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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. Boomer is turning 12 this week!
I noticed he's been drooling more and more and now has drool lines formed down his chin under his canine teeth on either side.
I noticed he's getting a mildewy smell around the area.

I already brush his teeth every night. Does anyone else have experience w/ this? I was wondering should I start washing his mouth and chin with a wascloth? Use anything?

If no one knows I'll ask the vets. Thank you!
 

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I'd say to definitely get him checked out by a vet. We noticed that our Di was drooling during hydrotherapy. The hydrotherapist recommeded we get her checked. Not to scare you, but she had hemangiosarcoma. Not sure if they were definitely related, but she had never done this before and the vet seemed to think that it was a symptom.
 

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I, too, would have it checked by a vet. It could be nothing at all, on up to something very serious.
If the vet feels it's nothing serious, ask about getting some "malacetic" I think it's called. It comes in nice wipes that you can wipe the area with a couple times a day. Here's a link that shows it (I'm not recommending you buy it from these people, just showing you what I'm talking about)
MalAcetic for Dogs & Cats Topical Skin Care
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the suggestions, you guys are the best!
Will look for MalAcetic and check w/ vet.
 

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I wonder if there is something going on in the mouth that may cause it too--perhaps something with a tooth or with a salivary gland. Let us know what you find out.
 

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I'd have it checked out too... only because there can be various things going on. I do not think it's an emergancy though. Maybe bring it up when you next go to the vet within the next couple months? Unless there are other symptoms.

If he's over all healthy, doesn't have nastier breath (intestinal problem related bad breath) than normal (morning breath), and doesn't have the old age "droop" going on, it might be a dental issue...

We had a similar thing with our Danny in his last year (he was 12). That I can remember it was mainly because his face was getting loose and also he was sleeping much deeper than ever. He also had eye tearing issues because he had old age ectropion, again because of his face getting really loose. <= When he was younger his face was properly tight from flews to eyes. So the drooling and teary eyes were big concerns when I first noticed them.

If nothing is wrong other than the droops, you do have to wipe the mouth, otherwise the bacteria collects and can cause skin issues. Or well. That SMELL. :)
 

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I think you should have his mouth/teeth checked to make sure nothing is wrong in there. If all checks out well, I think you do need to keep that area as clean and dry as possible since constant wetness could cause skin issues.
 

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For what it's worth, there's a show on here called ER Vets - and they had a case of a dog who had jaw surgery. Afterwards, he was drooling a lot and the vets were putting an ointment on him to help dry the area and prevent an infection from all the moistness. Might be something your vet can give you to help prevent any bacteria from growing.

Hope he's better soon.
 
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Boomer

Praying that Boomer is alright!!
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the suggestions and concerns; you guys are the best :)

Actually, Boomer does have a broken bottom canine tooth. The tip broke off many years ago when he was home with my ex-bf (who didn't know anything about it). I raced him to the vet who said there was nothing to do about it and it wasn't bothering him.

Gradually over the years it has worn down, about half gone now, but the nerve must have died, because he still eats and chews his toys and bones.

I noticed that smell less the last couple of days. I was making Boomer wear his cone because he was licking his hotspot, I wonder if that was contributing to the smell, trapping that moisture around his mouth.

I will keep an eye out and of course bring him to his senior exams every 6 months and take him in if I notice anything drastically wrong.

Next stop: canine dentures!
 

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Actually, Boomer does have a broken bottom canine tooth. The tip broke off many years ago when he was home with my ex-bf (who didn't know anything about it). I raced him to the vet who said there was nothing to do about it and it wasn't bothering him.

Gradually over the years it has worn down, about half gone now, but the nerve must have died, because he still eats and chews his toys and bones.
We're actually watching a similar thing with the cat. His canine tooth is broken (about 30% is missing and there appears to be a crack running down to the gumline).

Our vet advised to leave it alone for now, but one of the things she suggested watching for (as a sign of pain/infection) was drooling. I don't know why I forgot that (or didn't transfer it from cat to dog in my mind) before now.

She said that animals are really good to ignore pain and there's really no way to tell how much pain the animal may be in. She gave an example of a chihuahua that had a broken tooth (broken off at the gumline) and when they referred it to have it removed, the surgeon realized that 3 of the surrounding teeth had abscessed. The dog had been eating and drinking normally up to the night before surgery.
 

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Next Senior checkup, ask your Vet about a new product they might be carrying.

It is GREENIES® Veterinary Formula Canine Dental Chews and are our first treats that can help protect dogs from oral health issues as well as general health issues.

Like all other Greenies, my dogs love them. I am not sure if they have the Vet Formula in the cat Greenies yet but you can ask the Vet about that too or check on greenies.com? Let me know if you decide to go with them. I am anxious to hear results.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks desi, that was good timing, Boomer just had his senior exam last week. The vet didn't have anything like that, but I doubt they would approve of anything like that for him b/c he's allergic to everything. They condone him only having natural products w/ pure proteins such as venison, duck, fish, and potato based starch products. $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
He hasn't been having that problem anyway. He still drools but it doesn't smell so bad. It must have been the cone. He still have to wear the cone but he busted the old one to smithereens and the new one seems to be more open and airy.
He's doing ok for an old guy :--heart:
 
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Next Senior checkup, ask your Vet about a new product they might be carrying.

It is GREENIES® Veterinary Formula Canine Dental Chews and are our first treats that can help protect dogs from oral health issues as well as general health issues.

Like all other Greenies, my dogs love them. I am not sure if they have the Vet Formula in the cat Greenies yet but you can ask the Vet about that too or check on greenies.com? Let me know if you decide to go with them. I am anxious to hear results.
Is this a different formulation from the Greenies that killed so many dogs a few years ago?
 

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$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Awwww. I know what you mean. I just switched my biggest eater to the Natural Choice Grain Free Fish and Potato. She is really having coat issues since she got injured. The Vet said the stress of an injury often causes problems. I'm sure this will help Maggie but I wish that Goldie, who eats like a bird, was the one I had to switch.
 

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The Greenies Veterinary Formula are very recently developed and are new.

The original Greenies canine dental chews were reformulated in 2006 to be highly soluble and safe, yet effective as a daily preventive of oral disease. Independent studies conducted in 2007 by the University of Illinois confirm the high solubility of Greenies dental chews. The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) Seal of Acceptance affirms the products’ efficacy to help control plaque and tartar.

Like I mentioned before, my dogs love them. Around here, the dogs really like the "treat" in treatment.
 
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