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My little Obie is 11 weeks old and he is doing great in his crate and learned several manners. We go on walks twice a day and he fetches at least once a day with play sprinkled throughout
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. There are times though when he does bite. I’d like to sit on the couch with him, and up and until a week ago I was able to ask him to lay down and play with his toy while on his couch - now he just wants to nip at me. Also I know he is wanting my attention at times by grabbing my pants legs and ankles. We made progress yesterday and he licked me several times while I was petting him. I have two people that help me walk him and his biting is way less with them. He is also very lovable and likes to lick new people but hasn’t shown that affectionate toward me. I know I’ve been concerned with helping him learn manners, but I’ve also loved on him too up until recently when it’s harder to distract him with a toy. Any advice would be helpful. I’ve had a golden before but he was 18months when I got him.
 

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He’s adorable! It’s completely normal. My 10 week old is getting better. My hands and ear lobes paid the price early on. I do screech, loudly. It works. I’m also using my voice and praising non biting behavior. When she goes for my hands I pull them away. I’ll also put a chew toy in her mouth when she wants to chew on me. It’s much better than 1 week ago. With my girl physical corrections just rev her up more. Patience, consistency and time will make it better. The marks on my hand are a week old except one. It’s also worse when she’s tired. Good luck!
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One other thing that‘s really helped. I taught her the drop command while playing tug with her. It translates to my fingers. I taught it by sticking a finger in her mouth telling her drop. It took a bunch of repetitions. As soon as she drops she gets a piece of kibble or I immediately toss her toy for a retrieve.
 

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Thank you both. I am thankful he sweet to strangers. Literally licks them to death but I’m going to incorporate more training sessions through play.
 

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My input:
1. He is young and normal
2. He bites? Don't let him.
3. Give feedback that it hurts when he does bite.
4. At some point when he is a little older you may have to stop being nice about it. Google for some ideas.

To be honest with you I never have this problem and take a no nonsense approach if this lingers.
 

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Hudson is now 6 months and I have seen results today of consequences for unacceptable behavior. Mostly, she is fantastic and such a good girl today and I feel it is because we established boundaries with being a strong alpha/leader when I feel she needed it. The consequence I would give her was mostly a louder than normal voice and harsh tone of "NO". Also, I would stiffen my fingers and poke her side of neck firmly. I have learned that the right alpha attitude with the physical act of imitating a larger dogs mouth with my stiffened fingers alwyas set her straight.
Watch dogs play especially when a puppy gets too over zealous with a mature dog. That mature dog almost always sets that pup straight by setting a boundary and it always includes a sort of rough physical action. Not a bite or tear but a sort of "punch" with their snout that is a bit serious.
Sometimes when I play with her I let it get rough on purpose. I even lay on the floor and nuzzle her with my face and mouth right near her mouth. She gets tempted to nip and I use a softer but firm "NO" and many time I bite her neck and face....lightly. Some of you may have done this and saw the reaction. Hudson immediately stops whatever she is doing and looks at me. I look into her eyes for a second or two and get back into play and them de-escalate and make sure we end with fun, always. I have gotten bit a little but nothing terrible, and no blood. One time she grabbed my lip but I was firm and strong and she never clamped down....It may sound strange but I know we have bonded even deeper since I've done these things.
This may not work for all pups and owners but a version of it especially with firmness and a physical action with an alpha attitude, I feel, will always get a good result.
Good luck!
 

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We tried yelping and found that he often wouldn't respond or would get excited and bite even more. If yelping didn't work, we'd end whatever we were doing. (e.g. tug toy goes away, we leave his x-pen or whatever room we're in) In 10-30 seconds we'd try again, and repeat the process. It's a test of patience, but it worked.

Obie is very cute and it sounds like you're doing a great job with him. That strong bond will come together, and he'll get snugglier. For us, I noticed it coming through after teething.
 

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Hudson is now 6 months and I have seen results today of consequences for unacceptable behavior. Mostly, she is fantastic and such a good girl today and I feel it is because we established boundaries with being a strong alpha/leader when I feel she needed it. The consequence I would give her was mostly a louder than normal voice and harsh tone of "NO". Also, I would stiffen my fingers and poke her side of neck firmly. I have learned that the right alpha attitude with the physical act of imitating a larger dogs mouth with my stiffened fingers alwyas set her straight.
Watch dogs play especially when a puppy gets too over zealous with a mature dog. That mature dog almost always sets that pup straight by setting a boundary and it always includes a sort of rough physical action. Not a bite or tear but a sort of "punch" with their snout that is a bit serious.
Sometimes when I play with her I let it get rough on purpose. I even lay on the floor and nuzzle her with my face and mouth right near her mouth. She gets tempted to nip and I use a softer but firm "NO" and many time I bite her neck and face....lightly. Some of you may have done this and saw the reaction. Hudson immediately stops whatever she is doing and looks at me. I look into her eyes for a second or two and get back into play and them de-escalate and make sure we end with fun, always. I have gotten bit a little but nothing terrible, and no blood. One time she grabbed my lip but I was firm and strong and she never clamped down....It may sound strange but I know we have bonded even deeper since I've done these things.
This may not work for all pups and owners but a version of it especially with firmness and a physical action with an alpha attitude, I feel, will always get a good result.
Good luck!
I would strongly discourage people from using these methods to train a puppy. They are based on the "alpha dog" theory that has been debunked as flawed, and can actually damage your relationship with your pup. You are a human, not a dog. The whole point of training is to teach the pup to function well in the human world. If you behave like a dog, it is not only going to confuse your pup (who knows very well that you aren't a dog), it is also likely to make her not trust you in the long term. If you need to resort to biting your puppy's neck and face in order to establish your position as her leader, you're going about things in completely the wrong way. My dogs eat before me, they go out of doors before me, they sleep on my bed and on my couch, they play tug with me, and so on. But they are in no doubt whatsoever that I am the big cheese in the house, and that I lead and they follow. And for the record, I have never bitten a dog in my life.

