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I am sort of puzzled, but I’m thinking it’s my own fault. I didn’t realize there were so many differences possible in the Golden Retriever breed when they have AKC registered parents. Anyway, my puppy is only four months old (born October 2, 2019 and this pic was taken February 2, 2020). She weighs 40 pounds and can easily eat eight or more cups of food per day. I swear, every morning when she emerges from her crate she has GROWN. The vet said I can expect her to weigh NINETY POUNDS. What??? Everything I’ve read said under sixty for a female! Why have I ended up with a Shetland pony???
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The bag of food will tell how much to feed dogs on average free about 10-15% LESS then the bag said. The bag recommendations are a daily portion so you divide the amount shown by the number meals and that's what your free pretty meal. At 4.5 months or after your can take the same amount and divide the same amount by 2.

A puppy will eat 8 cups but you don't feed that much, that's crazy.
 

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Welcome to the forum! As you are learning, yes, being AKC registered only means that the breeder provided some sort of proof to the AKC that both the sire and the dam were Golden Retrievers.... It does absolutely nothing to ensure that your puppy (or her parents) might meet the "breed standard," and irresponsible breeders will neither know or care what the breed standard is... they're just making puppies... That's not to say that responsible breeders don't sometimes produce pups that grow either smaller or larger than the breed standard (genetics can be funny that way), but they WILL be making their breeding decisions with the intent of producing puppies that meet that standard (which, by the way, is a height of 21.5"-22.5" at the shoulders and an average weight of 55-65lbs for females).

That said... your dog is lovely, and if the worst you can say when she's full grown is that she is MUCH larger than you had hoped, you will want to count your blessings (there are much worse things that can come from buying a puppy from a potentially irresponsible breeder). She doesn't look overweight in your picture, but you do want to try to err on the side of keeping her lean. Not only is it healthier for her but it may slow her growth a bit. You may also want to read up on delaying having her spayed until her growth plates are closed (spaying prior to that point may result in delayed closure and a taller dog). Be aware that will mean getting through one or two heats before you spay her (which is a hassle and will mean you will have to be very diligent to keep her away from intact male dogs).

Otherwise, just love the dog you have... you may yet find she has blessings you have not yet discovered!
 

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I am sort of puzzled, but I’m thinking it’s my own fault. I didn’t realize there were so many differences possible in the Golden Retriever breed when they have AKC registered parents. Anyway, my puppy is only four months old (born October 2, 2019 and this pic was taken February 2, 2020). She weighs 40 pounds and can easily eat eight or more cups of food per day. I swear, every morning when she emerges from her crate she has GROWN. The vet said I can expect her to weigh NINETY POUNDS. What??? Everything I’ve read said under sixty for a female! Why have I ended up with a Shetland pony??? View attachment 869820
Our Max was 54 pounds at four months. He was 30 pounds at 11 weeks, when we brought him home. Golden Retrievers come in all sizes. Max is now 9.5 years old and has been at about 135 pounds for most of his adult life. He is near 28 inches at the shoulder and quite long. He is also a certified therapy dog and has been a wonderful companion. Enjoy your big girl.
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my boy just turned 4 months and he is about 38lbs at the moment, still looking quite lean. he gets 4 cups a day + 400g of raw. 8 cups sounds like alot!
 

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Fletch was 40 at 4 months and he is just under 70 now at 10.5 months. His parents are 70/75 and vet thinks he will be between 75/80. We thought he was going to be HUGE but growth has really slowed the last few months! In the beginning I referred to him as Digby the World’s Largest Dog haha! (Old movie)
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Wow, some big goldens out there! My girl is 7 months old and 39.9 pounds. Her parents are within standard, though probably toward the smaller/lighter end of it. She’s growing and gaining weight slowly now and eats about 2&1/2 cups of food daily. I think she will hit about 50-55 pounds when full grown.
 

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I did not know that being a big size golden was a deficit unless the owner has some physical problems in handlng big size dog.
In Summary;
The main question is whether you have a spacious heart for her or not.
If not, there is a wish list in most of the households for double dose of cuteness. Just let us and let her know the earliest possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
To Pawsnpaca:

Thank you! I appreciate your kind response. I was planning on waiting on the spay. And I’m cutting back on her food. I didn’t realize that the amount of food could impact her growth.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
To Peri29

Oh no, my girl is staying here! But yes, it will be a bit harder on us to handle a ninety or hundred pound dog. We are both in our sixties with skeletal problems. But I was just looking for some feedback. I have lots of heart room for Annabelle!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wow, some big goldens out there! My girl is 7 months old and 39.9 pounds. Her parents are within standard, though probably toward the smaller/lighter end of it. She’s growing and gaining weight slowly now and eats about 2&1/2 cups of food daily. I think she will hit about 50-55 pounds when full grown.
Well, since I have obviously overfed her, I am backing that down. Maybe her growth will slowdown as I decrease her food.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Fletch was 40 at 4 months and he is just under 70 now at 10.5 months. His parents are 70/75 and vet thinks he will be between 75/80. We thought he was going to be HUGE but growth has really slowed the last few months! In the beginning I referred to him as Digby the World’s Largest Dog haha! (Old movie) View attachment 869847 View attachment 869848
Oh, this is so encouraging! Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Our Max was 54 pounds at four months. He was 30 pounds at 11 weeks, when we brought him home. Golden Retrievers come in all sizes. Max is now 9.5 years old and has been at about 135 pounds for most of his adult life. He is near 28 inches at the shoulder and quite long. He is also a certified therapy dog and has been a wonderful companion. Enjoy your big girl.
Thank you! We will!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The bag of food will tell how much to feed dogs on average free about 10-15% LESS then the bag said. The bag recommendations are a daily portion so you divide the amount shown by the number meals and that's what your free pretty meal. At 4.5 months or after your can take the same amount and divide the same amount by 2.

A puppy will eat 8 cups but you don't feed that much, that's crazy.
Understood. I think “crazy” is a bit harsh, but I understand the sentiment. We are cutting back.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Puppies will grow faster if you feed them more :) But genetics play a huge role! How big are her parents?
On the bigger side, I guess. I didn’t do enough research, but it doesn’t matter. I’m not a Breeder, she is just a member of the family. I was just wondering what to expect. :)
 

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There is a breed standard and even breeders that try to breed to it can end up with faults that would not make a pup a good breeding prospect. But those pups, too big, too small, or most other faults have nothing to do with being a great pet. Even breed Champions aren’t perfect. Most pups end up being pets and goldens no matter the size are great pets and companions. They can still do most anything the perfect ones do. Only exception being show in confirmation and probably shouldn’t be bred. But if you look around there are all sizes and shapes of goldens doing all kinds of things, field work, obedience, trick dog, therapy dog, service dog, hiking and walking buddies... Love the dog you have, he or she is probably the perfect dog for you. That’s pretty much the way it has worked out for our family.
 
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