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Discussion Starter #1
We got our boys thinking we wouldn't want to breed them. And on our AKC Papers from the breeder they checked the limited-no breeding no showing box. But now we want to buy a girl and breed.
Can you change the no breeding once you get the paperwork from the breeder? I still need to enter it on the AKC website and pay.

Any ideas??
Should I call the breeder pay them the extra and hope they will change it?
 

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Old Gold is the Best Gold
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Well, you can call the breeder. A breeder can lift the limited registeration later if you meet her requirements (such as having your dogs' hips X rayed- lots of breeders lift it if the health clearances are done, or if the dog finishes its championship). I would call and ask. I am assuming you'd be doing clearances anyway? Your pups are adorable!
 

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If you purchased from a responsible breeder, there is probably a reason the Limited Registration box was checked. You can ask the breeder, but as ACC said, they may want to wait to lift the Limited-if they are willing to lift it at all- until the dogs have all clearances necessary-hips, elbows, hearts and eyes-and possibly have earned one or more titles.

As a breeder, if there is a dog I feel truly has potential for show/hunt tests/breeding, I keep it or place it with a friend. Pets are sold as non-breeding pets for a reason, often something minor enough that your typical pet owner is not going to notice but that as a breeder, I do not want to be responsible for perpetuating in the breed.

Also, truthfully, there is much more to responsible breeding than buying a bitch and breeding her to your own males. While serious breeders will do this sometimes, your very best breeders are always looking to improve and better what they have and chances of the best dog for your girl being one that you own, are slim. You have to have clearances on all involved as well as several generations of clearances on ancestors. You also need to know their pedigrees-what combinations have produced what issues/good things, in the past. This takes study and work. Every successful breeder I know had a mentor to help them through this process.

There are "pin money" breeders, who own the male and the bitch and just breed their own dogs to their own dogs over and over. They do meet a need, as long as they are doing all the clearances and keeping track of what they produce health wise. They are not however improving on what they have and moving forward to producing better dogs.
 

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Old Gold is the Best Gold
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I must say I have no problem with breeding non show dogs as long as everybody has a great temperament and has clearances- but IMO you should at a VERY minimum do basic clearances.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all for your fast replys I do agree on making sure you better the line and to research! research !research!...this is another reason i'm checking into this and asking questions. The breeder asked me if i wanted to breed them I said no. She gave me the option of buying them for a higher price to breed them.
Now that I have them I realize how special they are and i want to share that with other owners. Everyone comments on them. I have had around 12 people asking me to please have puppies they really want one.
I grew up raising bunnies(every kind)-cats(Persians)-dogs(westie's) and doing 4H Went to english horse back riding classes So loving animals has always been a passion for me.
It was a great childhood i would love to share with my kids.
I agree about all the tests I would of course do them!!
Most of them you cannot do until age 2 correct so I have sometime...we won't be breeding anytime soon :) So I can learn alot before then.
I would love to find out more info on how i can do this right are there books??

Thank you for all your help.
 

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Old Gold is the Best Gold
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I am delighted to hear you have that experience and would like to do the tests. Two is the standard age for hips. I think eyes can be done at one year, and generally are done annually. I don't know about heart testing- in my main breed (Whippets) it is usually done several times in the dogs' lifetime.

It sounds as thought she would give you full registration on the dogs if you paid. Perhaps keep in touch routinely and if they pass their clearances, ask her about doing it then.

Do you have a pedigree for them? You can start to research their history on K9DATA.COM Home Page and stuff, too :)
 

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ACC is correct-hips and elbows are generally done together at age 2, eyes are done by a veterinary opthamologist at one year and annually thereafter; hearts are done by a veterinary cardiologist and can be done as early as age 1 although I usually wait until they are close to two, and it is only required once. However, since I usually have new dogs coming up who need their heart clearance I'll grab another dog or two and take them in for a recheck. Even though it is not required, I also periodically run thyroid tests on the dogs I am breeding. I do the expensive test, as it is the only one which really gets at autoimmune thyroiditis.

I also won't breed dogs with allergies or who are susceptible to hot spots, as these problems can worsen with each generation.

There are some excellent books out there:

Dog Breeding Advice, Whelping Puppies, Weaning Puppies

I especially like Muriel Lee's book for whelping and rearing puppies.

There is a group called Dog Mentor on yahoo that is very good, but be prepared for some very pointed questions-these are people who take breeding seriously and have some strong opinions! But they are extremely helpful, very informative and can be very supportive as well.

http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/dogmentor/join
 

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Discussion Starter #12
ACC I wonder why it's broken up and if you can improve the pedigree

I still can't find the mom her name is Buddy's '69 Shelby Mustang
 

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OFA clearances are also generally on the 5 generation hip pedigree in k9data.