Sure, jabbing a puppy with your fingers will "set her straight", but it will also set you up for problems later. And biting her face will indeed generate a reaction. But it will not teach her how to behave with humans.

Instead, teach some basic behaviours: sit, down, stand, stay, come, leave it, drop it, etc. Then use a system where you teach her to give these behaviours instead of the behaviours you don't want. I say "ah-ah" to signal behaviour I don't like, and I follow it up with a command my dog has learned. For example, the dog jumps up at someone: "ah-ah, sit". This signals to the dog that I don't like him jumping up, and that I want him to sit instead. Or the dog grabs something he shouldn't have (e.g. a shoe): "ah-ah, drop it". Or the dog begs food at the table: "ah-ah, go to your bed". If you're consistent, the dog will look to you for instructions every time she hears "ah-ah". The problem with jabbing the dog and saying "no" is that the dog does not understand why you are hurting her because you haven't shown her what you want her to do instead. So all you've done is to punish her physically for behaviour that is normal for a dog. And that is why she will end up not trusting you.

I'm with gdgli on this. I've had multiple puppies over the years and biting has always been easy to deal with (a) by not allowing it to happen (time-outs in the crate, training sessions if the pup becomes over-excited, giving an alternative command once basic behaviour has been taught), (b) by signalling that it hurts if it does happen, and (c) by teaching bite inhibition.
 

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Thank you for your shared perspective ceegee. I should have quantified the bite and poke training I use. It is minimal and in 6 months I've used poking times when I redirect and set a new command and the bite thing happened twice...and only because we were nuzzling and floor horse playing. I shared it due to seeing a real reaction that surely corrected the bite I didn't want from her. It felt right at the time but your perspective will enhance my future approach so thanks. I did indeed see a reaction from her that at the least interrupted her train of thought. And, I never alpha up a lot but I have seen enough research and personal experience to see good results with appropriate use of displaying checking her with a language she understands. To each his own ways. There are ways to good relationships and always a need to experiment with the "personality" of the dog in my opinion. I've trained a few pups but never a Golden. She happens to be a real joy and continue to learn from ceegee and others here....many thanks.
 

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A good loud OW worked great for me..Mine is almost 10 months old now and is very aware of human frailties, (cost a little of my own blood too) compared to her playing with my others..As far as biting goes..NOTHING at all (it also helped when those lil vampire teeth were gone) ..as far as being sassy goes..still work in progress🤣
 

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My input:
1. He is young and normal
2. He bites? Don't let him.
3. Give feedback that it hurts when he does bite.
4. At some point when he is a little older you may have to stop being nice about it. Google for some ideas.

To be honest with you I never have this problem and take a no nonsense approach if this lingers.
Thank you!
 

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Logan is already slowing down with the puppy nips. He's not really nipping me anymore much at all, but visitors who come over seem to think it's appropriate to stick their hands in his mouth for chewing/nipping.

I just make a noise when he does it and redirect him to a toy. It isn't mean or even loud -- its just kind of an exclamation of "oh!" and I pull my hand away. He seems to have gotten the message with me. He didn't nip at the vet today either.
 

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Fletch was sharky esp when tired (or for some reason, on the sofa?!) we all made sure to love on him like crazy when he was really sleepy — touch his ears and feet and belly. Now he is a 70lb cuddle bug. I remember the day he lost his last baby tooth it was like a switch turned off and the nipping almost ceased! They like to play bite coupled with teething pain they need to relieve and I’m sure our hands and arms provide just that right amount of relief :) I’ve always let my dogs mouth my hands when they are calm and train them the pressure they are allowed to use. This is my first golden and while he was a mouthy pup, he is definitely the most gentle when mouthing he has such control. (My terrier on the other hand, ouch!!)
 

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Update:
Since Sunday, I’ve been working on more petting sessions when he is calm then also removing myself from the room where he begins to nip or bite. Yesterday and today, I have seen drastic improvement. The loud noise or shriek only excited him more.

Now the next behavior is getting him to come back inside after a walk or potty break. My big fella LOVES it out there.
Thank you all for you input.
 

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Ours is completely the same and it's normal from everything I've been told. He'd rather bite our hands or feet than play with any toys! But with constant redirection, praise for good behavior, yelling "ow" loudly, teaching him "no" and "drop it", he's getting better. 4 months old. The vet said because he's in the midst of teething, it gets worse before it gets better. We've suffered plenty of cuts!!
 

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So far, she really isn’t landsharking me. She’s 10.5 weeks. But she has a 19 month old golden who allows her to be her pincushion. But a trainer did say last week at 9.5 weeks she has really good bite inhibition probably because of my other dog.
 

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So far, she really isn’t landsharking me. She’s 10.5 weeks. But she has a 19 month old golden who allows her to be her pincushion. But a trainer did say last week at 9.5 weeks she has really good bite inhibition probably because of my other dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The little fella finally made his way sweetly to the couch and ottoman last night. Thank you all again!
 
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