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Sam is 8 months and hasn't been tested for HD. His parents didn't have it, but I didn't know much about HD since we had poms growing up. Sam did shoot up in size pretty quick so its always in the back of my mind. I picked up some Glucosamine chews the other day, but just thought maybe its too early. He got neutered at 7 months and was 58lbs. But I have cut back a little on his food, and have stepped up the exercise so he doesn't seem much heavier now.
 

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the party's crashing us
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I started my last two at 12 weeks on GlycoFlex. It surely can't hurt.
 

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Barley & Mira's Mom
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This is from the OFA webpage: "Reduced caloric intake and glucosamine products in immature animals genetically predisposed for hip dysplasia may lessen the pathologic changes associated with hip dysplasia."
http://www.offa.org/faq.html#10

I figure it cannot hurt. I believe I started Mira at about 6 months.
 

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I should have been taking it myself at 6 months old :( My hip pops and locks up, my shoulder pops constantly.. my ankle too..

OH for the pups.. ;) I don't see small amount effecting the pups. There is puppy food out there that has it for large breeds. I've never read about the amount though.

Since Hayden LOOKS golden I guess I should get her on some type of suppliment too. Although she's around a year old and only 45 lbs. My husband keeps saying she looks younger than a year but she has all of her adult teeth.
 

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Personally I don't see the need to give glucosamine before middle age. I've never read anywhere that it can prevent a problem (humans or dogs). But I am aware that the symptoms can lessen in severity for those who do have problems. My Bentley started glucosamine around age 4 or 5 years and it works well for him. The amount put in some dog kibble is not in a therapeutic dosage and is mostly a marketing gimmick, IMO.
 

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Personally I don't see the need to give glucosamine before middle age. I've never read anywhere that it can prevent a problem (humans or dogs). But I am aware that the symptoms can lessen in severity for those who do have problems. My Bentley started glucosamine around age 4 or 5 years and it works well for him. The amount put in some dog kibble is not in a therapeutic dosage and is mostly a marketing gimmick, IMO.
I agree.....
 

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Nancy
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I tend to agree with MyBently & Bock. Isn't it more of a repair or build up of lost cartilage than a preventative?
 

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Not always, I read a story about a golden that got diagnosed with HD at a young age and the owner put it on glucosamine and lots of exercise and it never had to have surgery.
That would be because it was already diagnosed with HD. What Mybentley (and us) was saying was unless there is a reason for the dog to be put on glucosamine (HD or just problems in general) at any age, there really isn't a need to use it as a preventative.

Whether a dog gets HD at a young age or arthritis at 8 years old, that would be the time to use glucosamine so you would have something to help combat the pain.

On the other hand, whether the dog is young or 8 years old, if there are no problems there is no need to use the glucosamine according to what we believe.

Hope that wasn't too confusing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That would be because it was already diagnosed with HD. What Mybentley (and us) was saying was unless there is a reason for the dog to be put on glucosamine (HD or just problems in general) at any age, there really isn't a need to use it as a preventative.

Whether a dog gets HD at a young age or arthritis at 8 years old, that would be the time to use glucosamine so you would have something to help combat the pain.

On the other hand, whether the dog is young or 8 years old, if there are no problems there is no need to use the glucosamine according to what we believe.

Hope that wasn't too confusing.
Hmmmm, don't really get it but its not worth arguing! :)
 

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the party's crashing us
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That would be because it was already diagnosed with HD. What Mybentley (and us) was saying was unless there is a reason for the dog to be put on glucosamine (HD or just problems in general) at any age, there really isn't a need to use it as a preventative.

Whether a dog gets HD at a young age or arthritis at 8 years old, that would be the time to use glucosamine so you would have something to help combat the pain.

On the other hand, whether the dog is young or 8 years old, if there are no problems there is no need to use the glucosamine according to what we believe.

Hope that wasn't too confusing.
I agree exactly the opposite (obviously).
Glucosamine is purported to increase synovial joint fluid. This is the cushioning between joints. More cushioning = less likely bones grind together. Less grinding = less immune response and resulting buildup of bony material = less arthritis
Even healthy joints get arthritic over time, it is a natural reaction to normal wear and tear of the joint.
If you can do something to better cushion and protect the joints, why not?
Even a healthy dog could benefit from this. There are no harmful side effects and it's relatively inexpensive so to me it's worth it.
 

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I agree exactly the opposite (obviously).
Glucosamine is purported to increase synovial joint fluid. This is the cushioning between joints. More cushioning = less likely bones grind together. Less grinding = less immune response and resulting buildup of bony material = less arthritis
Even healthy joints get arthritic over time, it is a natural reaction to normal wear and tear of the joint.
If you can do something to better cushion and protect the joints, why not?
Even a healthy dog could benefit from this. There are no harmful side effects and it's relatively inexpensive so to me it's worth it.
I've found no research saying glucosamine "protects." If you have some please let me see it (seriously) so I can be better informed.

