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I read that when you get ready to leave the house and put your puppy in the crate, that you are not supposed to have any words with the puppy. Kind of like putting the puppy inside, close the door, don't look back and out the door you go. Is this proper? Do you here on the forum really do it this way? No goodbye's, nothing? I need a bit more rationale and/or reassurance on this one.
On arriving home from being out. I read that you come into your home and ignore your puppy/dog for a few minutes and then open the door of the crate, say your hello's and take the dog/puppy outside.
I may be from a different mindset and need to get with the times, but I always said goodbye and or see you later to my dog. Upon arriving home, I made a big deal, big hello's, used a happy high pitched voice to show my excitement and happiness to be home and be with my dog. Have times really changed?
 

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Chester & Murphy's Mom
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I tell my guys goodbye...we don't make a big deal about it, I don't want to get them excited before leaving. They both get a small cookie, Murphy goes in his crate and we leave. When we come home we act glad to see them and them us...but for the most part we just take them out the back door for a quick pee.
 

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I always say Good-by and use the same words. I think the intent is not too make a big fuss. I always just say "Bye Bye-see you later" and leave. The dogs know that means I will be back-or at least, I like to think they know that :) I have noticed that if they are starting to come with me, when I say that, they all back up and sit down.

The point of not making a big fuss when you return accomplishes two things-if you have a submissive/excitable pee-er, this lessens the chance of that happening, and it keeps the dogs from becoming overexcited, knocking you over, etc.

When I return, I just come in the door, don't make a fuss but smile. The Goldens are mildly happy to see me (wagging tails, toys in mouths), the Pug is a little more excited and Cher the Chinese Crested goes wild :) At 6 pounds, though, she can't knock me over and it's kind of cute.
 

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Tracer, Rumor & Cady
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Nearly the exact same thing here!

I always say Good-by and use the same words. I think the intent is not too make a big fuss. I always just say "Bye Bye-see you later" and leave. The dogs know that means I will be back-or at least, I like to think they know that :) I have noticed that if they are starting to come with me, when I say that, they all back up and sit down.

The point of not making a big fuss when you return accomplishes two things-if you have a submissive/excitable pee-er, this lessens the chance of that happening, and it keeps the dogs from becoming overexcited, knocking you over, etc.

When I return, I just come in the door, don't make a fuss but smile. The Goldens are mildly happy to see me (wagging tails, toys in mouths), the Pug is a little more excited and Cher the Chinese Crested goes wild :) At 6 pounds, though, she can't knock me over and it's kind of cute.
 

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Tess and Liza
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I always say goodbye to Tess. When I come back, I don't make a fuss, just tell her Hi again and open her crate. Of course, when she comes out, half asleep and wagging her tail, I cuddle...(who could resist...?). But I never change the pitch of my voice.
 

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My good byes are really uneventful, I was told the same thing. Pretty much, "Bye, be a good boy".

MacKenzie is crated in another room, we don't say anything to her.

They already know you are leaving by your habits, picking up the keys, your purse.

Our hellos are a different story.
 

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IKE- Canine Blood Donor
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I've always said a farewell too, though mine became "I'm going to the Store now." By accident, it became what Sam understood to mean that I/we are going out without him. He'd hear me say "I'm going to the store now," and go lay down by the front door. I've taught Ike the same. It works great too. I just say "I'm going...." and he goes immediately to his 'I'm waiting for Mom to get home' place. I don't use a crate, so their places were spots near the front door landing.
 

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Nancy
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I tell my guys goodbye...we don't make a big deal about it, I don't want to get them excited before leaving. They both get a small cookie, Murphy goes in his crate and we leave. When we come home we act glad to see them and them us...but for the most part we just take them out the back door for a quick pee.
Yep, same here.
 

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Mandy's Mom
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After you say "bye-bye see you later" don't you say "have a good day, be good" and "I love you?" I always be sure to add the "I love you" after I imagine her saying "have a good day, mom."
 

