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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Companion dog Fawn

Our sweet Sully has had a bit of an upset in the past three weeks due to us rescuing a puppy whose owner unexpectedly passed away. The puppy is young and needs lots of training which I have been doing. However, we are seeing some negative habits occurring that the dogs seem to be teaching each other. Digging has suddenly become more entertains to Sully. Up to this point he dug some but not terribly. The puppy is finding it quit entertaining also. How do I encourage them to stop digging up every tree root in our yard when they are out?

When the two play together they are very rough with one another. My fear is that their roughness with each other may overflow into how the interact with their human family… primarily my 7 yo. The puppy is not mouthy at all with us so far; but she bites at and pulls on Sully’s ears and tail, pounces on him, etc. Sully has always been mouthy and we’ve had to work with him diligently from his early puppy days until now. Since he is also still a puppy, does anyone have ideas as to how I can help encourage good behavior in both pups?

We have no idea of the breed on this puppy we rescued. But, by age/size we think she will be quite big. She was non planned in every sense so we are struggling with how to deal with the addition as well. I realize we have fully upset Sully’s world; however he seems to genuinely love playing with her and to find her a different home seems terribly wrong also given the loss of her first owner.
Any advice that you have would be great.
Thank you.
 

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It is very good of you to give this puppy a home. I do not think the rough dog play will cause them to be rough with people in fact it may help keep them from being rough with people because they can get it out of their system together. If they were mine I would let them monitor each other about what play is too rough. Dogs have a way of telling each other off if they get too rough. I would just observe and be sure no one is constantly trying to avoid the play. If they are both willingly jumping back in, it should be fine no matter how rough it looks to people. I would have your 7 year old do some training with each pup under supervision just to establish that this is not another litter mate. With the digging I would not leave them out unsupervised and bring them in whenever it starts. I usually think of digging being from boredom or making a cool spot to lay down but it sounds like maybe yours just enjoy it as a hobby. I would try and avoid the opportunity for a while and see if they stop. Putting some of their poop in a hole will usually stops them from digging there but they may just start another one if given the chance. Be sure to keep spending time training and playing with Sully with out the other puppy around and doing things with just the new puppy to keep her from becoming too dependent on Sully. Enjoy the double fun!
 

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Kristy
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Lucky pup to have landed with you all. I am afraid you've discovered why the general advice here is to wait a couple years between puppies. You can absolutely do this, but it's a huge job for a year or two.

Digging: No matter how tempting it is, I wouldn't let them out unsupervised. Try to send them out separately or go with them.

Rough play: Supervise, you will get good at hearing the escalation of growls if it gets serious or someone is getting the worst of it, try to intervene and give them a break before that happens. I don't think rough play transferring to humans is a concern as long as you are careful to make sure that you always supervise the puppy with children, don't get slack about this. Correct the puppy if you see him being too rough with a child and stop the play. Work on self control exercises with the puppy, it will help.

Training: Try to be sure each dog gets separate sessions each day. I've discovered that your older dog will backslide if you don't keep up with practice. Don't let that happen. Try to have them go on separate walks and outings with you every week as well. It's good for them and you'll also notice difference in each dog's behavior without the other present. I'm guilty of feeling bad for the 'left out' dog during training sessions - if that guilts you too, crate the other dog with a chew bone out of sight.

Wishing you luck with your new project pup. It is not easy to train another breed of dog when you've become accustomed to the cooperative spirit of a Golden, hang in there.
 

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She looks part boxer but it’s hard to say. Would you consider getting an Embark DNA test? Knowing the breed can help you a lot in deciding a training plan. If you are only used to Goldens you may be challenged trying the techniques you use for your other dog on the new puppy. Different breeds also approach the adolescent period differently.

My dogs are older and still copy each other. One decided to dig in a newly planted area. The other followed, even though my younger dog isn’t a natural digger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
“She looks part boxer but it’s hard to say. Would you consider getting an Embark DNA test? “

We have discussed possibly doing DNA testing. The humane society papers that we got from the family of the previous owner say black mouth cur/hound mix. The vet on Friday said he thinks boxer/lab mix. She is extremely smart and training much quicker than Sully ever did at this point. However, she is also more willful/stubborn. So… yes, breed certainly affects training.

We have never had a golden until Sully. He is extremely different from our usual previous breeds of beagle and a dachshund/yorkie mix. Sully is timid and it has actually taken us a bit to get used to since he gets scared of the craziest stuff. But he is sweet and we are learning why so many people love the golden breed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
“I usually think of digging being from boredom or making a cool spot to lay down but it sounds like maybe yours just enjoy it as a hobby. I would try and avoid the opportunity for a while and see if they stop. Putting some of their poop in a hole will usually stops them from digging there but they may just start another one if given the chance. “

Yes. They are far from bored. I will try to be better about supervising and the poo in the hole is an interesting idea. I’ve never heard of that. But we have plenty of poo in are yard that can be used. 😁
 
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