Here's my question I guess: If your dog develops arthritis or HD, what will you do to provide relief? I would begin providing glucosamine therefore relieving the pain (or at least some of it).

I'm not 100% on no glucosamine without problems, so if you have back-up you could easily persuade me!
 

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the party's crashing us
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I've found no research saying glucosamine "protects." If you have some please let me see it (seriously) so I can be better informed.

Here's my question I guess: If your dog develops arthritis or HD, what will you do to provide relief? I would begin providing glucosamine therefore relieving the pain (or at least some of it).
Sorry I don't have any research articles to site saying it protects or prevents anything, but glucosamine relieves pain in arthritic joints because it helps build up synovial fluid. So doesn't it make sense that if you had a greater amount of fluid or cushioning arthritis would be staved off a bit longer if it is going to occur, or that extra cushioning would provide more shock absorption in a healthy joint during activity? To me this just makes sense.
If the dog later develops arthritis and the existing supplementation of a glucosamine product doesn't alleviate pain, then you'd try a different supplement or pain medication, just like if the dog wasn't on glucosamine before.

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I'm not 100% on no glucosamine without problems, so if you have back-up you could easily persuade me!>>

I'm not sure I'm understanding what you're saying. Are you concerned that an OTC glucosamine product such as GlycoFlex could have harmful side effects if given to a young, healthy dog? Because I've never heard that and frankly can't imagine what ground up mussel shells and brewer's yeast could harm. Fisher is 6 yrs old and has been on GlycoFlex since he was 12 wks old. He was OFA Excellent and elbows normal at 2 yrs (his line has good hip lineage to begin with).
 

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Sorry I don't have any research articles to site saying it protects or prevents anything, but glucosamine relieves pain in arthritic joints because it helps build up synovial fluid. So doesn't it make sense that if you had a greater amount of fluid or cushioning arthritis would be staved off a bit longer if it is going to occur, or that extra cushioning would provide more shock absorption in a healthy joint during activity? To me this just makes sense.
If the dog later develops arthritis and the existing supplementation of a glucosamine product doesn't alleviate pain, then you'd try a different supplement or pain medication, just like if the dog wasn't on glucosamine before.

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I'm not 100% on no glucosamine without problems, so if you have back-up you could easily persuade me!>>

I'm not sure I'm understanding what you're saying. Are you concerned that an OTC glucosamine product such as GlycoFlex could have harmful side effects if given to a young, healthy dog? Because I've never heard that and frankly can't imagine what ground up mussel shells and brewer's yeast could harm. Fisher is 6 yrs old and has been on GlycoFlex since he was 12 wks old. He was OFA Excellent and elbows normal at 2 yrs (his line has good hip lineage to begin with).
No, I don't think glucosamine causes any harmful side effects, I was only saying I'm not totally stuck on giving glucosamine AFTER symptoms start occurring versus giving it as a preventative.
 

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Barley & Mira's Mom
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I posted this earlier, but I will go again. This is from the OFA webpage

"glucosamine products in immature animals genetically predisposed for hip dysplasia may lessen the pathologic changes associated with hip dysplasia."
http://www.offa.org/faq.html#10

That is good enough for me to do it. Also many respected news publications that I read, including Clean Run and the Whole Dog Journal have discussed the benefits as both a preventative and a treatment. I figure there is no harm. If there is a chance it helps, I am on board!
 

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In the Moment
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I give Cosequin DS to the golden girls as a preventative too. For Cody and Syd it is necessary. However, it is important to note that it does act as a mild blood thinner and should be discontinued before any surgical procedure.
 

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I posted this earlier, but I will go again. This is from the OFA webpage

"glucosamine products in immature animals genetically predisposed for hip dysplasia may lessen the pathologic changes associated with hip dysplasia."
http://www.offa.org/faq.html#10

That is good enough for me to do it. Also many respected news publications that I read, including Clean Run and the Whole Dog Journal have discussed the benefits as both a preventative and a treatment. I figure there is no harm. If there is a chance it helps, I am on board!
thanks for posting that
 

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I am not an English Major, but when the OFA website states Reduced caloric intake and glucosomine products.... This would read Reduced caloric intake and Reduced glucosomine products.

Therefore you do not want to give glucosomine products to young dogs as it is actually detrimental to the proper formation of the hip joints. Tighter hips are better then loose hips. I believe glucosomine may cause there to be more of a gap between the ball and socket of the hip by increasing the fluid in the area... Whenever a joint does not fit together the bone actually wears down the cartilage in the joint which later in life causes arthritis. If a joint fits nice and tightly together there is less movement in the joint which would cause less breakdown of the cartilage.
 

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Barley & Mira's Mom
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I am not an English Major, but when the OFA website states Reduced caloric intake and glucosomine products.... This would read Reduced caloric intake and Reduced glucosomine products.
I am pretty sure the way you are interpreting it, is not correct... But I will see if a call to OFA tomorrow will clear that up.
 
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