Golden Retriever Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I am going to be choosing my puppy, Saturday, October 24th which is in seven days. Before I choose my puppy I have questions that I need answered. Before I put these questions I will tell you that eventually my golden retriever will become my service dog. I have autism, and that is why I need one. Here are the eleven questions.

  1. Does a service dog have to be fixed?​
  2. If the service dog is not fixed could that cause issues? I know with males if they smell a female they will take off which is why I have this question.​
  3. Can you breed a service dog?​
  4. Can you use a male service dog for stud service? I don't want to breed or use my dog for stud service but my Mom wants me to. I did ask her why and she said that using it for stud service would be easy, and it would be a way for me to earn money (then later she said she thinks it would also help them). As far as breeding she thinks if we did golden doodles we would get enough money from it that my older sisters and maybe my dad would be able to quit there jobs. She hasn't done any research on this type of stuff and she doesn't seem to realize that just because we get the dogs does not mean that they will be cleared for breeding. She didn't research the golden retriever before she said I could get one, now that I have told her some of the health issues that they have and there personality she now isn't so sure that she wants me to get one. I especially don't want to do breeding because my dad is hardly willing to take our animals to the vet when everyone else says that they need to go. At this point I can tell, my mom would not really be in for puppies that are healthy, I mean she would want them to be healthy but she only wants me to do it for the money. I would rather do it for healthy puppies, not for the money.​
  5. Which is better for a service dog, male or female? I want to know what people think make the best one since this is the first puppy I am going to be in charge of. I am also hesitant to get a male dog because I got an adult male dog and it went after my moms dogs neck and it also tried to bite people. I know not all male dogs are like this but still I would rather have a female.​
  6. Now this kind of goes with the last question, if they are not fixed does that change which one works better for a service dog?​
  7. If you can't have a visible fence how do you teach your puppy the yard limits? I know it is possible but I don't know how to do it, I have tried finding things on it but I just can't seem to find anything in the books I got, usually books just say you need a visible fence.​
  8. Is there a way to let the puppy run in the yard without a fence before it's taught the yard limits?​
  9. Can you do agility if you don't want to breed your dog? My mom and some of my sisters have read that the reason you don't have dogs fixed when you do agility is because if you win then you will be expected to breed your dog. My younger sister is going to be getting a puppy, it's not a golden retriever but she wants to do agility with her dog and I think it would be nice to try if possible, but I don't know if you can do it with a service dog or not.​
  10. Can you do agility with a service dog?​
  11. Last question, I am going to be getting my puppy at the end of November beginning of December so it will be cold when it comes home. Just in case my dog needs them I am wanting recommendations of good places to get boots and jackets.​

Some of these questions can be answered after the 24th but I would appreciate it if most of them where answered before I choose my dog. Thank you!
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
21,428 Posts
I'll answer -

