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Zoey's Mom
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Discussion Starter #1
My puppy pickup is scheduled for next week and I'm so excited an anxious to do everything perfectly!

My breeder is going to be about a 2.5 hour ride each way, so should I bring a crate or carrier for her or will some towels suffice? An accident wouldn't be a huge deal as my car seats can easily be cleaned... I just don't want 2.5 hours of whining when the puppy poops on a kid's lap!

Is it really that important or am I crazy for overthinking this?!
 

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i would recommend a crate. cover the crate with a blanket so the puppy can't see anything. usually depending on the age the puppy should sleep threw the whole drive. its much safer to leave him in the crate and much less stress full for the puppy . email me if you have any other questions [email protected]
 

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Yes!!!! :) I always recommend that people bring a crate with them. You will also want to bring an extra towel for in the crate(in case he gets sick or has an accident. Put some interesting things to occupy him in the crate and then of course, some paper towels, a baggie, a leash and his collar(In case you need to stop for any reason) and a great big SMILE!!!

It is too hard to try to hold a puppy for a 2.5 hr car ride home and the puppy could get carsick or have an accident and goodness forbid, if anything were to happen, the best and safest place for the baby is in the crate.

Just a reminder though-NEVER put baby in the crate with a collar on.

ENJOY!!!!!:eek:
 

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Zoey's Mom
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Discussion Starter #4
The problem is I don't have a crate that's small enough to fit in the backseat or even in the trunk (we have a hatchback). We got a big one with a divider to last us when she grows up. I do have a regular cat carrier but I don't want to lock the poor baby in that tiny thing and have that be her first experience with a crate. What would you suggest I do?
 

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How large is the cat carrier?? Many times they are large enough for a puppy to ride home in and we have certainly had a few of our puppies go home in those. The puppy will on average weigh between 9-12 lbs when they go to their new homes. So, you don't need a huge crate for him.

Also, ask friends, neighbors, family members and even co-workers. You just never know what someone has in their garage or attic that they would be willing to let you borrow. :)

If worst comes to worst, Wal-Mart does sell small crates for about $25 that will fit the puppy with no problem and also fit in your car with no issue. I know it is an added expense there, but you will be much happier with the puppy in a crate on the ride home.
 

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I would second the use of a crate and covering it on the way home.I would suggest you take the puppy out about halfway and let him relieve himself. Their bladders and intestines are not that large at that age.. Also put some paper in the bottom incase their is an accident to aid in cleanup. And remember, sanitary hand wipes are your friend to help clean the cage if he has a poop incident so he is not filthy when you get him home. However, I would avoid the typical places like gas stations and fast food restaurants and regular state highway rest stops because of the chance of parvo

HVgoldens4 is right. You can pick up a small carrier that will fit in the back seat of most cars fairly cheap at Walmart or even online. The other advantage we have found is that small puppies may tend to get car sick on longer rides if they can see out. Hope this helps. We brought our boy home on what would normally have been a seven hour drive and just stopped every 1.5-2 hours. We had one accident because of the stupid humans driving who for got to account for the time spent in traffic between two of the rest stops. Other than that, no problems but the sanitary wipes made cleanup easy. Oh and in case of a problem bring a garbage sack you can put the dirty things in at the first gas station. Not a pleasant smell for two hours. LOL!
 

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You can probably get a cardboard pet carrier at the pet store or the local shelter or see if someone you know has a cat carrier. Most people who take their cats to the vet do. We brought Jaro home, two hours, just in the backseat with me holding him. But maybe not in the backseat alone with children only.
 

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I was wondering about this too because I definitely want to bring the puppy home in a crate for safety reason and have a big 36 inch plastic airline crate and a tiny cat carrier on hand. I think the cat carrier is 19.0 " L x 12.6 " W x 12.6 " H, for "small pets up to 8-10" tall. As long as I can fit the big crate in the car, I'm bringing that.

I really wish I'd originally gotten a medium size carrier for our kitten, then we wouldn't have to worry about how to get the puppy home.
 

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Apollo & Knightley's mum!
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I bought a cheap fabric pop up crate online which was puppy sized. We used it in the car for the first several trips until I got time to do car training with him, and I also put it beside our bed for the first month we had him, so it was easier to take him out in the night, and to ease him into our life here. It was cheap but lasted fine, and now I have passed it onto a family member for exactly the same thing all over again.

