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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi forum,

I am new and in the process of buying a puppy. After making the deposit, I asked for the contract and notice that it excludes giardia in the health guarantee. Is that standard? Or should it raise a red flag for me? I read some horror stories about giardia in dogs online and I have two small children. Thanks in advance.
 

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I personally think you should have had the chance to review the contract before making a deposit in it is non-refundable.

To answer your question, I think it is common for contracts that come with a health gaurentee to cover specific genetic and/or congenital defects. Thinks like hip, elbow, eye or heart problems.

Most contracts I have seen give the purchaser the right to have the puppy's health checked by a vet of their choosing and at their expense with in a certain period of time usually around 72 hours from taking custody of the pup. If at that time a health issue is discovered you have the right to return the pup for a full refund of the purchase price.

I have never seen a health gaurentee for infectious or parasitic issues passed that first few days as breeders do not have control over what a buyer is exposing a puppy to.

If you are concerned about health, make sure you are insisting on complete and verifiable health certifications on mom and dad, request the vet check record for your puppy (they should have had at least one vet visit before going home, the health check) and go see the condition of where all the dogs are kept and how the puppies look. Expect to see bright eyes, good energy levels and clean noses. If you see dull or crusty eyes, lethargic puppies and snotty or crusty noses, I would be hesitant.
 

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Grumpy Old Man
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should breeder contract exclude giardia?
The short answer is yes.

The breeder has no control over the wide range of flora and fauna (including Giardia) the pup will be exposed to once it leaves their care.
 

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the party's crashing us
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Of course. Giardia is a parasite a dog can get at any point in its life. No way could the breeder guarantee against it or be responsible for it.
 

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pleguin, welcome to the forum.

I merged your threads together so you would have all the info/replies in the same thread.

Enjoy the forum.
 

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Agree - it should be excluded. Even if the puppy contracts giardia before it goes home, it's not necessarily the breeder's fault. The pup could easily drink from a puddle in the backyard or pick up a rock or stick that a racoon or skunk pooped on and contract it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks all. Is it your understanding that giardia is treatable, then? Some of the stories online indicate that there are puppies that are never able to kick it, and human household members who get it from the puppy. It seems like a big risk to take. And it doesn't seem so hard to know where the pup got it if you test the day after you get it? Incubation is at least a day on giardia shedding in stool. But if it's standard for breeders to exclude it then it seems I may have no choice but to take this risk?
 

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Esquire Golden Retrievers
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If a puppy comes home with giardia, that's a sign of a possible bad breeder. But your puppy could contract giardia the day you bring it home, and the risk continues for the rest of its life (though it's mostly puppies who contract it). So, what "risk" are you talking about? It is impossible to guarantee that a puppy will never get giardia, unless he never goes outside and neither do you. We all, puppies and humans alike, risk contracting bacterial infections of all kinds every time we step into the real world. If you're afraid of giardia, perhaps you should not get a puppy. Puppies get giardia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm confused how coming home with giardia is a sign of a possible bad breeder, if giardia is everywhere and can be picked up so easily?
 

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Because it is so very easy to acquire, many breeders treat for it prophylactically as puppy is going home starting 3 days before leaving and sending meds home w new owner to continue the course with.
If you are super worried about it, you could always supply the breeder with meds just in case for your puppy to start on at her house or ask her if she usually medicates her litters just in case. I'm assuming you have a situation that's got you sensitized around giardia- is someone at your home on chemo maybe? Good handwashing should protect your family in most cases.
 

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The other thing is, it is about 50% on catching it on a fecal. So puppy could still have it, and the vet not see it. That's why many breeders just go on and treat, it IS everywhere. Lots of breeders treat for coccidian too, whether it is dx'd or not. Stress brings symptoms in puppies who could carry a disease like this manageably, and going to new home is stressor so it is reasonable to treat them just in case.
I think that she meant a litter all sick with any parasitic thing is a sign of a bad breeder. Runny noses, runny poops, listless behavior... anything that is indicative of less than thriving conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes, my 2.5 year old son is immune compromised and we need to be careful with things that humans can acquire from pets. Also concerned by the many stories online about pups who can't seem to recover from giardia. That would be so sad for our family!
 

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The majority of adult dogs that are exposed to any sort of natural landscape (ie fields, streams, woods) are going to have giardia and/or coccidia living in their gut. They are able to withstand them and not have any symptoms. It is only in puppies that they are likely to cause symptoms since their immune systems are not fully developed. Treating a pup or an adult dog will only work on the the organisms that are in them at that moment. Since these are present in untreated water and dirt you can see how easily the pup can reinfect themselves. They can also pick them up from adult dogs who are infected but asymptomatic (butt sniffing). Turn time on symptoms presenting themselves can be within 24 hours of infection for a young puppy. On the positive side, most pups quickly overcome these disorders and what is I see as complaints of dogs that cannot kick them is really reinfection.

If you keep the dog yard clean and do not allow your son near any puppy poo, it would be unlikely he could come in contact with either giardia or coccidia.
 
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I would not be fearful of this. Of all the dogs I personally know or have had, any dogs that were treated, were treated successfully. Your son probably has more of a chance of picking it up from playing in the playground than if it were in your own house, because you would be cleaning any area that the puppy might poop on and you wouldn't be having your child play in the same area your dog is pooping.

When we brought my first golden home, my breeder sent the medication home with her puppies as a preventative measure since stress will bring it out. Cannot remember what the pills were.

Also remember when you do research on this forum that it is going to seem that certain problems are common, when they really are not, because people are looking for answers and find this forum in their time of need.

Edit: I have never heard of anybody actually catching this from their dog.
 

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cubbysan nailed it. Don't be apprehensive with getting a pup. Just be diligent with the pup and your son.
You'll be just fine.
 

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Have you asked the breeder if they send home puppies on meds? Do you have a veterinarian already? If so, just ask them to help you w the meds coming home if your breeder isn't treating. If you don't already, ask your pediatrician to call someone for you to get dosage and call you in some metronidiazole. But certainly don't keep the puppy on anything for more than the 7-10 days of initial treatment and don't assume he has it downline if he has loose stools... there are a bazillion more likely reasons in a puppy for loose stools and I'd pretty much assume that last (assuming he ate something he shouldn't, or his food isn't suiting him, or he's teething first) in a well-adjusted happy puppy in a clean home. The odds are super slim I would think if you are a normally cleaning momma and everyone hand washes and you don't let your son play in a poopy area. Pick up poop, keep the yard clean...at last you will have use of all those plastic grocery bags! Keep your puppy clean and healthy and happy and he'll be fine.
 
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