  1. Does a service dog have to be fixed? - No, however most breeders want you to neuter/spay + it may be necessary depending on where you live.
  2. If the service dog is not fixed could that cause issues? I know with males if they smell a female they will take off which is why I have this question. - Depends on training/caretaking. My dogs are all intact, and the most that I see is them OBSESSING about pee spots where a girlie in season has been. Seriously speaking though, keeping a dog intact means a huge responsibility. You have to commit to training your dog and not let him get loose to bother other people's dogs. Same thing if you have a girlie. MORE so if you have a girlie. Additionally, she can have serious health issues if left intact. These are things to talk to a breeder about.
  3. Can you breed a service dog? - That would put a dog out of commission, wouldn't it? What if your dog dies while giving birth to puppies? That would be extra heartbreaking because this dog had a very serious job in life for you.
  4. Can you use a male service dog for stud service? I don't want to breed or use my dog for stud service but my Mom wants me to. I did ask her why and she said that using it for stud service would be easy, and it would be a way for me to earn money (then later she said she thinks it would also help them). As far as breeding she thinks if we did golden doodles we would get enough money from it that my older sisters and maybe my dad would be able to quit there jobs. She hasn't done any research on this type of stuff and she doesn't seem to realize that just because we get the dogs does not mean that they will be cleared for breeding. She didn't research the golden retriever before she said I could get one, now that I have told her some of the health issues that they have and there personality she now isn't so sure that she wants me to get one. I especially don't want to do breeding because my dad is hardly willing to take our animals to the vet when everyone else says that they need to go. At this point I can tell, my mom would not really be in for puppies that are healthy, I mean she would want them to be healthy but she only wants me to do it for the money. I would rather do it for healthy puppies, not for the money. - Oh God. Your mom is a reputable breeder's worst nightmare. That's all I can say. :)
  5. Which is better for a service dog, male or female? I want to know what people think make the best one since this is the first puppy I am going to be in charge of. I am also hesitant to get a male dog because I got an adult male dog and it went after my moms dogs neck and it also tried to bite people. I know not all male dogs are like this but still I would rather have a female. - Boys are bigger. Girlies mature (mentally) faster + sometimes live a year longer. Temperament issues should not be a thing either sex if you go with a good breeder. That said, if there are other dogs in the house - that is something to discuss with a breeder.
  6. Now this kind of goes with the last question, if they are not fixed does that change which one works better for a service dog? -- Referring to the ideas your mom has, I would say your dog needs to be neutered to keep your mom out of trouble.
  7. If you can't have a visible fence how do you teach your puppy the yard limits? I know it is possible but I don't know how to do it, I have tried finding things on it but I just can't seem to find anything in the books I got, usually books just say you need a visible fence. Breeders typically REQUIRE a fenced yard.
  8. Is there a way to let the puppy run in the yard without a fence before it's taught the yard limits? If you start with a puppy, they can be conditioned to stay close and want to be with you. Additionally, if they get enough space to run around every day, they don't have the "run for the hills" drive - or not as much. Dogs who are always on leash and kept back, freedom blows their brains when they get loose.
  9. Can you do agility if you don't want to breed your dog? My mom and some of my sisters have read that the reason you don't have dogs fixed when you do agility is because if you win then you will be expected to breed your dog. My younger sister is going to be getting a puppy, it's not a golden retriever but she wants to do agility with her dog and I think it would be nice to try if possible, but I don't know if you can do it with a service dog or not. Hmm... lots of people neuter their dogs while playing in agility. More so, I think, than some of the other sports. That said - is this the service dog you are talking about or is your family looking to get multiple puppies one for each daughter....?
  10. Can you do agility with a service dog? Yes.
  11. Last question, I am going to be getting my puppy at the end of November beginning of December so it will be cold when it comes home. Just in case my dog needs them I am wanting recommendations of good places to get boots and jackets. You don't need for golden puppies. Because of course you will be keeping the dog INDOORS with you. Dogs do not belong outside when their families are inside.
Some of these questions can be answered after the 24th but I would appreciate it if most of them where answered before I choose my dog. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Can you use a male service dog for stud service? I don't want to breed or use my dog for stud service but my Mom wants me to. I did ask her why and she said that using it for stud service would be easy, and it would be a way for me to earn money (then later she said she thinks it would also help them). As far as breeding she thinks if we did golden doodles we would get enough money from it that my older sisters and maybe my dad would be able to quit there jobs. She hasn't done any research on this type of stuff and she doesn't seem to realize that just because we get the dogs does not mean that they will be cleared for breeding. She didn't research the golden retriever before she said I could get one, now that I have told her some of the health issues that they have and there personality she now isn't so sure that she wants me to get one. I especially don't want to do breeding because my dad is hardly willing to take our animals to the vet when everyone else says that they need to go. At this point I can tell, my mom would not really be in for puppies that are healthy, I mean she would want them to be healthy but she only wants me to do it for the money. I would rather do it for healthy puppies, not for the money.
You have a lot of questions that I am not qualified to answer. However, having recently purchased a golden retriever, I can, however, offer one piece of "real world observation".

Most puppies are going to be sold to consumers under a "limited AKC registration". Short version, they're not meant to be bred. And, if you do breed them, any offspring are not eligible for AKC registration (assuming breeding with another AKC registered dog).

If you get a female, then (a) there's a limited number of litters that are reasonable, and (b) having her bred will, at least for a span of time, remove her from her role as a service dog. If you get a male, then having them intact may be an issue for their primary role as a service dog. You'll want to talk to people who train service dogs for their input. Unless someone posting here says "I train service dogs and...", then the opinions you receive (including mine) should be verified.

