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AAARF!
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I have a question about bladder stones and Hill’s c/d Prescription food. Back in June, Rindy passed a few bladder stones. I had an x-ray done and she had quite a few more so the vet put her on s/d food to dissolve the stones. After a bit of time we had a follow-up x-ray and the stones were gone. The vet then put Rindy on c/d food and said she needed to be on it the rest of her life. I’m questioning if she really does need to be on c/d food. Has anyone else had a dog with bladder stones and did your vet tell you they needed to be on c/d permanently?

Here are the ingredients for the c/d food:

Whole Grain Corn, Pork Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), Chicken By-Product Meal, Soybean Meal, Corn Gluten Meal, Soybean Mill Run, Chicken Liver Flavor, Calcium Sulfate, Soybean Oil, Flaxseed, Iodized Salt, L-Lysine, Choline Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, vitamins (L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Vitamin E Supplement, Taurine, Potassium Chloride, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), preserved with Mixed Tocopherols & Citric Acid, Phosphoric Acid, Beta-Carotene, Rosemary Extract.

Protein 22.3, Fat 22.1, Carbohydrate 47.9, Crude Fiber 2.7

I guess I’m afraid if I take her off the food she’ll develop bladder stones, but I don’t know this for sure. I also want her to be a healthy and active girl and I don’t think this is the best food possible for her. Hopefully someone else on the forum has dealt with this!
 

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Gunner and Honey's Mom
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I'm sorry that I have no experience in this area. I'm sorry your Rindy went through this....If no one else has any advise on here I might check with another vet. Get a second opinion. Good luck.
 
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Dr. Rainheart
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I am not sure either; I am not familiar with the c/d food. Maybe it is possible you can find a food that is similar to this out on the market or perhaps you can do a home-cooked diet?
 
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My little spaniel, Tess, has persistent bladder stones. There are evidently two kinds--one that responds to diet and one that doesn't. When they tested her stones, they thought she had the latter, so she had surgery. But she kept getting them and had more infections, so they did a trial on the prescription food (she's on Canin though) and it worked really well. She is still prone to infections but her bladder is clear of stones when checked.

I was told she has to be on it for the rest of her life. I haven't questioned that since I didn't want her to have another surgery. The challenge I have is that she's gotten plump and needs to drop a couple pounds. Canin recently came out with a lower calorie version of her food, but so far it hasn't helped.

Good luck. My guess is that your dog will need to be on prescription food of some sort for the rest of her life.
 

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If she had just had an infection or a high pH, I could easily see trying a non-prescription food. But actual stones are a whole 'nother issue. I, personally, would not chance it. I don't think the ingredients in the diet are ideal, but that combination with pH altering additions are proven to reduce the potential of developing stones again. There are several food companies that make diets with similar properties to c/d-maybe one of them has an ingredient list you prefer. You can google Royal Canin Veterinary Diets, Purina Veterinary Diets, Iams Veterinary Diets, iVet Veterinary Diets, etc.
 
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I empathize with your situation.

The Purina Vet Diets would not be a step up form the Hill's IMO. I'm not sure about the other two brands; but unfortunately these companies use some of the lowest quality ingredients to create a very specific guaranteed analysis to help a specific problem. They could produce them with better ingredients, but then their profit margin would go down.

I know that if I were in your position I would find the least egregious "prescription" diet available and feed that while I investigated consulting with a vet (perhaps holistic) who has had further additional training in nutrition.

The Honest Kitchen dehydrated food has a number of formulas and their customer service staff is very open to talking with vets about special needs diets. All Natural Dog Food | Dehydrated Raw Dog Food | Like Homemade Pet Food

Here is a brief review by one satisfied customer:

Comments about Honest Kitchen Keen Dehydrated Dog Food:

I have a standard dachshund that has had bladder stone surgery 3 years ago. I searched & searched for a food, other than the prescription food, that I could feed him that didn't have ingredients with high oxalate. Believe me when I tell you that this food is AWESOME. Not only is it healthy enough for my 2nd dog, but has helped keep stones from formulating in 1st dog.
The change in their coats in 3 days time was absolutely AMAZING. I am a LONG time user and hope Honest Kitchen keeps making Keen!!!

Bottom Line Yes, I would recommend this to a friend
 
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