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Hello, we have a golden who is 10 weeks old now. A few more issues that have come forth and I have trouble wrapping my head around it.

1. He growls at me when I say no, and seems to protest everytime I scold him. It seems like the no word has no value to him.

2. He does not do this to my husband, but to me. He will sporadically come and start tugging at my pants and then even jumping at my legs trying to grab me. I hold still at times, and today I even tried to move towards him to stop him, it did not seem to work, unfortunately. I imagine its his invitation to play maybe, but it seems so rough and nothing is happening.

3. I have started to give him treats for leaving his leash alone, and also doing exactly what I ask of him, but it seems he is ALWAYS just looking for treats around me, watching my hands, or licking my hands whenever I bring them close to his face.

4. Lastly, the only thing that worked today was the change I had in a metal box/container, and shaking that got him distracted and stopped doing what he is doing.

Not sure what this will be, but any help from this community will probably guide me in the right direction.
 

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My advice is to do some reading on modern methods of dog training. Then when old enough get into a Basic Manners class.
I am not sure that scolding a 10 week old puppy is the best way at this point. At 10 weeks my puppy was in a crate and let out for potty then back in the crate. Maybe some play time before going back in the house.
 

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So how do you tell your dog no for something? I have tried redirecting which works in some situations. But sometimes when you possibly cannot redirect, do you let your dog continue and not tell them no? Sorry that sounds a bit confusing to me.

Although I do see that puppies this young don't understand the no, and get confused. But, he seems to understand and stop when my husband says no, however when I say no he ignores.
 

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And are you saying that puppy should not have play time inside the house? It seems like a lot of hours of crating if you just take them out for potty breaks with some playtime and then back in crate...
 

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To be honest with you I spend the puppy's earliest weeks working toward this goal: house breaking. My dogs are 100% reliable. Yes, I do give a lot of crate time but I accomplish my goal. Another goal is a gradual introduction to an older dog in the house, just a couple minutes at a time. Add to this furniture that does not get destroyed.
As far as scolding a 10 week old goes, you risk a few things. You see you may get a dog that feels cowed by you. Do not forget that you have a puppy. Would you scold an infant? It sounds like he is already reacting to you in an unwanted way. And you said yourself that the word "No" has no value to him. "No" can be powerful and in my opinion should be used sparingly. It sounds like you are not using it sparingly and maybe even have taught him its irrelevance.
Of course your puppy is trying to play with you. That is what puppies do. You will need to let him know what is inappropriate, like what hurts. Most everything else is just play. Try playing with him and take the opportunity to introduce a "Game over" cue.
Leash biting and giving him treats for leaving it alone---careful with this one. However if you feel successful with this one continue what you are doing. Don't bribe the dog and don't build biting the leash inadvertently into a treat reward.
He is always just looking for treats around you? Sounds like you have a dog that is giving you lots of attention. There are obedience people that would love that. You may have a good candidate for some performance events.

One of the best books for you IMO is THE CULTURE CLASH by Jean Donaldson. After reading this book I changed a lot of my ideas on dog behavior and training. It is available in paperback and is good reading. I get my copies on Amazon and have given it to my puppy people.

Good luck with your puppy and would love to hear updates.
 

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All this information is very helpful! Thank you so much. I'll definitely look into that book and come back with hopefully some positive updates.
 

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I think some good advice I got was don't just tell them no, tell them what you want them to do. Dogs don't generalize well so the word doesn't make sense from situation to situation. Your husband's deeper voice may just be enough to redirect him. I was amazed at how quickly Rukie learned sit and down commands. I think it was within a week or so of getting him at 8 weeks old. Then when he starts doing something you don't want you can tell him to sit. Running through a quick set of sit, down, touch my hand helped calm him down. We did keep tiny treats in our pockets all the time. The book The Power of Positive Dog Training gives good step by step directions for teaching things like sit and down The Power of Positive Dog Training: Miller, Pat: 8601410979904: Amazon.com: Books

Also get him plenty of exercise. If you have a yard let him run around just dragging the leash so you can catch him if necessary. Play by calling him back and forth with your husband and rewarding when he does. 10-20 weeks seemed the hardest to me but if you keep practicing, training, and being patient it starts getting better. Another reminder I found helpful was remembering how many days old the are. At 10 weeks he's only been around 70 days so even though they grow big so fast they are just little babies. Puppy classes are essential and if you take him it will teach him to respect you and build a great bond. Hang in there.
 

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Hello, we have a golden who is 10 weeks old now. A few more issues that have come forth and I have trouble wrapping my head around it.

1. He growls at me when I say no, and seems to protest everytime I scold him. It seems like the no word has no value to him.

