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I hope this shows what I want it to show. Pheasant cover I love to hunt, I get an adrenaline rush when a cackling bird flushes out of this, grass suddenly parting with me trying to get footing for a good shot. Grass is 4+ feet high, picture taken from inside my truck. Would you have your Golden or any flushing dog sit to flush?

 

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cwag




Very funny, I will be more careful in the future.:grin2:
I have to admit I thought maybe that some kind of "doggie flushing toilet", had been invented!. No offence, to your serioue thread meant!.
 

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Absolutely. I want him sitting and concentrating on where the bird falls. I posted previously about how dogs can readily determine where a bird went down even if they can't see it.
 
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Jay S.
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Sit to flush (with steady to shot) for a variety of reasons:

1. Keep the dog safe and in generally away from where the bird will be shot.
2. Keeps the dog in control in case the bird jumped near or flew over a barbed wire fence. Bird can be shot and if the dog is steady to shot can be safely positioned to the other side of the fence to make the retrieve. Obviously, if the bird is missed there is no recall needed. You are ready to start hunting immediately.
3. When working a brace of dogs you can send the dog you choose to make the retrieve. For example: the dog in the cover may have flushed the bird but the dog in the clear marked the fall.

With this said, things are never perfect. The cover you show is tall so it may be tough for your dog to see the bird fall. However, that is where a blind and/or hunting dead comes into play. IMO, the safety of steadiness far outweighs the additional work it may take to find the fallen bird.
 

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Maggie'sVoice


Lincgold


OK, you people are killing me!!! And you know what? I didn't even think about it when creating the thread.
Well you have got me laughing.
 

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I have a yes and no answer. I think in heavy cover (probably even thicker than your picture) not requiring a sit to flush gives the dog an advantage when going after the bird. This is especially helpful when going after wild birds, which in my experience always seem to run when they hit the ground. Therefore the dog is already on their trail when the hit the ground.
That being said I am currently working with my younger female dog on a sit to flush. Primarily because I am thinking of running some HRC and Spaniel AKC tests with her.
I do believe both will work but in very heavy cover with wild birds the sit to flush puts the dogs at a disadvantage.
 

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IMO a dog should always sit on the flush. In heavy cover it is unlikely that a breaking dog will be able to mark a fall and it can't mark multiple falls.

When you find yourself hunting near a road, barbwire fence or any other hazard you will be glad your dog is steady to flush.
 

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Hey you, hi!


I have a yes and no answer. I think in heavy cover (probably even thicker than your picture) not requiring a sit to flush gives the dog an advantage when going after the bird. This is especially helpful when going after wild birds, which in my experience always seem to run when they hit the ground. Therefore the dog is already on their trail when the hit the ground.
That being said I am currently working with my younger female dog on a sit to flush. Primarily because I am thinking of running some HRC and Spaniel AKC tests with her.
I do believe both will work but in very heavy cover with wild birds the sit to flush puts the dogs at a disadvantage.
 

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I have one dog in each camp. One sits (or stops) on the flush, the other will not. The one that does, takes longer to find his bird. The one that doesn't sit, is chasing the bird as it flushes, then when its shot, she's right on top of it.

With birds that fly low on a flush, sitting is important because you don't want to hit the dog. so pen raised birds are best for this type of dog.
For dogs that chase and the birds are strong flyers, then you want a dog that chases. Wild birds are better for this type of dog.

Both dogs need to be under control and come back when called. Both need to be tenacious when hunting for shot birds.


once a dog has learned to chase, its very difficult to "fix" that behavior. If you want to get that behavior (sit or stop on flush) ,do not set birds for the dog until you are solid on whistle sit.
 

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This thread is very informative, for someone like me having very little field/hunting experience. I was thinking the sit or stop would be best for safety. But Stacey explained very well how both types work in differet situations. I also originally though teaching a dog to use a toilet and flush, ha ha!
 

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