We had a 3 hour trip back after picking him up, and stopped once, careful to pick a place that received lots of sunlight (parvo can't survive UV exposure but survives in the shade for up to a year) and well away from where people would usually go. We gave him a small sip of water, and then off we went again. He'd already traveled 4 hours that morning, and the breeder hadn't fed him anything because pups that young often get car sickness, so he was fine.... but if your pup has eaten that day, watch out for car sickness and keep clean up materials on hand.

I sat in the back with the crate, just staring at the sleeping puppy in the crate.... absolutely and completely in shock that we HAD A PUPPY. It all passed so quickly, I miss that fuzzy little baby.
 

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Dr. Rainheart
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I brought a crate I borrowed from work but I didn't need it. We had a 6 hour ride home and he just slept on the seat next to me.
 

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Nancy
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I've never had a crate small enough to fit in the car, with Hank, he was a surprise for my birthday so I held him, with Maggie (RIP) I took a wash basket lined with old towels. Years ago with Nikki, we drove from OH to TX with her in the back seat or on our lap. Each time worked out.
 

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I do have a sturdy laundry basket that would fit her perfectly, in terms of size, and I could put it on the floor on the passenger side. But would that be safe enough? I'll be picking her up on my own and we have a ride of 3 1/2 hrs.

I'm also going to experiment with squeezing the big airline crate into the backseat. If that fits, I'll go that route. Whatever is safest and makes her feel the most comfortable on the ride home.
 

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We used a crate both times. I am glad I did because both of my girls got car sick and threw up. Bring lots of paper towels and plastic bags for quick clean up just in case. Plus a few clean towels or small blankets for a quick change. One of them cried on and off during the ride but when I would put my hand down in the crate she would settle down. Hopefully you will luck out and the puppy will happily nap all the way home
 

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You should ask your breeder if they will even let you take the puppy home NOT in a crate. A lot of breeders insist for safety reasons that the puppy be in a crate when you put him/her in the car and drive off. We, too, used a cat carrier and it was plenty large enough for the puppy to sleep in the whole way home (which ended up being a 5 hour drive when we got stuck in traffic!).
 

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We brought a crate to get Lucy...

It was about a four hour car ride. However about 20 mins into the ride home the kids couldn't stand it & took her out for the rest of the way. However it was really nice to have when we stopped for snacks or bathroom breaks.

Have fun!!

Lynne
 

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My puppies first crates are always cat carriers (they even use them for night sleeping for the first few weeks). Unless your pup is huge, I'm sure it will be plenty comfortable in the cat crate.
 

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Clare--Watney's mom
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If you are by yourself, I would recommend a cat crate if you have access to one. We used a laundry basket for our second dog, (spontaneous decision-had to improvise), and she kept trying to climb out-she was 8 weeks. My daughter was in the back seat with her so she was able to monitor her, but unless you have something secure to place on top, not such a good idea.
 

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The problem is I don't have a crate that's small enough to fit in the backseat or even in the trunk (we have a hatchback). We got a big one with a divider to last us when she grows up. I do have a regular cat carrier but I don't want to lock the poor baby in that tiny thing and have that be her first experience with a crate. What would you suggest I do?
My pup came home at 9 weeks in a cat carrier. It was the perfect size. What you want is enough space for your dog to walkin, turn around, and lie down. The less room around the pup, the less he/she will be bounced around. A cat carrier is a good, safe option. Add a towel for some comfort - and something easy to clean if there's an accident.
 

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Rainheart Glad to hear you had no problems. But I hope you would agree that sleeping on the seat makes you ill prepared to handle them. if you get in a wreck, you will not even know where you will go let alone your new found bundle of joy. if he gets car sick, you are ill prepared to contain the mess. And the same goes if he has problems pooping and peeing on the ride home. I know our guy did quite well in the nine hour drive home but even he had a problem along the way that would have been much more difficult to deal with had he not been contained in a crate. Again, i am glad you and your puppy made it without problems. And it can happen. But those experiences compared to the horror stories do not really make a sound basis for not providing a crate for the puppy.
 

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Definitely use a crate. Preferably the one that they will be using for a bit. Metal is probably best. Plastic or cloth could be chewed on by puppy teeth. Also you might want to give him a teaspoon of honey before he gets into the car. It settles their stomachs.
 
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