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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)

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That's a very good article. Raises some very good questions to ask yourself. It made me sad to read. I was asking myself those questions just about exactly four years ago. I hope I don't need to think about them for at least another 10 - or more.
 

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This is a good resource yet very hard to read and think about. Is it possible this can be made a sticky so those who need it can find it easily?
 

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This is a good resource yet very hard to read and think about. Is it possible this can be made a sticky so those who need it can find it easily?
I don't know how to make a sticky- but other than the coat, I did find it quite useful. We humans, want our precious dogs to stay forever and this made it very clear to my friend today, for which I am grateful. Just watching her, and leaving out the coat, I got her a 42. My friend put her at a 48. She counted the coat. She was PTS at noon - a very teary day around here.
 

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This is such a good resource to help those who are facing the hard reality we all eventually face.

Over the past 42 years of having pets and eventually having to face this very hard reality and decision, I have found that we often have trouble separating our thoughts and feelings from what we want and focusing solely on what is best for our pet. For me, and my family, we have found that if we just focus on what is best for our pet, and leave our feelings out of the decision, it makes facing this hard decision just a little bit easier, though it's never easy...

Sadly, we learned this lesson the hard way. We had a Beagle, Barney that developed cancer at age 15. Our vet encouraged us to have the cancerous tumor removed. Barney recovered quickly from the procedure. Then the tumor came back. Our vet encouraged us to again have the tumor removed, so we did, and once again, Barney recovered quickly. Remember now, this was a 15-year-old Beagle that we loved so dearly. We so wanted Barney to get better and live longer. Within a few months, the tumor returned again, only this time we made the decision to think solely about Barney. He was now 16 years old. He had given us so many wonderful years and so many great memories. Barney had lived a loving wonderful life for 16 years.

When we quit thinking about ourselves and what we wanted, we began thinking about what was best for Barney. Would he really want to go through a third surgery only to more than likely have the tumor return? It became clear to us then that putting Barney through another surgery wasn't the best decision for Barney, so as sad as we were, we focused on Barney and made the decision to end his suffering.

I'll never forget how this lil ole Beagle went to sleep on my lap. I felt all the quivering and the tenseness in his body give way to a blissful sleep from the sedative the vet provided. The vet gave me time to be with Barney until I was ready to say goodbye to our dear family friend. Once the medication was administered to stop his heart, Barney's suffering was over. I realized then that this was the most caring and loving thing I could have ever done for my dog... Yeah, I cried my eyes out, but in time the tears and pain eased and life continued.

I swore then that I would never again think about us when faced with having to make this difficult decision. Sadly we have had to go through this same process more times than I would have wanted. I've learned from past history that this is the hard part of having pets. They never do live as long as we would like, but oh how wonderful they are to have in our lives for the time we're given with them.

I hope this may help someone facing this hard decision going forward.

Rest in Peace, Barney. Thank you for sharing your life with us.
 

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This is such a good resource to help those who are facing the hard reality we all eventually face.

Over the past 42 years of having pets and eventually having to face this very hard reality and decision, I have found that we often have trouble separating our thoughts and feelings from what we want and focusing solely on what is best for our pet. For me, and my family, we have found that if we just focus on what is best for our pet, and leave our feelings out of the decision, it makes facing this hard decision just a little bit easier, though it's never easy...

Sadly, we learned this lesson the hard way. We had a Beagle, Barney that developed cancer at age 15. Our vet encouraged us to have the cancerous tumor removed. Barney recovered quickly from the procedure. Then the tumor came back. Our vet encouraged us to again have the tumor removed, so we did, and once again, Barney recovered quickly. Remember now, this was a 15-year-old Beagle that we loved so dearly. We so wanted Barney to get better and live longer. Within a few months, the tumor returned again, only this time we made the decision to think solely about Barney. He was now 16 years old. He had given us so many wonderful years and so many great memories. Barney had lived a loving wonderful life for 16 years.

When we quit thinking about ourselves and what we wanted, we began thinking about what was best for Barney. Would he really want to go through a third surgery only to more than likely have the tumor return? It became clear to us then that putting Barney through another surgery wasn't the best decision for Barney, so as sad as we were, we focused on Barney and made the decision to end his suffering.

