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Yes, we followed our breeder, Buckeye Golden Retrievers, for a year before going with them. All the posts on their fb page seemed rosy and glowing with praise, but Im pretty upset with how everything happened with them as a new dog owner. They didnt share with us that he was the runt of the litter, it was a surprise when we arrived. We asked for piccs and info about him, and it appears thwy sent us pics of another puppy. No info on his temperament. They barely spoke to us on pick up. Just a hand off with money exchange. It felt pretty dubious, not at all like their online presence.
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I'm sorry you are going through this with your puppy. I just looked up Buckeye Golden Retrievers and this does not look like an ethical breeder breeding well bred dogs. Looks like a glorified BYB...breeding pet line Goldens. There are no registered names, no mention of health certs, no show or working titles...and they also breed Creams. Prices are too cheap...also. Honestly....I would take him back to the breeder (they will most likely re-sell)...and read the forums to learn how to find a good breeder. A breeder that does something with their dogs to prove temperament, and does health certs on the dogs they use for breeding. It will save you years of heartbreak.
 

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Your threadbare me think of this very sad thread.
It is very risky if your pup is truly aggressive and you hope to have children.
 

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I think it is really helpful if the breeder will do a few things before the pups go home. 1. Practice giving pup small treats so he associates hands with good things. 2. Pet and praise puppy while he is eating, so he is used to being touched. . Take the bowel a few inches away from pup, then give it right back and praise him. 3. Talk to pup all the time while you are doing this so he is not startled. These steps may require feeding the pups individually. I think this is part of the socialization that should start before pup goes home.


Yes, we followed our breeder, Buckeye Golden Retrievers, for a year before going with them. All the posts on their fb page seemed rosy and glowing with praise, but Im pretty upset with how everything happened with them as a new dog owner. They didnt share with us that he was the runt of the litter, it was a surprise when we arrived. We asked for piccs and info about him, and it appears thwy sent us pics of another puppy. No info on his temperament. They barely spoke to us on pick up. Just a hand off with money exchange. It felt pretty dubious, not at all like their online presence.
I looked at buckeye goldens for bit, but they gave me a bad feeling. Would you be able to sign him up for a board and train program after he has the necessary shots? Being with a trainer all day every day for a period of time might be beneficial in stopping that aggression and preventing any future problems, as they work with rehabilitation and such for a living. It isn’t a guarantee but it might help a bit!
 

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"Is it possible the vet and behavioralist are over stating the case? "

It sounds like you have found very knowledgeable, experienced, vet and behaviorist. I would take what they say extremely seriously. Reading through your comments, my answer to your question is NO, they are not over stating the case. Putting a 15 week old puppy on Prozac for aggression is a seriously huge red flag. What you are experiencing is not in anyway normal for Golden Retriever puppies. Since you do know that the sire has aggression issues, you need to consider that this is "hard wired" and can't be corrected. Give some thought to whether you can, should, or want to deal with this aggression for 10-12 YEARS.

I am really sorry you are dealing with this, and I sincerely hope you find a real solution. You do have a good team to help you work with him,
 

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I am so sorry you must deal with this. I'm also sorry you didn't work with a better breeder, that breeds for temperament and does testing at 6 weeks and spends weeks training the pups before they go home. Finding this puppy a home with an experienced owner will be much easier when the pup is still young so if this is a consideration make this decision soon. Maybe this breeder has another puppy from different parents?

I agree if this is a pre wired aggression (genetic) and already on medication before 4 months this is certainly something that can be managed but will never be a dog you can take out places, nor should it be allowed around visitors to your home so life with this dog is not going to be ideal for you or the pup.

This behavior can be managed but for a 1st time dog owner I think you are in over your head JMO. Please remember this dog is going to be around 70 lbs! That's a whole lot of dog to deal with. Just taking the dog for a walk may require a muzzle. Please be sure you want to make this commitment, tough experience for a 1st pup.
 

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Hey, first of all I didn’t read all of the comments. But I see a lot of them are very negative. I feel like you should keep your head up, your puppy is still young and can change. Agression is in most of the cases not actually agression. It’s fear. Your puppy is just 15 wks old and isn’t capable of real agression. And I don’t mean that I don’t believe your experience..it’s just that MAYBE the interpretion of it is wrong.. just trying to give you some courage to keep working on it. It sure can be a genetic thing, but you can’t say that right now when he is still a puppy.
With the food guarding: don’t ever mess with his food. There are people who say you should mess with it and reward for staying calm, but this is contraproductive. It won’t solve food guarding, it makes it worse. The only thing you can do is give him more food while eating. So he makes the connection that if your hands are close it’s something positive. But don’t ever take it away. If this still doesn’t work just keep it to management. Make sure he can’t hurt anybody and make sure nobody comes close to him while eating.
For agression outside I would say it’s based on fear. Don’t treat it like agression, treat it like fear. Do everything in realllyyyyy slow steps. Keep distance from things he is afraid of (=things he acts agressive to). Is he shows stress signals you didn’t keep your distance enough. Also let him sniff around a lot, it calms dogs down.
Puppy’s are naturally more fearful. Don’t cross his bounderies. Too much is too much. I wouldn’t say this agressive outbursts are normal but I feel like you should keep trying. Maybe it gets better :)
 