Frankly, it sounds like your #1 issue may be reining in your mom. I'd be PO'd if my service dog became the family's business.
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
21,428 Posts
Most puppies are going to be sold to consumers under a "limited AKC registration". Short version, they're not meant to be bred. And, if you do breed them, any offspring are not eligible for AKC registration (assuming breeding with another AKC registered dog).
Problem is her mom is thinking about producing MUTTTTTTS. She's looking to go into partnership with all the shelters out there looking for more unwanted mixed breeds and badly bred dogs to flow in there. :( No AKC registration for intact mixed breeds, but that doesn't stop people from making them - because, yanno, AKC is the bad guy.

That's not the OP's fault - she probably just wants a dog. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
I have unlimited registration of my female. Granted she is not a service dog but she can check the male ;).
I will be spaying her. Why? Because I have no knowledge of breeding dogs, she is not going to be going through all the testing a reputable breeder would, you Don't get enough litters out of a dog to live on and she is my baby girl, I want her to be my fur baby. Her job is to be my girl, not to pop puppies out so people in the house can quit their jobs.
Some breeders can make a living on breeding their dogs but that is their whole life. Vet appts, testing, emergencies and they don't just have one dog.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
Service dog organizations that have their own breeding programs have a 50-60% success rate. Please know that the probability the puppy you buy will be suited for service dog work will likely be less than that. You should plan on buying a pet and if it works out to be a service dog, then awesome!

If you truly need a service dog, I highly recommend applying with a service dog organization that provides service dogs at no cost to the recipient. (Service dog organizations spay/neuter their service dogs.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,044 Posts
I think your situation is a trainwreck waiting to happen. I wouldn't sell a puppy to a kid to use as a SD, would require an on board adult who's committed to the training and would require a desexing because how can a dog be a SD and a parent in real life... and the whole 'stop work' on the repro organs of the dog, that's just wrong on so many levels. If you are doing the picking, you don't have a good breeder so you are already on the short end of the stick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
692 Posts
I think you have one very large misunderstanding about breeding Goldens. You cannot make much money by breeding your dog, if you do the breeding properly. First, your puppy should be identified by the breeder as a good puppy to breed, and that generally will cost more assuming the breeder will even let you breed her pup. Many won't if you are not an experienced breeder.

The parents of the puppy you get, both, should have full health clearances to avoid the breeding from passing on diseases and malformations that can be avoided. Doing this adds cost to the breeder that would be included in the cost of the puppies.

If your pup's parents do not have full health clearances, your pup may have a health problem you will not know about for a while. So avoid buying a dog without parents health certifications, they can be troublesome and expensive to care for.

To use a male dog for a 'breeding' dog, the dog must have full health clearances, this costs you money.

Almost all people when looking for a stud dog to use, expect that male to have some form of performance titles. Hunting titles, Agility Titles, Obedience Titles, and/or Confirmation Titles....these require extensive training and experience to earn these titles. Accordingly, without a performance title you would have a very small chance of getting anyone to use your dog for stud breeding.

If you have a female, you have to get health certificates, frequent health checks by your vet, be prepared to pay for a c section if the dog cannot have the puppies normally, accept the fact that some dogs die from having puppies, understand that a litter can be as small as one puppy. And again without both parents having some form of performance title and full health certifications, you may not be able to sell the pups. In this case you may have to give them away for little or no money...and you will lose all the money you spent!

My advise, do not consider breeding your dog. Have it 'fixed' as soon as your vet thinks it can be done...

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
593 Posts
Service dog organizations that have their own breeding programs have a 50-60% success rate. Please know that the probability the puppy you buy will be suited for service dog work will likely be less than that. You should plan on buying a pet and if it works out to be a service dog, then awesome!

If you truly need a service dog, I highly recommend applying with a service dog organization that provides service dogs at no cost to the recipient. (Service dog organizations spay/neuter their service dogs.)
Probably the most on-point response so far. Forget questions about breed, or neuter/spay. You're going down a road that is likely to end up with a "pet", not a "service dog". If you truly need a service dog, go through an organization that focuses on just this.

Frequently, on this forum, people asking about puppies are advised to "shop breeders, not puppies". Your situation is slightly different, but the same type of advice seems applicable. If what you need is a service dog, go to people that provide service dogs. Not all "potential service dogs" make the cut, and that's with being trained by people who focus on just that.