I agree with ACC, the top part of the pedigree is nice, bottom part looks like your basic backyard bred. I do tell people that if you were to take one of my conformation, healthy show dogs and breed to a typical BYB dog, the offspring will look very different from my dogs in just one generation, and will deviate more and more from my dogs "look", etc. with each successive generation. Health can degenerate just as quickly, if one goes into lines without clearances and with problems.
 

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Are you sure her name has numbers in it? AKC only very recently began allowing numbers as a part of a name.

At any rate, you can go to akc.org and purchase an online pedigree of her.
 

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Old Gold is the Best Gold
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Yes, you can purchase the ped. Many dogs are not listed in K9data, particularly if they are not show or field bred. I had to buy both my dogs' peds. They are big time BYB...

You can find mine easily- Windridge Starlite of My Life & Windridge Kiss My Brass
 

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It is not the best sign that someone will change the registration based only on how much you are willing to pay. Granted, some breedable pups are placed on limited registration because a proper home (read someone who will compete with the dog) can not be found for them, but that does not sound like it is the case in this situation.

I personally would not change the registration unless someone shows a willingness to compete with the dog. You can, by the way, compete in any AKC forum except confirmation with a dog on limited registration. Even if I were to change a registration, I certainly would not insist on more money from the owner. I would only do it because a dog exhibits some positive characteristic which I did not recognize as a puppy.

If you are interested in breeding, you should start with a puppy that is suited for that purpose, and work with an experienced breeder who is willing to mentor you.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yup i'm sure on the name have the AKC Reg paperwork giving to me by the breeder--- I just noticed the moms b-day 5-07 is that possible the boys are 15 weeks...she would have been a young mom(btch).
I was waiting on the Akc reg until I got the boys micro-chipped i want to make sure i have that recordered in the paperwork.
 

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Golden Luck O' The Irish
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No, you cannot change the AKC registration and your dog's breeder sold you a dog on a limited registration for good reason. My golden was also sold to me on limited AKC reg. as well, that is so she can control which dogs are bred; typically your high quality ethical breeders do this.

Breeding Your Golden Retriever

Breeding is not for beginners. It is as hard to do well as it is easy to do. Until you can satisfy the requirements that the serious hobby breeder should meet, as presented in the section of this booklet entitled Choosing A Reputable Breeder, you will be doing the breed an injustice if you have a litter of puppies.
CONSIDER YOUR MOTIVES

If you think that:
  1. HAVING PUPPIES WOULD BE FUN; it is also very time consuming and demanding. By four weeks of age a Golden litter of eight, twelve or possibly even fourteen puppies is active, dirty, noisy and potentially destructive. Illness or death of the dam or puppies can be expensive, emotional . . . and no fun at all.
  2. IT WOULD BE EDUCATIONAL FOR THE CHILDREN; so would a litter of hamsters. Bitches do not whelp at your convenience, and the children are often in school or in bed at the time of delivery. Care of the pregnant bitch, and properly raising and socializing puppies, is work for a responsible adult.
  3. IT WOULD HELP US GET BACK OUR INVESTMENT; you may find that the rate of return is very low. Stud fee, veterinary fees, advertising, and the daily care and feeding of a litter are very expensive. You may only be able to sell three or four puppies out of a litter of ten or twelve; even experienced breeders sometimes have difficulty selling puppies.
  4. IT WOULD HELP FULFILL THE DOG'S NEEDS; you are anthropomorphizing. While the instinct for procreation is strong, the dog has no conscious knowledge of what it is missing, no regrets and no guilt feelings. Spaying or neutering will remove the instinct and the problems often associated with it, such as wandering and marking. Pregnancy not only contributes nothing to a bitch's health, but sometimes causes problems. A spayed bitch cannot be accidentally bred, and will not be subject to the uterine infections common in older, intact females.
  5. IT WILL IMPROVE THE BITCH'S TEMPERAMENT IF SHE IS BRED; you are wrong. No animal whose temperament needs improving should be bred in the first place, since temperament is most often the result of hereditary factors. And while raising a litter will not only NOT make an improvement in the dam's temperament, it will also probably result in a litter of unsatisfactory puppies who have been imprinted by their unstable dam. There is also the possibility that the bitch will be an unsatisfactory mother, necessitating much more work on your part.
CONSIDER YOUR RESOURCES

