over his head and march him back to time out...

It took a couple of days (maybe a week or so) of consistency then I could say "Hey!" and he would stop running and decide that he would not slam so he could stay and play....

Certainly the same technique could be used with a puppy...
 

·
My real name is Mercy
Joined
·
455 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I would sugest crating. Not for a long time just like 10 min. He starts to go off and she tells him enough back her up with a command and if he dosent remove him either to a differnt room or crate. You don't listen=no more fun. I would also work on stays. Using a treat or toy have him sit for progressivly longer time before he gets a reward. Work on teaching a settle command seperate form these episodes so he knows what you mean. Work on things that emphysize self control and listening when excited.
Thanks, Bizzy - that sounds like good advice. One question - "settle command" meaning something other than "stay"? Thank you!
 

·
My real name is Mercy
Joined
·
455 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ive used time-outs pretty successfully with a dog (Elliot) that liked to body slam - he would run full speed and slam into other dogs. IMHO not safe play behavior....

When he would start the behavior (start running directly toward another dog) - I would say "Hey!" and he would slow down enough where I could slip a slip-lead over his head...I would march him off away from the other dogs (just outside the fence...). Wait with him for a couple of minutes...then let him back in to play....
He would ramp up again....I would verbally mark the behavior with "Hey!" - go to him and slip the lead over his head and march him back to time out...

It took a couple of days (maybe a week or so) of consistency then I could say "Hey!" and he would stop running and decide that he would not slam so he could stay and play....

Certainly the same technique could be used with a puppy...
That's exactly what's happening - that "slamming" behavior along with paw swats & nipping! Your suggestion sounds helpful. I've tried using his leash and moving him to another room or forcing him into a sit, (or just "checking" the leash) but seeing the leash only seems to indicate going for a walk and so he misses the point completely. Rascal also gets excited at the sight of the leash, so I gave up using it to correct this behavior. Perhaps a slip-lead and a time out in another room would have a different result. I feel so bad for her, trying to take him on 24/7 herself, since we haven't been able to break him of it! Thanks so much LibertyME, I'll try this.

- Trids
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,423 Posts
Tango is way too assertive for Tally at times, "waterskiing" on his tail to slow him down and knocking him over(she's 55 lbs, he's 68 lbs, it's all personality) but he never sets limits for her. I started telling her "Enough" in a serious, low voice and holding her collar for a sec. Then, I'd redirect her with a stick or ball(she's fetch crazy). Now it's programmed into her pea-sized brain, and when she is getting amped up and reved up, she checks herself and goes to pick up a stick on her own. I really sympathize with you, bc it's sad to see the other dog become overwhelemed yet your pup is just a silly baby still. Does your golden pup get enough exersise to really tire him out every day? I truly believe some young goldens needs at least an off-leash hour of running and playing to be sane house dogs. Is it possible to babygate them apart just to give rascal a breather when she needs it? How about playdates with other, bigger-but nice -dogs to teach him some doggy manners with Rascal?
 

·
Humankind. Be both.
Joined
·
7,650 Posts
I physically kept Quiz away from my older dog when he was a puppy. They had limited play time. I wanted thim to learn that she didn't exist to be his personal play thing. Worked wonders. Crates, tethers, baby gates, x-pens, etc. They spent more time apart than together. As a result, he learned to entertain himself with toys and she learned that she could peacefully coexist with the little red monkey. They play, but it's not ALL he thinks about doing when they're together. I prefer it that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
913 Posts
Any chance you could setup a baby gate slighty elevated off the floor that she can easily get under, buy he'd have some trouble with? Setup a room like this so she can escape him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,755 Posts
Maybe one of the more knowledgeable can chime in here but, I would also think the problem will get a little better as Max gets a bit older too... I mean, yes definitely work with him training-wise based on the suggestions you've gotten now, but there is really nothing more exuberant and playful than a young puppy, and as he gains some maturity he should be able to calm himself down a lot easier. I think with constant reinforcement of what behaviors are acceptable and which are not, and a little more maturity that comes with age, you can definitely overcome this problem!
 