One of my co-workers has a child with severe autism, and they recently "retired" their service dog and brought on a replacement. The retired service dog is a golden doodle, although (based on appearance), about 75% golden. The new service dog is a full poodle. My point? It's about a dog, "that" dog, and not a breed. Granted, some breeds have more potential, but that doesn't mean all puppies within that breed do...and half of those will not pan out.

Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I think you have one very large misunderstanding about breeding Goldens. You cannot make much money by breeding your dog, if you do the breeding properly. First, your puppy should be identified by the breeder as a good puppy to breed, and that generally will cost more assuming the breeder will even let you breed her pup. Many won't if you are not an experienced breeder.

The parents of the puppy you get, both, should have full health clearances to avoid the breeding from passing on diseases and malformations that can be avoided. Doing this adds cost to the breeder that would be included in the cost o
I'll answer -

  1. Does a service dog have to be fixed? - No, however most breeders want you to neuter/spay + it may be necessary depending on where you live.
  2. If the service dog is not fixed could that cause issues? I know with males if they smell a female they will take off which is why I have this question. - Depends on training/caretaking. My dogs are all intact, and the most that I see is them OBSESSING about pee spots where a girlie in season has been. Seriously speaking though, keeping a dog intact means a huge responsibility. You have to commit to training your dog and not let him get loose to bother other people's dogs. Same thing if you have a girlie. MORE so if you have a girlie. Additionally, she can have serious health issues if left intact. These are things to talk to a breeder about.
  3. Can you breed a service dog? - That would put a dog out of commission, wouldn't it? What if your dog dies while giving birth to puppies? That would be extra heartbreaking because this dog had a very serious job in life for you.
  4. Can you use a male service dog for stud service? I don't want to breed or use my dog for stud service but my Mom wants me to. I did ask her why and she said that using it for stud service would be easy, and it would be a way for me to earn money (then later she said she thinks it would also help them). As far as breeding she thinks if we did golden doodles we would get enough money from it that my older sisters and maybe my dad would be able to quit there jobs. She hasn't done any research on this type of stuff and she doesn't seem to realize that just because we get the dogs does not mean that they will be cleared for breeding. She didn't research the golden retriever before she said I could get one, now that I have told her some of the health issues that they have and there personality she now isn't so sure that she wants me to get one. I especially don't want to do breeding because my dad is hardly willing to take our animals to the vet when everyone else says that they need to go. At this point I can tell, my mom would not really be in for puppies that are healthy, I mean she would want them to be healthy but she only wants me to do it for the money. I would rather do it for healthy puppies, not for the money. - Oh God. Your mom is a reputable breeder's worst nightmare. That's all I can say. :)
  5. Which is better for a service dog, male or female? I want to know what people think make the best one since this is the first puppy I am going to be in charge of. I am also hesitant to get a male dog because I got an adult male dog and it went after my moms dogs neck and it also tried to bite people. I know not all male dogs are like this but still I would rather have a female. - Boys are bigger. Girlies mature (mentally) faster + sometimes live a year longer. Temperament issues should not be a thing either sex if you go with a good breeder. That said, if there are other dogs in the house - that is something to discuss with a breeder.
  6. Now this kind of goes with the last question, if they are not fixed does that change which one works better for a service dog? -- Referring to the ideas your mom has, I would say your dog needs to be neutered to keep your mom out of trouble.
  7. If you can't have a visible fence how do you teach your puppy the yard limits? I know it is possible but I don't know how to do it, I have tried finding things on it but I just can't seem to find anything in the books I got, usually books just say you need a visible fence. Breeders typically REQUIRE a fenced yard.
  8. Is there a way to let the puppy run in the yard without a fence before it's taught the yard limits? If you start with a puppy, they can be conditioned to stay close and want to be with you. Additionally, if they get enough space to run around every day, they don't have the "run for the hills" drive - or not as much. Dogs who are always on leash and kept back, freedom blows their brains when they get loose.
  9. Can you do agility if you don't want to breed your dog? My mom and some of my sisters have read that the reason you don't have dogs fixed when you do agility is because if you win then you will be expected to breed your dog. My younger sister is going to be getting a puppy, it's not a golden retriever but she wants to do agility with her dog and I think it would be nice to try if possible, but I don't know if you can do it with a service dog or not. Hmm... lots of people neuter their dogs while playing in agility. More so, I think, than some of the other sports. That said - is this the service dog you are talking about or is your family looking to get multiple puppies one for each daughter....?
  10. Can you do agility with a service dog? Yes.
  11. Last question, I am going to be getting my puppy at the end of November beginning of December so it will be cold when it comes home. Just in case my dog needs them I am wanting recommendations of good places to get boots and jackets. You don't need for golden puppies. Because of course you will be keeping the dog INDOORS with you. Dogs do not belong outside when their families are inside.
Some of these questions can be answered after the 24th but I would appreciate it if most of them where answered before I choose my dog. Thank you!
I do agree, with this. My younger sister is getting a puppy, so that question was more for her then for me. I am wondering can it cause issues getting two puppies around the same time? I am going to be getting a puppy and then one of my cousins who works with dogs and has been training different types including service dogs will be training my puppy eventually to become my service dog. I asked the question about the jacket and boots because I am outside a lot especially in winter and summer since those are my two favorite seasons. Usually in winter I will be outside for hours, even when I get cold I don't like to come in. I know that my puppy will probably not be outside for all of that time, but I also asked this question because I have read that some golden retrievers will need them when taken outside.Thank you for your help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I think you have one very large misunderstanding about breeding Goldens. You cannot make much money by breeding your dog, if you do the breeding properly. First, your puppy should be identified by the breeder as a good puppy to breed, and that generally will cost more assuming the breeder will even let you breed her pup. Many won't if you are not an experienced breeder.