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Btw, I wanted to add that a lot of puppy’s growl and bark at some point to their owners. It’s just a growing up thing, checking out bounderies. Some people think it’s agression but it’s not. Just wanted to say this just in case you didn’t know. (But I think you will know the difference?)
 

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They have great vets at OSU. I have a resource guarder. It's not an easy task caring for them. Mine is a small mix breed. After years of work, I can now pick up her dish while she's eating. Why? To add something even better, of course! If I mess with the dog food, it's going to always come back with a piece of chicken or a hot dog, maybe a favorite treat on top. It's a long process with aggression but it can be successful. She is 10 now, I never allow children around her food dish while she's eating. It's a lifelong ban.

The hand feeding idea is a great place to start.
 

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Puddles
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Btw, I wanted to add that a lot of puppy’s growl and bark at some point to their owners. It’s just a growing up thing, checking out bounderies. Some people think it’s agression but it’s not. Just wanted to say this just in case you didn’t know. (But I think you will know the difference?)
I appreciate you are wanting to be supportive, we are all supportive if she decides to keep this pup. To her credit she has reached out to qualified people, vet/behaviorist, vet techs so it's more serious than simple puppy behavior... this dog is on Prozac and is not yet 4 months old.
How many aggressive dogs have you raised or lived with? The people posting are attempting to educate what life will be in the future for her and this dog have done this before. We don't mean to sound like doom and gloom but the people that have posted have done this, probably more than once. You can't fight mother nature, only contain it.
This is a beginner owner with the hopes of having children in her future. Aggression at this level will not be limited to just dinner time if this is truly genetics... if they happen to walk past a bone in the yard... say pick it up to mow, would you want a 70 lb dog charging at you? This is a possibility this person needs to consider when making a decision.
Everyone here will offer as much advice on how to take precautions to keep everyone safe. Everyone wants the best for this family and the puppy but truly aggressive dogs seldom mellow. It's a lifetime of medication and precautions.
 

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I appreciate you are wanting to be supportive, we are all supportive if she decides to keep this pup. To her credit she has reached out to qualified people, vet/behaviorist, vet techs so it's more serious than simple puppy behavior... this dog is on Prozac and is not yet 4 months old.
How many aggressive dogs have you raised or lived with? The people posting are attempting to educate what life will be in the future for her and this dog have done this before. We don't mean to sound like doom and gloom but the people that have posted have done this, probably more than once. You can't fight mother nature, only contain it.
This is a beginner owner with the hopes of having children in her future. Aggression at this level will not be limited to just dinner time if this is truly genetics... if they happen to walk past a bone in the yard... say pick it up to mow, would you want a 70 lb dog charging at you? This is a possibility this person needs to consider when making a decision.
Everyone here will offer as much advice on how to take precautions to keep everyone safe. Everyone wants the best for this family and the puppy but truly aggressive dogs seldom mellow. It's a lifetime of medication and precautions.
Hey, I don’t think it’s just puppy behavior. But I wanted to mention it just in case, because some people really don’t know the difference between real agression and puppy behaviour. I have seen so many posts that went something like “my puppy is agressive, she bites me!,” (well duh it’s a puppy). If you know what I mean. I really think it is a real problem in this case, but it couldn’t hurt to mention another possibility. My actual advice was in the post above.

That a vet is giving a puppy prozac seems a bit heavy. After how much training did he give those? (Can’t be long because the puppy is just 15 wks old). No judgement to the owner though, but vets are fast with describing medication. Was it a balanced trainer or positive?
I’ve never seen a truly agressive puppy in my life. What I have seen is people who call something agression when the dog is in fact just really fearful. The people who aren’t home in dog theory don’t always understand the difference.
I’m just throwing a different perspective of things. Why are we so sure it is a hopeless genetic thing in a 3,5 month old? IF that is the case, than you can’t change anything about it, and just have to deal with it. BUT nobody can be sure yet, so the only option left is trying. And with that my advice stays the same: treat it like fear, keep distance to things he can’t handle yet. And don’t mess with food. Hands should only be giving good things.
If they want to rehome the dog, it’s a choice they have to make themselves.
 
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