·
Tracer, Rumor & Cady
Joined
·
10,683 Posts
As always Stephanie...well put....
 

·
Boudiga
Joined
·
4,102 Posts
Any chance you could setup a baby gate slighty elevated off the floor that she can easily get under, buy he'd have some trouble with? Setup a room like this so she can escape him.
i like this idea - it'd be nice for her to have a safe haven
 

·
My real name is Mercy
Joined
·
455 Posts
Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Does your golden pup get enough exersise to really tire him out every day? I truly believe some young goldens needs at least an off-leash hour of running and playing to be sane house dogs. Is it possible to babygate them apart just to give rascal a breather when she needs it? How about playdates with other, bigger-but nice -dogs to teach him some doggy manners with Rascal?
The short answer is no, I don't think he's getting enough exercise. Plenty of fetch in a fairly big yard and a walk after I get home from work, but obviously, it's not enough to tire him out sufficiently. Definitely gonna get a baby-gate though! Maybe one she can get through and he can't...hmmmm...

Some time with other big dogs, but THEN he's a perfect gentleman!

Thanks Ljilly28!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,755 Posts
Maybe he would benefit from going to a doggy daycare a couple times a week? It would give him both some additional exercise and also he will get to learn some doggie manners playing with the other dogs there.
 

·
My real name is Mercy
Joined
·
455 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Maybe he would benefit from going to a doggy daycare a couple times a week? It would give him both some additional exercise and also he will get to learn some doggie manners playing with the other dogs there.
THERE'S an idea! One just opened near me....I'll have to check on prices. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,889 Posts
Speaking as someone who had a 'body slammer' pup..... thankfully they do get better, but mine will still take my other dog clean off her feet at a full gallop if she's not watching!!

I think a baby gate is definitely your answer here. Your other dog deserves some peace when she wants it, and the puppy cannot see your other dog as her plaything.

I don't think any puppy should be exercised too much when young... never good for growing joints, but do you only exercise when you come home from work? I would suggest getting up a little earlier and giving the pup a change of scenery by way of a walk before you go to work, this will give you a chance to practice and reinforce training on a 1:1 basis. You should do this after work also. Two 30 minute sessions is better than one block of 60 minutes.

Golden retrievers can be extremely high energy dogs... but of course you're finding that out right now aren't you:)

Playdates with similar size puppies but more importantly older dogs who will 'teach' the pup appropriate behaviour is a good idea. Just make sure the older dogs aren't too rough or intolerant, and this should help.

Good luck, I hope you find a way to sort this.
Tanya
 

·
My real name is Mercy
Joined
·
455 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I think a baby gate is definitely your answer here. Your other dog deserves some peace when she wants it, and the puppy cannot see your other dog as her plaything.

I don't think any puppy should be exercised too much when young... never good for growing joints, but do you only exercise when you come home from work? I would suggest getting up a little earlier and giving the pup a change of scenery by way of a walk before you go to work, this will give you a chance to practice and reinforce training on a 1:1 basis. You should do this after work also. Two 30 minute sessions is better than one block of 60 minutes.

Golden retrievers can be extremely high energy dogs... but of course you're finding that out right now aren't you:)

Playdates with similar size puppies but more importantly older dogs who will 'teach' the pup appropriate behaviour is a good idea. Just make sure the older dogs aren't too rough or intolerant, and this should help.

Good luck, I hope you find a way to sort this.
Tanya
I agree, Rascal not only has the right to some peace, but I'm beginning to believe her health depends on it. You're right, "My Plaything" is exactly how he's treating her. I see a baby gate in the very near future!

Thanks for the tips. My DH is supposed to be exercising Max during the day while I'm at work, but it's not happening (for several reasons). I'll see what I can do about getting an extra walk in before work...(I leave my house by 6:30 a.m., so that will be a bit of a challenge dragging myself out of bed EVEN earlier). :D

Thanks Tanya!
- Trids
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top