The parents of the puppy you get, both, should have full health clearances to avoid the breeding from passing on diseases and malformations that can be avoided. Doing this adds cost to the breeder that would be included in the cost of the puppies.

If your pup's parents do not have full health clearances, your pup may have a health problem you will not know about for a while. So avoid buying a dog without parents health certifications, they can be troublesome and expensive to care for.

To use a male dog for a 'breeding' dog, the dog must have full health clearances, this costs you money.

Almost all people when looking for a stud dog to use, expect that male to have some form of performance titles. Hunting titles, Agility Titles, Obedience Titles, and/or Confirmation Titles....these require extensive training and experience to earn these titles. Accordingly, without a performance title you would have a very small chance of getting anyone to use your dog for stud breeding.

If you have a female, you have to get health certificates, frequent health checks by your vet, be prepared to pay for a c section if the dog cannot have the puppies normally, accept the fact that some dogs die from having puppies, understand that a litter can be as small as one puppy. And again without both parents having some form of performance title and full health certifications, you may not be able to sell the pups. In this case you may have to give them away for little or no money...and you will lose all the money you spent!

My advise, do not consider breeding your dog. Have it 'fixed' as soon as your vet thinks it can be done...

Good luck
I know most of this stuff, but my mom does not. I read in books that unless you do it right you won't get any money and I totally see how you don't really know if you will get any money for the puppies because who knows if they would even sell. I have tried explaining this to my mom but she doesn't seem to be able to see any of what you said.
It's really up to my parents about spaying/neutering the puppy, not me. I am hoping that if they decide not to spay/neuter that my mom will understand that I don't want to do breeding or stud service. I think she wouldn't think about doing this but one of my cousins does stud service.
I am not considering breeding my dog, but I am hoping by getting a bit of information I will be able to explain my reasons for not wanting to breed my dog better, that is why I asked the questions about breeding and stud service.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
You have a lot of questions that I am not qualified to answer. However, having recently purchased a golden retriever, I can, however, offer one piece of "real world observation".

Most puppies are going to be sold to consumers under a "limited AKC registration". Short version, they're not meant to be bred. And, if you do breed them, any offspring are not eligible for AKC registration (assuming breeding with another AKC registered dog).

If you get a female, then (a) there's a limited number of litters that are reasonable, and (b) having her bred will, at least for a span of time, remove her from her role as a service dog. If you get a male, then having them intact may be an issue for their primary role as a service dog. You'll want to talk to people who train service dogs for their input. Unless someone posting here says "I train service dogs and...", then the opinions you receive (including mine) should be verified.