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I think the idea is just to make it matter of fact so that the dog doesn't come to see being separated from you as a terrible thing. If you treat your departure as matter-of-fact, the dog may be less likely to suffer separation anxiety. And if you celebrate getting out of the crate too much, he may begin to think that getting out of the crate is MUCH better than going in and start to resist the crate.

These days, I always tell Rookie the same phrase when I leave, but I do it in a matter-of-fact voice, and he always get a very low key hello with a quick ear rub when I get home.
 

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I calmly say "Be good boys, I love you!", when I leave, but when I come home Murphy goes straight out the door to go potty. Then when he comes in he can be loved on.
 

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I don't think high energy departures and arrivals are a problem unless your dog is getting over-excited about your arrivals or over-anxious about your departures. Most of us keep things low key as a preventative measure since it's easier to head these things off than to fix them, but lots of dogs would probably do just fine either way.

Ajax is a high-energy ball of muscle, so we ignore him for the first ten or so minutes we're home, and we ask company to do the same. If we don't, he gets wound up and bumps into people too hard. He needs to learn that settling down is what gets him attention and affection, so we don't give him those things when he's too wound up.

Comet, on the other hand, is much more low-key about arrivals and departures, so he gets more attention during those times.

I think this is a situation where you match your actions to the dog's personality. There's no cookie cutter "right" way to arrive or depart, though there are smart things to do to prevent anxiety or deal with it once it appears.
 

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We always say goodbye to our dogs. We don't make a huge deal out of it, though. We just usually say something like, "Bye! Be back in a little while!" and then go. When we come home, Tucker usually gets very excited and acts like he hasn't seen us in a month, so we don't pay any attention to him until he starts to settle down.
 

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For Payton, we get a treat and say "go to your room" and she runs to her crate. We give her the treat, give her a little pet on the top of the head and say "Goodbye and we'll be back" and then leave. She knows as soon as we get our keys or I grab my purse that we are leaving, but if she sees us go to the treats she knows she's staying home.
When we get home I go in and open the crate. She runs out straight to the back door. Once she's peed, she comes running in to say hello to everyone.
 

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I vary. Scout is no longer crated but when she was I would either put her away and leave without saying a thing or just say something matter-of-fact. I think getting too excited on the return or leave can help create separation anxiety--but also in general I think it is better manners for a dog to be calm when you come and go. It is hard though, because it is very rewarding for us to see them get excited and show how much they missed us!

I also saw this on SuperNanny with a little boy. His mom would make a parade about going to work. Apologizing, hugging, dragging out the goodbyes, saying I love you I don't want to go...etc. Jo stepped in and had the mom change her protocol. She'd tell her son she was leaving, get a quick hug and go. The manner made a huge improvement on this boy's behavior. He just sat there and played rather than throwing a royal fit because mom was leaving him and she was sorry.
 

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Humankind. Be both.
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The other reason to be low key when you leave and return is to minimize the associated emotions. High-drama coming and going can, in some dogs, contribute to separation anxiety.

Another advantage to ignoring the dogs when you get home is that you're less likely to be jumped on and "mauled" as you walk in the door. My dogs barely lift a head when I come in b/c they never get attention then. I like to come in, put my stuff down, pee if I have to... and THEN say hi to my dogs.
 

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When I put the dogs up in the morning I usually say something like "I'll be back this afternoon" and sometimes I'll add a "I love you guys." But I say it for me more than them, and it's said in a fairly flat tone of voice.When I return I open all the crate doors (my dogs are trained not to get out of the crate just because the door is open), open the backdoor, and then release them from their crates to go outside. They get attention from me when I let them back inside.When I come home in the afternoons, my dogs happily but calmly stand up and wait to be let outside. Times that my mom (who makes a big production out of it) goes over and lets them out, the dogs get really chaotic, slamming into their crates, busting out as soon as the door is open, and jumping all over her.
 
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