2. He does not do this to my husband, but to me. He will sporadically come and start tugging at my pants and then even jumping at my legs trying to grab me. I hold still at times, and today I even tried to move towards him to stop him, it did not seem to work, unfortunately. I imagine its his invitation to play maybe, but it seems so rough and nothing is happening.

3. I have started to give him treats for leaving his leash alone, and also doing exactly what I ask of him, but it seems he is ALWAYS just looking for treats around me, watching my hands, or licking my hands whenever I bring them close to his face.

4. Lastly, the only thing that worked today was the change I had in a metal box/container, and shaking that got him distracted and stopped doing what he is doing.

Not sure what this will be, but any help from this community will probably guide me in the right direction.
A few suggestions:

Your question 1: I agree with gdgli, you shouldn't be scolding a 10-week old puppy. He's not behaving badly, he just hasn't learned to live in the human world yet. It's up to you to teach him. You're correct in saying the word "no" has no value to him. There are several reasons for this. First, it's a human word, not a dog word, so you can't expect him to know what it means. Second, IMHO it's a completely useless command. "No" is a word that humans use in all kinds of contexts, for all kinds of reasons. It doesn't just have one meaning, it has lots of meanings. For example, you may use it to tell the dog: to stop biting your legs, to get off the couch, not to jump on visitors, not to steal food from the counter, not to chew furniture, etc. The puppy can't possibly know what you mean. With my dogs, I use a different system. Instead of saying "no", I use "ah-ah" to signal that I don't like what they're doing, and combine it with a command saying what I want them to do instead. For example, the dog jumps up at me: "ah-ah, sit". The "ah-ah" tells the dog I don't like that he's jumping up, and the "sit" tells him what I want him to do. Or the dog grabs something I don't want him to have: "ah-ah, drop it". And so on. Of course, this only works when you've taught the alternative behaviours. There's no point telling a 10-week old puppy "ah-ah, sit" if you haven't yet taught him to sit. But you can start using "ah-ah" to signal behaviour you don't like, and physically remove him from the situation - for example by picking him up and putting him in his crate for a few minutes.

Your question 2: If you don't want him to do this, use the "ah-ah" to signal that you don't like his behaviour, then pick him up and put him in his crate for a few minutes. You need to deal with this proactively. Standing still isn't being proactive: he's still doing what he wants, and you're suffering the consequences. It should be the other way round. Until you've done some basic training of commands you can use as alternative behaviour (sit, lie down, etc.), use the crate.

Your question 3: I also agree with gdgli that you have to be careful using treats for leaving the leash alone because if you do it incorrectly you might inadvertently train him to grab the leash and drop it.

Your question 4: I personally would not use this type of approach with a young puppy. Your job as a dog owner is to be more interesting that whatever the pup is focusing on. Start being a fun owner! He clearly likes to tug: so play tug games with him, and use it as an opportunity to teach the "end of the game" command and the "drop it" command. Or play any other interactive game - retrieving, finding stuff, exchanging a toy for a treat, that kind of thing. I have a special "treat bag" for training sessions, which I keep in the fridge. It's full of cheese bits, cooked chicken, that kind of thing. My pups quickly learn that the appearance of the bag means a fun training session with great rewards. My current dog is now 4 years old, and he still comes running when he sees me taking the bag out of the fridge. Right now you're just yelling at the pup and being frustrated with him. He needs to learn that humans equal fun.

If you haven't already done so, I would suggest looking round for a good training school that teaches humans how to train dogs using mostly positive methods. A good trainer will show you how to create a relationship with your dog where you make the decisions and he does what you want.

Best of luck! Hope you find solutions that work for you.
 
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Frustrating little buggers aren't they? Remember this pup is like a new born baby. You wouldn't expect a newborn to understand what no means, puppy doesn't know what this word means either. In fact this baby doesn't speak people at all... sit, down, go outside, come here, none of this has any meaning at all. You haven't taught him the action that goes with the words yet.
kikopup has really great puppy youtube videos on teaching manners, see if they help. She shows how to time giving the treat so it's a reward and not a bribe. She also shows you how to have treats in your hand and discourage the pup from mugging you.
You have already been given good advice all I can add is you will be far more effective with the puppy if you teach this baby the behavior you want vs trying to control or discourage the behavior you don't want. He is being a puppy and doing the puppy behaviors he used with this littermates.... it's really the only behavior he knows so far. Learn how to think puppy and how to teach your puppy people talk. Communication, consistency and compromise will get you through. Do as much as you can when they are young, in a few months you are going to have a 50+ lb dog still wanting to be a puppy so train now!
 

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This is a great article to put things in perspective.

 
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