Frankly, it sounds like your #1 issue may be reining in your mom. I'd be PO'd if my service dog became the family's business.
I don't want to breed or use my dog for stud service. I just need to get my mom to see my reasons for this. Thank you for your help. I will be seeing what my cousin thinks on some of these questions. Thanks a lot! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Service dog organizations that have their own breeding programs have a 50-60% success rate. Please know that the probability the puppy you buy will be suited for service dog work will likely be less than that. You should plan on buying a pet and if it works out to be a service dog, then awesome!

If you truly need a service dog, I highly recommend applying with a service dog organization that provides service dogs at no cost to the recipient. (Service dog organizations spay/neuter their service dogs.)
I have a cousin who will be training my dog to be a service dog. She has trained dogs for several years including service dogs and dogs for agility. She also suggested that we go with this breeder and type of dog when we where looking for a dog for me.
I have autism.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,275 Posts
I think you have one very large misunderstanding about breeding Goldens. You cannot make much money by breeding your dog, if you do the breeding properly. First, your puppy should be identified by the breeder as a good puppy to breed, and that generally will cost more assuming the breeder will even let you breed her pup. Many won't if you are not an experienced breeder.

The parents of the puppy you get, both, should have full health clearances to avoid the breeding from passing on diseases and malformations that can be avoided. Doing this adds cost to the breeder that would be included in the cost of the puppies.

If your pup's parents do not have full health clearances, your pup may have a health problem you will not know about for a while. So avoid buying a dog without parents health certifications, they can be troublesome and expensive to care for.

To use a male dog for a 'breeding' dog, the dog must have full health clearances, this costs you money.

Almost all people when looking for a stud dog to use, expect that male to have some form of performance titles. Hunting titles, Agility Titles, Obedience Titles, and/or Confirmation Titles....these require extensive training and experience to earn these titles. Accordingly, without a performance title you would have a very small chance of getting anyone to use your dog for stud breeding.

If you have a female, you have to get health certificates, frequent health checks by your vet, be prepared to pay for a c section if the dog cannot have the puppies normally, accept the fact that some dogs die from having puppies, understand that a litter can be as small as one puppy. And again without both parents having some form of performance title and full health certifications, you may not be able to sell the pups. In this case you may have to give them away for little or no money...and you will lose all the money you spent!

My advise, do not consider breeding your dog. Have it 'fixed' as soon as your vet thinks it can be done...

Good luck
These people have no intention of breeding responsibly, they only want to make money.

Original Poster, you sound very young. Will you even get a choice in spaying or neutering your dog? If your mom is using them to produce puppies the dog will not be able to act as your service dog.

Spay or neuter your dog. If you have any control over it, don't allow them to be bred.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,275 Posts
Also, getting puppies very close in age will result in the puppies playing with each other and your puppy not learning to pay attention to you exclusively. Unless you seclude it from the other puppy, it will grow wanting to play with and be with the other puppy and not focus on working for you.

Let me guess, your mom wants to get a male puppy and a female puppy so she can breed them together. I'll make a wild guess, she wants a Golden puppy and a Poodle puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
These people have no intention of breeding responsibly, they only want to make money.

Original Poster, you sound very young. Will you even get a choice in spaying or neutering your dog? If your mom is using them to produce puppies the dog will not be able to act as your service dog.

Spay or neuter your dog. If you have any control over it, don't allow them to be bred.
Also, getting puppies very close in age will result in the puppies playing with each other and your puppy not learning to pay attention to you exclusively. Unless you seclude it from the other puppy, it will grow wanting to play with and be with the other puppy and not focus on working for you.

Let me guess, your mom wants to get a male puppy and a female puppy so she can breed them together. I'll make a wild guess, she wants a Golden puppy and a Poodle puppy.
I know that as far as acting as my service dog, but I kind of was asking the questions so that I would have more information so maybe I could more easily have my mom understand my reasons for not breeding or stud service. I have a hard time of getting people to understand me. I have autism.
I think once I tell my mom that I don't want them bred and I tell her my reasons as well as some information I think she will quit bringing up the subject.
Thank you for that information on the two puppies.
No, my younger sister is getting a puppy and my mom did not tell her you have to go with this breed. My sister decided on the breed, a red or blue healer. We won't be breeding the two together either and as far as I know we won't be getting a poodle.
 

·
Kate
Joined
·
21,428 Posts
If you are doing the picking, you don't have a good breeder so you are already on the short end of the stick.
I don't think this is a sign that a breeder is not a good breeder.... as I said elsewhere....

