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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Emma is one now and I swear within a week of her birthday she has gone mad!! Chewing wall, just testing us all the time. We take her swimming almost every night as it is so HOT in Texas. After much throwing of stick she still comes home and is all wound up. She demands a lot of attention. I am with her everyday and give her lots of love. Anyone else had this problem at 1 year old? Appreciate any feedback.
 

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Have you considered structured activities, such as agility, flyball, competitive obedience? Training is fantastic because it uses their brain and I believe that gets them just as tired as physical activity.
Or is there a quality doggy day camp near you? Playing with doggies in a secure environment will surely tire her out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Liliam. I do take her to a "doggy day care" occasionally. Probably not often enough. We will have to check into some kind of structured training.
 

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If she's ball crazy and her hips are good you may want to try Flyball. I'm actually thinking about that for Max as soon as he gets his hips evaluated.
 

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Animalover

Animalover

She sounds completely normal to me!!
Do you have a fenced yard where you can throw a ball around for her or chase her in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't have a fenced yard. I know we don't have the ideal lifestyle for her. But we take care of her as if she is our child (which she is). She has not had her hips evaluated. She's been to her Vet numerous times (shots, UTI, etc). They have never mentioned that. She kind of dives off a big rock to swim after the stick or ball. I pray I haven't hurt her hips in some way...never thought of it like that. I need to take her to Doggie Daycare more often so she can play with other dogs. She loves dogs, kids, anyone in a wheelchair or driving a "scooter". I took her on a golf cart and she loves it!!!! It just seems like all of a sudden she started being a stinker!!!
 

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Any sudden change in behavior should have you evaluating your schedule (what things have changed? Schedule? Types of exercise? Stressors in the home? Temperature? weather/storms?) and a vet visit.

Around 9-14 months, many owners feel like their dogs are very good and have (intentionally or not) started letting up on the training and structure....so we see a return of naughty behaviors and new ones too. If your dog is getting into trouble, up the management as well as training. We use management (crates, gates, tethering, preventing access, keeping busy with other things, etc) until more training is in place and you can trust your dog to make the right decision.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, actually we are all (me, husband and her) going through a big life change. Emma is used to having us both with her 24/7. Now my husband is working outside of the home. Also, she isn't used to this Texas HOT weather. So except for the swimming most evenings she isn't outdoors in the day time very much. I will take your suggestion(s) RedDog. What is the procedure for a hip test?
 

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Read the Piper Chronicals.........and then as someone said, say a prayer of thanksgiving......
Finally at 3 years and 5th heat she has really calmed down, almost a bit too much.
I miss the roudyness but now Paco seems to be the primary master of mischief.
 

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Cosmo is pretty insane too and we DO a lot of training and structured activity, so don't feel bad. Just have a look at the April 2010 puppies thread. I swear anyone who goes in there would never get a golden, haha!
 

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9-18 months is when dogs have the greatest chance of ending up in the shelter due to behavior. Adolescence can be a rowdy time for many dogs.

Training and management can go a long way toward surviving this phase. Training not only helps build behaviors you LIKE, it's also a WONDERFUL mental workout to help tire out your pup... AND it can be done indoors in the air conditioning! You can train practical behaviors (long duration stays) and fun behaviors (tricks: spin, shake, roll, weave between your legs).
 

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Yeah that was my first thought..... lol.... Welcome to adolescence
better you than me
been there done that
have fun
I agree with the others about some formal training/exercise
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Only having experience with our bridge girl Hannah (one year ago 5/31, crying...) who was so docile. When she got into trouble she listened/learned right away. Emma will bite or mouth right after we correct her. She always has to have the last "say". Very demanding: lots of whining for attention, or pawing our arms to keep petting her. She is a very loving girl. And we would never give her up...She is a handful. I suppose right now she is more in charge than we are. I think we are pitiful at managing her. I have her sitting, stay (not for very long) shake. Not very good at "come". I want to be a responsible parent who keeps her mind occupied and happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi Jackie. Emma is now 14 months and has settled a bit. We take her swimming every night and that seems to help. It's so HOT here you can't exercise her during the day. She's a sweetie even when she's bad. LOL
 

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From 11 to 13 months Cooper was wild! I mean wild! He disobeyed on purpose, he lost his good recall, he got into all the mischief he could, especially around females!
And then, all of a sudden, he turned into a total sweetheart. Obedient, cuddly, loving! It was kind of an overnight change :) So hang in there, adolescence ends eventually!
 
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