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Discussion Starter #1
Alright there are three speeds that you have to do normal, slow and fast. This much I know lol. My question is what should I do I have a slow gait to begin with. I am much slower than everyone I have ever walked with. Part of the problem is I have bad knees and now a bad hip. I would like to compete with Jige in a yr or so ( have to see how money works out). I have been working very hard this last week on having him heel yesterday was fantastic his should was even with my knee for the half mile that I walked him last night.

Do I pick up my pace if I do competition and during training or go so slow we are down to a complete crawl? I know that you are also timed in rally. I know nothing of obedience competitions.
 

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Don't worry about timing. Especially at the beginning. It only comes into play with equality in points, as a tie breaker. Later it may have more meaning, I don't know.... I am not there yet. Also most rally rings are very small. So your slows and fasts will not be very far. For that matter your regular speed will be interrupted a lot too.

I am trying to teach Gabby "fast" with all fours on the ground. Last match I went to, I just walked fast and the "judge" said I really should run. Well that launches Gabby like a rocket. She loves to engage speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you. My thought were that I could be working on the different paces at the same time I am working on heel and sits. Sort of cross training if you will with what we need for hunt tests and rally. After all it all comes down to obedience.
 

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where the tails wag
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The slow should be about half your normal pace while the fast should be twice your normal pace. That being said, an obvious change of pace is really what they are looking for so if you keep the same cadence but cut your stride length for the slow, this usually looks very smooth and is an obvious change in both of your speeds. For fasts, I run but I don't have physical limitations so perhaps if your break into a faster cadence with the same stride length? Would that be comfortable for you?


In rally, the time is a tie breaker only. In obedience there is no timing :)


BTW: Slow pace is my current bugaboo with Faelan; I should have spent way more time during intial training on it, but frankly it is just not as much fun LOL
 
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Where The Bitches Rule
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The thing that folks forget in obedience is that it is the DOG that must show a change of pace in the "slow" and "fast" not the handler. There are times when the handler "changes" their pace but the dog does not. The judge in turn will then hit you for a substantial point deduction.
 
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Both rally and obedience require the normal heeling pace to be a "brisk" pace. If you are physically unable to keep up a brisk pace you will need to speak with the judge every time before you show.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all. I can do a brisk pace for a short amount of time I just need to take the pain killers first lol.

I have to agree walking even slower than I do is no fun and BaWaaJige seemed utterly bored I think I heard him sighing....it was windy so I am unsure of what I actually heard. hahaha
 

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Kate
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I'm showing up late here and you've already heard it, but the way I was taught for obedience is there needs to be a clear change of pace with the dog. And because the dog and handler are moving as one at the heel, they BOTH have to change pace, or it's a broken heel position.

The regular/normal heel pace is your natural pace. Whatever is normal or comfortable for you.

The slow or fast has to be half or double your natural pace.

In regular novice it's half a ring length at the slow, or a full ring length at the fast. In rally, you are really not going to be going very far between signs.

With my old instructor (years ago), she wanted to see us getting up and running with our dogs. She was a golden person, so she really liked to see the goldens RUNNING at the fast.

And practice does help teach your dogs controlled pace changes - we have all been there with the little rockets next to us.

I DO know of people with mobility issues doing obedience - and definitely changing pace is a struggle for them. I would definitely talk to the judge before you go out there.
 

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Casey and Samson's Mom
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An obvious change from what your normal pace is what would be expected. Letting the judge know that a "brisk" pace may be challenging for you would be helpful, just so they know that you are not moving slowly to accomodate a lagging dog. I have seen very successful (HIT) trainers do it from a wheelchair! A slightly less than average pace should not be a problem, especially if you inform the judge.
 
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