However, I really hate to say this because this isn't about the OP, but her parents - there are 3-4 red flags that would cause big concerns for an actual good breeder. :(

1. Mom's ideas on not only making a little money off the dogs, but also on producing mutts with the dog they bring home whether it's male or female.

2. The mention of Dad being adverse to bringing dogs to the vet as needed.

3. I counted at least 1 adult dog (Mom's) already in the home, but multiple puppies are being purchased for multiple kids in the family. That's a concerning setup, not even touching on the fact that one of the pups is a heeler.

4. No fenced yard and at least one of the puppies (heeler) being a runner breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Service dog organizations that have their own breeding programs have a 50-60% success rate. Please know that the probability the puppy you buy will be suited for service dog work will likely be less than that. You should plan on buying a pet and if it works out to be a service dog, then awesome!

If you truly need a service dog, I highly recommend applying with a service dog organization that provides service dogs at no cost to the recipient. (Service dog organizations spay/neuter their service dogs.)
Yeah I was going to say, I see very often people saying they want to raise a service dog, without realizing that not all dogs, even with the right lineage, are cut out for service dog work. You very well could end up with a dog that is just too interested in his/her environment and not motivated enough to work.

Nothing wrong with that of course if you just want a pet. My dog is just way too interested in people, other dogs, sniffing the ground, it's been a struggle enough to get him to focus on commands that service dog work is probably beyond his capability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Hi Princessmk,

I would like to say that I think you are expressing yourself well on this post and that gives me hope that you will be able to express to your mum the knowledge you have gained as to why you do not want to breed from your dog.
I also think it’s very commendable that your are seeking info to be better informed.

I am concerned that your parents are not considering the best welfare of a golden retriever or any dog in their care. Just like a human it is very important that you seek medical care for them when needed. Little things can turn into serious things if not treated and it is cruel to put a dog through needless discomfort or pain by not seeking vet treatment. Are they going to get pet insurance for the dog/s?

Lastly getting two puppies at once when you want to train one to be a service dog does seem like a bad idea for training your dog. Is there any chance your sister could wait to get her dog for a while to give you a better chance at training your dog?

Again well done for coming on this forum and communicating with others to educate yourself and your family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
1. Mom's ideas on not only making a little money off the dogs, but also on producing mutts with the dog they bring home whether it's male or female.

2. The mention of Dad being adverse to bringing dogs to the vet as needed.
I have talked with a cousin of mine who works with dogs on some of these questions, I got the answers that I thought I would, my dog will be being fixed and so of course no breeding.

My Dad will take animals to the vet, but at times if he thinks it's not needed he will say that the animal doesn't need to go, when that happens the rest of us, including my mom will do our best to change his mind. Most time it works and the animal is taken to the vet, there is only one time it didn't and it turned out that it was nothing at all.

Hi Princessmk,

I would like to say that I think you are expressing yourself well on this post and that gives me hope that you will be able to express to your mum the knowledge you have gained as to why you do not want to breed from your dog.
I also think it’s very commendable that your are seeking info to be better informed.

I am concerned that your parents are not considering the best welfare of a golden retriever or any dog in their care. Just like a human it is very important that you seek medical care for them when needed. Little things can turn into serious things if not treated and it is cruel to put a dog through needless discomfort or pain by not seeking vet treatment. Are they going to get pet insurance for the dog/s?

Lastly getting two puppies at once when you want to train one to be a service dog does seem like a bad idea for training your dog. Is there any chance your sister could wait to get her dog for a while to give you a better chance at training your dog?

Again well done for coming on this forum and communicating with others to educate yourself and your family.
My mom was beginning to see that it probably wouldn't work to do breeding with a service dog and as I said above, we won't be doing any breeding.

My Dad will take animals to the vet, but at times if he thinks it's not needed he will say that the animal doesn't need to go, when that happens the rest of us, including my mom will do our best to change his mind. Most time it works and the animal is taken to the vet, there is only one time it didn't and it turned out that it was nothing at all. I just hope that he won't refuse any other time. I have no idea on that, I didn't really know there was such a thing until I had read books on the golden retriever.

No, there isn't. I am hoping there won't be any issues with one being trained to be a service dog. I have a cousin who will be helping train our dogs, my younger sisters dog to do herding and my dog to be a service dog.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top