Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
myself and my fiancé adopted Teddy four months ago when he was 18months old.
I just wondered whether there was any other rescues/adopted GR owners on here?
Be nice to share experiences.

I am particularly interested in how others approach training for an adopted dog where you haven’t had the chance to do their training in puppyhood.
Best wishes all.
Ps photo is of Ted when he was settling in with us and mistaking the doggy door stop for a cuddly toy. He still likes to occasionally make this ‘mistake’ 😉
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,074 Posts
Welcome! We adopted our Teddy at 19 months of age. He came to us with zero training, so it's something I wanted to get on right away. Although he wasn't a tiny, very young pup, we got down to business almost immediately. Started with 2-3 sessions daily of the basics: sit, down, stay, leave it, etc. Each training session lasted 10-20 minutes. Nothing longer as I didn't want to burn him out and lose him. Now that he is 2-1/2 the sessions last a bit longer. Walking nicely on leash has been done each and every time we go out. He is never allowed to pull or tug. I use an upbeat tone to my voice, will change direction if needed and will use a treat as a reward (high value and very small pieces, nothing big). June 9th will be one year since he's come to live with us and he has come leaps and bounds, behaves wonderfully and knows his obedience. We still practice on an almost daily schedule, depending on how I'm feeling. I've been battling some health issues but then again, working with him gets me up and moving.

If you don't want a certain behavior, don't let him get away with it one day and correct him for it the next. Consistency and patience is the key.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,723 Posts
Wonderful to have another adopter on the Forum. Welcome and thank you! We adopted Oscar almost four years ago from YGRR in Hudson, MA. While he arrived with the built in sweetness and love of family genes, his interest in listening to us was minimal. Four years later, with much patience, he is significantly improved. We still cannot let him off lead without being right near him, for when he gets a scent in his nose or sees any type of critter, he is off to the races. He also hates large trucks, particularly UPS (he likes the driver though), as well as the people who come to cut the lawns (more machinery). All of that aside, we are very blessed to have him. To your question about training. We did hire a trainer to work with us for several months to get started, which helped. A three year old dog who was feral on the streets of Istanbul has had experiences that required (and continues to require) patience.
 

·
Puddles
Joined
·
3,818 Posts
Beautiful pup! Congratulations on the new addition. I've adopted many adult golden rescues and been very happy with each one of them. I've had a few that required a bunch of training, it was obvious they grew up in a yard without getting much attention.
But I've had one that needed a different family... one precious boy came from a Marine that was deployed. He was wonderful but he really missed his owner... he was extremely partial to young men with trucks :) I know that sounds silly but if a young man came into the room I could have been on Mars for all he cared. After a year or so he picked someone out of a crowd at a Petsmart adoption event. He picked this same man out of a huge crowd 3 different times at 3 different locations at the pet event that was going on. His kids adored him and the wife could see the connection too. I had not planned on rehoming him and the family had not planned to adopt but this was fate. The family made a donation to the GR rescue that was there and the rescue did all the screening. The rescue even drove the hour to come to my house after the family had been reviewed to pick my boy up. I was crushed but the dog was so excited... ran down the hall to say goodbye to the kittens, ran up to me with a giant "thank you" look and walked out the door with this strange man, got in the car and laid down... never looked back. The family still send me pics at Christmas. Sometimes the happiness of the dog out weighs everything.
 

·
Super Moderator Leader
Joined
·
47,707 Posts
Teddy's a good looking boy, Congratulations!

I adopted my bridge girl through a GR Rescue I used to help. She was 2 when I got her, she lived to 11, lost her to Lymphoma. She had been used for breeding by someone who abused her both physically and verbally, she spent the first 2 years of her life in kennel/cage. She was terrified when I got her, she had never been in a car, touched grass or been in a house before. I had to earn her trust first, took many months before she fully did. House training took about a week, fortunately I had my bridge boy at that time, which made it much easier. I basically started from scratch with her and she learned a lot from my boy.

My current boy I found at my County Shelter, he's 11 now, he was 2 when I adopted him. He's been the easiest dog I've ever had with the exception I had to work with him on leash walking for a few weeks. He's never had to be crated, never has torn up anything, never taken anything off the counters. He had been turned in as a stray but apparently belonged to someone at some point in time because he knew basic commands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi,
Thank you for all your encouraging posts where you shared your and your Rescue Golden’s experiences. Very heartening and motivating.
Ted looks like a pedigree angel and gets a lot of attention when we are out and about for his looks and people are always shocked to hear he is a rescue. I find this unhelpful when I am dying to work on his behaviour.
But there have been issues to work through, he has come on leaps and bounds in just 4 months but still some issues to work on.
He came from a broken home where he had a good start initially but then was neglected when marriage broke down, with regards to training and socialisation and exercise, from approx 9 months to 18 months when he came to us. I feel he missed out on developing at such a crucial time. His main lingering issues are
1. Recall when he is playing with another dog, investigating something interesting. But he never goes far from us. So we can grab him by his harness and put him back on the lead. Sometimes still some thrashing around with open mouth to get away in frustration back to what he wants. But now no longer mouths us. Never chomped down and bitten. Used to growl, now doesn’t.
2. Now only occasional and towards other young intact males, over boisterous play that can turn into dominance display but he usually loses and submits. 9/10 dogs he plays nicely with and will leave dogs alone that don’t want to play with him. That’s an improvement as he used to try to play with every dog he saw. He will also walks past some dogs with disinterest. Gets comments from other owners how nicely he greets/interacts with their dogs. But every now and again he will have a boisterous/dominance contest.He won’t listen and stop until we drag him away or he is submits to other dog. I’ve been told this is his age/stage in development and hormones. But I don’t like it.
3. Recently he has started stealing food from picnics! I now have to keep an eye out for them. Distract him, redirect different direction, if latter not possible put him on the lead.

I feel these issues would decrease if we work on his recall. I had a couple telephone consultations with a dog behaviourists when we first got him. As he had the basic commands down but she though fear based reactions to the overload of new experiences she suggested just patience and consistency and bonding with him for first couple months. Then taking him to adult dog training classes. But just as we were to start lock down In the UK happened!
I wonder whether I have left it to late to do long line training for his recall? But high value treats haven’t got him back before when he has wanted to play with another boisterous dog. So not sure if it will help? will it confuse him when he’s used to being of lead is safe secure walking places? Also concerned us and other owners could get wrapped up in the long line and have an accident if I can’t pull him in quick enough before boisterous play commences!
Lastly he was chemically castrates at 1 year old by previous owner but they wouldn’t say if it was a 6 month or 1 year dose. We suspect 6 months. Our vet has suggested waiting till 1 year from last dose to be safe before chemically castrating again. Although he has never humped anyone or anything with us.
I am reading the behaviour/training discussion threads on here to work out what to do.
Again thanks for sharing your stories very helpful and nice to read.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top