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Riley hasn't yet understood the command "come", usually we keep him chained up while outside because we don't have a fenced in yard and he'll run wild if he gets off the chain. What can I do to speed up the command to come? I'm more afraid of him getting ran over then running away.
 

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Running away.

Unfortunately, I am probably getting ready to open up a can of worms. But here it goes. Frankly, Beau's recall stinks. Now mind you, he has his CGC and his TDI, but when he is at home, I honestly believe he thinks he doesn't have to mind. He will stop and look at me when I call, then give me this look and take off the other way. It was not like he does not understand the command but intentionally chooses to ignore it. Now to open the can. The solution was a shock collar. I know many people will totally disagree but he had a professional trainer come out and assess Beau. He was trying to uproot me as alpha. We worked on leash for a couple of weeks and did OK while the leash was on, but as soon as it was off he would refuse to come when called. I know, he will know when the shock collar is off as well, but no he won't. We have an Invisible Fence and he wears that collar all the time. One collar will just replace the other and since they are the same size, I don't believe he can tell the difference. We haven't not yet ordered a collar for him, but will do so this weekend. It has done wonders and yes I have felt the shock. Beau doesn't have to be knocked off his feet to get his attention. This collar is adjustable and the shock is pretty mild, more like a gentle reminder.

Good luck to you.

Julie
 

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Julie - you are going to receive some nastygrams for this thread. But you do whatever YOU feel is right for you and Beau. Don't let anyone get to you. If a shock collar is what it takes to take control then use it. It's much better than having Beau hit by a car.
 

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Golden Reily - I've always been taught to use lots of tiny little treats and lots of praise during any type of training. My dogs have always loved cheese so I cut up any type of cheese we have in the house whenever we need some encouragement. (which is all the time)

You could try this . . . we call it puppy ping-pong. Have your puppy with you and someone else stand in the yard about 20 yds. away. Both of you should be well armed with treats. The person away from the dog should call to it in an excited voice and try to entice it to come to him. As soon as the dog even starts to make a move toward the caller heap on the praise and when the dog gets there offer a treat. Repeat this in the other direction as soon as the treat is consumed, which is usually one nano-second. Keep this up for five minutes or so. Then offer the dog a short break time by playing with him and sweet-talking. Repeat twice and take a few steps apart with each session.

You have to do this every day for at least a week for the idea to "set" in your dog's mind. I know, every day seems like a lot but it's much, much better than a dead dog.

I apologize for getting long winded but the recall is a very important command that every dog must learn. One thing that is very interesting about the K9 is that they train very well. That is, they will repeat things that they have been rewarded for long after the rewards are no longer offered. In most cases for life. Of course it is our obligation to offer lost of praise EVERYTIME they do something good. So I guess that's reward enough sometimes. This is exactly why our ancestors took so much of their time to train the wolves to hunt, to herd, and to do many tasks within the tribe.
 

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lvngold said:
The solution was a shock collar. ..... This collar is adjustable and the shock is pretty mild, more like a gentle reminder.
I've had the chance to meet two people in my neighbourhood who uses e-collars to train their dogs. One is a golden and the other a lab. I've had a chance to "touch" the device. I must say, the e-collars have a reputation they do not deserve. The vibes delivered by the collar is not much stronger than your vibrating massage tool. Its not a nasty electrical shock that many believe it to be.

Back to the original question. Riley probably runs wild the moment he's off leash because its something rare and fun for him. Bring him somewhere where he can run off leash safely. Reduce the novelty of being "off-leash". Play puppy ping-pong, always have a yummy treat, etc. I found that this had strengthened Davidson's recall when he is off-leash. The more I let him play off-leash, the easier to recall him.
 

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ecollars are fine, but you must be trained in their use. You just dont strap one on and go to pushing buttons..
I would advise a long long ski rope on the dog and let him drag it around while outside.. you then have a handle to grab and they dont seem to quite figure that out..
first you have to be sure they know what it means.. you teach, and repeat... then you put the responsibility to mind on him.. grab the rope, call, and if no immediate response go to hauling pup in with very unpleasnt verbals.
you are teaching a behavior modification, so for a while, do NOT call unless in position to enforce.. you have to do it long and often enough to effect a conditioned response.. patience.. there may be nothing harder to teach some dogs that to come when called while he is distracted.
A collar will work, but I would suggest help in learning to use it. What will you do if you call and when he doesnt come you push the button and he takes off in the other direction?
He has to learn how to escape the pressure (coming to you).
 

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Training collars

Beau has had 5 sessions with a professional trainer using the e collar. The best money I have ever spent. The actual "shock" was only applied once at a very low level in his first session. The collar I purchased has a tone only feature and for the the few other times I have needed it this has been the level used.