I'll never forget how this lil ole Beagle went to sleep on my lap. I felt all the quivering and the tenseness in his body give way to a blissful sleep from the sedative the vet provided. The vet gave me time to be with Barney until I was ready to say goodbye to our dear family friend. Once the medication was administered to stop his heart, Barney's suffering was over. I realized then that this was the most caring and loving thing I could have ever done for my dog... Yeah, I cried my eyes out, but in time the tears and pain eased and life continued.

I swore then that I would never again think about us when faced with having to make this difficult decision. Sadly we have had to go through this same process more times than I would have wanted. I've learned from past history that this is the hard part of having pets. They never do live as long as we would like, but oh how wonderful they are to have in our lives for the time we're given with them.

I hope this may help someone facing this hard decision going forward.

Rest in Peace, Barney. Thank you for sharing your life with us.
I have a Barney who just turned 2 years old in January. I hope I can do the right thing when the time comes as bravely as you have for your Barney.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
http://vet.osu.edu/assets/pdf/hospital/companionAnimals/HonoringtheBond/HowDoIKnowWhen.pdf

Having to counsel someone today- this is very interesting and mostly I agree with the point scales, though with a Golden- the 5 points for good coat are a gimme...
feeling sad.
Disturbs that this is so hard to find now... I tried two links and no -go, page not found. So I wrote to the ECC person @ OSU and asked him to get this page back up where it is easily found again. I dk if the original link is do-able or not but hope to hear soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)

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When our last golden Thor was ill, I used a similar scale. It was very helpful. Even with giving him the benefit of the doubt and a better score when something was ambiguous, I was able to chart a definite decline over a period of time. It helped me see what I didn't necessarily want to see.
 

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When Bear turned 10 we stared looking at the life quality we wonted him to have and how to keep him happy.My wife and I both know that he would be miserable if he was ever unable to move or be active,and that we would properly have him put to sleep.Luckily this never happened and Bear was active till the day he died, I remember playing fetch with him on evening he passed, he went in his sleep at about 3 in the morning.He was 13.
Hopefully when its Lilly's time we will be clear headed and able to make the right decision for her, but it's always a rough topic.
 

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My Irish Setter, Boots was 12 yrs 3 months when diaingnosed with very aggressive bon cancer in his knee. We had 3 choices. 1. Amputate that day. 2. Bring him home the few days until he stopped eating or getting up and nth bring him back in to be sent to the Bridge. 3 Do nothing and just let him die on his own. My vet knew I would never accept #3. Our hearts told us to amputate but I minds told us he was 12, he had arthritis really bad in his hips, and there was no way of knowing if it had already spread. He could be put thru that surgery only to have the cancer flare up elsewhere. We opted for #2. However that "few days" turned into exactly 10 weeks. I took him fishing every day and he swam, tormented crabs in shallow water, got after shore birds. I stopped by the vet 2-3 tims a week and he would shake his head and say "I don't understand it, but we do not have to do it yet." I fed him no-no food tht he loved--made him the same dessert we had every night be it strawberry shortcake, banana split, pie & ice cream, cake. He loved fruits and veggies and he had his own letttuce and tomato salad almost every night, melon, etc. But the day came he was no so active and the nexty day he fell and couldn't get up. I made the decision to let him go that day. He had enjoyed life to the last day. I have never regretted it. This was in 1997


Our golden retriever Sophie was fine one day, unable to get up the next--hemangiosarcoma. There was no having to think Nothing could be done for her. This was in '16. Same with our Great Pyrenees, Shaggy in '14. Fine one day, down the next morning. No decision to have to be made.

Our Pyrenees Sir Moose was diagnosed with liver disease and given 6 months tops. He rfused the hepatic food, and I cooked for him and we had him 23 months. Then he refused to eat suppr, and breakfast the next morning and I knew it was time. Up until then he was eating twice a day and wanting his daily walk and lots of pets and bushings. This was last Dec. Our golden girl Honey had lymphoma and sh let us know when it was time. Most I did not have to make the ral decision, was taken out of my hands. It is alwasy so hard, but we do it becaue w love oru dogs so much and do not want them to suffer.




It is hard to mak th
 
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