Raising a litter is a demanding project. Do you:
  1. HAVE THE FACILITIES FOR WHELPING AND RAISING A LITTER PROPERLY? You need a warm, quiet, secure area, easily cleaned, for properly confining and caring for a litter of eight, ten or twelve fast-growing puppies while they are with their mother, and a similar, larger area for use after weaning.
  2. HAVE THE TIME TO DEVOTE TO THIS PROJECT? Time to take or send a bitch for breeding, sit up for hours during whelping, and hand-raise the litter if the bitch is unable to? Time to buy and prepare food, feed, and clean up four or five times daily? Time to go to the veterinarian for check-ups, inoculations, and with a sick dam or puppy? Time to scrub floors and pens, clean up feces and urine, and give medication? Time to individually socialize each puppy daily? Time to answer phone calls, talk with prospective buyers, and answer the same questions over and over again? Time for all the paperwork required, including typing accurate pedigrees, health records, care instructions, records of sales, and so on?
  3. HAVE THE MONEY TO PUT INTO THE PROJECT? Can you afford to pay the stud fee, inoculations and veterinary care for the bitch and puppies, as well as other expenses? What if the bitch has problems that necessitate a caesarean section? What if the puppies die? What if the bitch dies, or cannot raise the puppies? Can you afford to feed and provide veterinary care for two or three four-month-old puppies that didn't sell? Can you afford to refund the purchase price on a puppy that proves to be unsound or unsuitable?
CONSIDER YOUR DOG'S QUALITY

Is your dog truly an outstanding representative of the breed? Pretty, friendly and smart is not nearly enough.
  1. TEMPERAMENT. Your dog must be absolutely sound and stable, with a personality and disposition appropriate for the breed. Shyness, aggressiveness, gunshyness, lack of retrieving ability or trainability, and hyperactivity are all reasons not to breed, regardless of other problems.
  2. BREED TYPE AND QUALITY. Your dog must be structurally and functionally sound, with conformation characteristics appropriate for the breed. An experienced, knowledgeable exhibitor/breeder can assist in the evaluation of your dog's adherence to the Breed Standard.
  3. SOUNDNESS. Your dog should be tested free of certain genetic defects, as should the proposed mate. Knowledge of the status of parents, grandparents, siblings, etc. with regard to genetic testing is also desirable. HIPS should be properly X-rayed, and the X-rays submitted to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals or PennHIP to be read as free of hip dysplasia. HEARTS should be examined by a board-certified cardiologist. EYES should be examined annually by a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist and be free of hereditary cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, and any other eye anomaly. ELBOWS should be properly X-rayed and the X-rays submitted to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals or a board-certified veterinary radiologist, to be read as free of elbow dysplasia.

    Any inheritable defects, including but not limited to retained testicles, overshot or undershot jaw, congenital heart defects, recurrent skin problems, thyroid deficiency, immunological problems, orthopedic problems and recurrent seizures or epilepsy occurring in either parent are all reasons not to breed, regardless of other qualities.
  4. PEDIGREE. A four or five generation pedigree on the proposed litter should be read and interpreted by a person with extensive knowledge of the breed and of the dogs involved. Titles alone are no guarantee of genetic value.
  5. HEALTH. A breeding animal must be fully mature, in the prime of health, and in lean muscular condition. All inoculations should be up to date, and the animal should be free of both internal and external parasites. Acquired problems such as narrow birth canal from previous injury, canine brucellosis, transmissible venereal tumor, anemia, any disease or infection of the reproductive organs, concurrent diseases of other organ systems, or any contagious diseases are all reasons not to breed.
CONSIDERATIONS OF THE STUD DOG OWNER

If you are thinking of using your male at stud, you are no less responsible for the quality of the litter than the owner of the brood bitch. You have the obligation of thoroughly screening every owner that inquires for stud service and the bitch to be bred; of traveling to and from the airport to pick up and return bitches sent in for breeding; of boarding and caring for bitches that are sent to you; of carrying out the breeding; of supplying pedigrees, photos, and examination reports; and of keeping meticulous records. This is all done as circumstances dictate, and not at your convenience; the weekend away you had planned may well be spent at home looking after a visiting bitch instead.
CONSIDER THE CURRENT DOG POPULATION

If, at this point, you are still considering breeding your dog, VISIT the dog pound, Humane Society or animal shelter in the city nearest you. Ask how many dogs are euthanized monthly, and how many euthanized in the last month were Golden Retrievers.
 

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I must say,they are gorgeous and the breeder,obviously, thought so,too cos she offered you,a breeding status when you baught them.
If I were you,i would call the breeder and ask her if she would agree to change the papers when they will pass their health clearances.Are you thinking of showing them,either for conformation or work?.
 

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What is the mother's birth date? It can't be 5/07-she would just be a newborn herself :)

In order for her to have all of her clearances, she would have to have been born over 2 years ago. Did the breeder give you copies of clearances on both parents?
 
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