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Hi Everyone
I am new on this forum, and I have an 8 month old Golden named Indy. Very beautiful girl.
Last week I took her to the vet as she had developed a hot spot.
The vet prescribed her antibiotics, cortisone cream and medicated baths. She also recommended I switch her from Frontline to Comfortis.
Her first dose of Comfortis was a week ago.

Fast forward to yesterday, and I notice she is losing fur around her eyes and right paw and she was quite itchy. So back down the vet we go to have some skin scrapings done and my suspicions were confirmed: demodex mites.

We discussed treatment, and it was agreed Indy would start with weekly injections of medication for at least 6 weeks.
I then asked if the medication can be used in conjunction with Comfortis and apparently there is a risk of neurological side effects.

Now my 2 options are:

1. Commence treatment for the mites with that risk of side effects

2. Wait 3 weeks for the Comfortis to be mostly out of her system and commence treatment for mites.

My concern is that the mites issue can become worse while we wait.

I just want what is best for her, but I am stuck on what I should do. :confused:

Would appreciate any help / advice / stories of your experience with these horror mites.
 

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Grumpy Old Man
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Demodex mites are part of the normal flora and fauna found on all dogs. In the case of localized demodectic mange, the bare and thin spots appear when the dogs immune system becomes depressed and the mites get out of control.

The real question you need to answer is why the immune system is depressed? Address that and the dogs natural defenses will get the mites under control again.

It is fairly common for a females immune system to go through some fluctuation as she goes through puberty (her first cycle). This combined with the hot spot and flea meds could drag her immune system down far enough to allow the mites to reproduce out of control.

In many cases of localized demodectic mange, rest and proper diet is about all that is needed for the problem to resolve itself.
 

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My collie got demodex at the same age and I decided not to treat it. He had a couple of small spots and the vet wanted to dip him and even shave him. That seemed worse than the demodex. Fortunately, it never spread beyond a couple of spots on his face. It cleared up pretty quickly and he was left with a few white hairs.
 
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