Beau has been off leash on all of our walks and does so well. I let him roam a little but he seems to have a certain distance that he will not exceed. He will stop and turn around and wait for me to tell him it OK and to play. I have definitely had some distractions to deal with, we walk on the golf course and the other day ran into some geese. I thought, oh boy, here we go, but Beau wandered toward them but then they flew away and I used his recall and he came right back to me. He is such a joy to walk off leash now, and seems to enjoy his walks much better.
 

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Well, first he has to learn what the "Come/Here" command is. The E-collars are used for dogs that know the command, but dissobey the command. They must know the command first. The e-collar inforces a known command. It sounds like your golden has a ton of energy too burn off so more exercise and runs will help you in your training of your golden, he will be easier to work with if some of that energy can be released.:)

One thing to do is never allow him off lead untill he knows this command and is 100 percent reliable unless you can take him to safe area where off leash he cannot be harmed. I taught the "Here" command basically in a safe area off leash using treats.
 

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Run Away!!!!

Cassey has been doing the very same behaviour. The minute she is off her leash, she looks at me and runs. She started this at 41/2 months old, before that, she came when she was called. We have her on a leash or tie down all the time. I am walking her around our property line, praising when she doesn't pull towards the neighbours and scolding her when she ventures over the line. With some patience we hope she will once again be off the leash and our trust will be restored. I HOPE
 

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I am very interested to see more responses to this thread. We have the same problem with Woody--he knows the "come" command, but once he is outside off leash, he just takes off. I don't think he would run far, but he certainly won't let me catch him. And in the past I have chased him, which has just made the problem worse. I have tried treats, or running the opposite direction, but he absolutely will not come to me. Right now, my solution is just to always keep him on leash, but I am hoping to find a better way.
 

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I am totally against the e-collar. Not because I think the collar is evil, although in the wrong hands ot certainly can be, but because I clicker train and it goes totally against my training phylosophy, which is to teach the dog what to do, not punish for not doing it. But this isn't what the post is about.

Any dog can be trained the Come command in about 5 to 8 15-minute sessions. Once the dog knows the command, you add in distraction, distance, and even responding when you are out of site. The problem many people have is getting their dog to understand that all commands are to be obeyed, no questions asked. This comes from a combination of training and being consistent in every day activities. Just because you aren't in a training session, doesn't mean the dog is free to do what he wants.

A few of tips.

Don't put yourself in the situation where you give a command but can't enforce it if the dog doesn't listen.

Life by the phylosophy "Nothing in Life is Free" (NILIF) meaning treats, dinner, walks, everything the dog gets comes with a price. For a treat he must sit first. For a walk, he must sit when the leash goes on and again when it comes off. For dinner a series of commands can be done. This helps reinforce you as leader and keeps the dog in his place.

There are all sorts of training methods you can use depending on what stage your dog is at now.
 

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Get a long piece of rope and attach it to the dog's collar. Let the dog walk out to the end of the rope. Give the come command, if the dog doesn't respond immediately give a gentle tug and pull the dog to you giving the come command as you do so. When the dog is back at your side give much praise and a treat if you want. Be patient and consistent.
 

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When my past dog, a collie shepard mix, was a puppy...I had a training book....I wish I had that book, I so need it right now....but it motivated me on the absolute need for consistancy and doing the "come" exercise until it was mastered. You made the the puppy come to you by pulling on his long leash when you called his name and lavished the pup with praise when he came. Over, and over and over and.....well you know.

And never call him to you for scolding. If your dog needs a scolding...go to him.

My Beau ALWAYS came when called even when he'd rather do something else and I believe that aggressive training was the key to keeping him safe when he was young and when he was several years old. We'd walk unleashed in the park and he'd turn and run to me even if I called him while he was chasing a squirrel. Which I did occassionally to make sure I could trust him.

Now with Lucky, I haven't been so motivated or consistant and I guess I'm going to have to buy a book to re-understand the importance of training.
 

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i have the same pproblem with my 8 yr. old golden marco he bolts far away i dont want him to run away he is good but even if i let him in my fenced in backyard he hopes the 4 ft. fence i dont know what to do but my puppy just runs around the yard but she will chase a car and i dont want to get her hit by a car please tell me if you have tip i am trying to train him on a 20 ft. lead leash tell me if you think that is a good ideas
 

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I used to use baseball fields or tennis courts to work on off-leash training since i don't have a fenced-in yard. That usually gives you a large area to work off-leash, with a high surrounding fence the prohibits escaping. It takes a lot of work, praise and consistency to get it right. But in my book it's worth it since the alternative is risking your dog running away, getting hit by a car, or something similar. Take the effort now to prevent the worst.
 
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