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Is it a defense mechanism? I think their bodies are learning what is food and what needs to be puked out. Our puppy was always allowed to chew on whatever she found in the woods. She'd eat leaves, napkins, paper, branches, etc. I am thinking that was just nature, teaching puppy's stomach.

My sister, on the other hand, watches her dog like a hawk. "is that a leaf you are eating???!!!, dont put that in your mouth!!! dont chew on that stick, you will die!!!". One day, the dog did get very sick from eating something she was not supposed to. Our dog just pukes stuff out. Just this morning she puked out a pretty chunky piece of bone bigger than a square inch. One time she puked out a plastic wrapper with an staple in it! I like to think her stomach has been conditioned to handle it. Same rule applies to people, if you are a super clean person, the tiniest germ can hurt you, but if you are used to it, your body can fight it.

Whatcha guys think? Is there any truth to this theory, or am I just asking for trouble?
 

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I should not even respond to this, seems to be such a no brainer in my book, my opinion: YOU ARE ASKING FOR TROUBLE!
 

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Layla and Bauer's Mommy
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I personally wouldn't risk it. With a piece of bone that large, you worry not only about choking but also an obstruction in the stomach/intestines which leads to a mighty expensive surgery. I watch mine like a hawk when they're gnawing on bones just because of this reason. With sticks, they can splinter and scrape the esophagus/stomach on the way down, so I don't let mine chew sticks. It's not just about their stomachs being strong/more acidic than ours, it's about the obstructions and damage things like that can do in their bodies. So yea, I'd say that's a road of trouble.. I'd watch what she ingests.
 

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That kind of reminds me of the guy I saw on TV who ate glass lightbulbs. He said that his body has been conditioned to deal with the glass over the years, and we shouldn't try it at home.

I also think you are asking for trouble! I wouldn't go to the extreme of chasing my dog around and ripping things out of her mouth, but there is a happy medium somewhere.
 

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Well just having to help on a surgery on an 12 yr old pug who had to have exploratory surgery because he ate some stuff (not sure exactly what, hard plastic pieces were pulled out of his stomach) I say you are asking for trouble. We had one client who had 2 labs have to have foreign bodies removed a month apart. Just because they are bigger doesn't mean that things can't get stuck! We had a husky also came in that had eaten big rocks..for the third time in his life.

If you can keep it away from your pup please.. Accidents do happen but bones like that can cause problems. A leaf no..ther is a fine line though..
 

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Nugget has "inquisitive" eating habits but I am very proactive about what I make him spit out on the spot. A leaf - OK (he's avoided the Oleander hedge). A rock, cactus, stick, NOT OK. No bones, period.

Our dogs depend on us to take good care of them and for me that includes being the food police. It only takes one "oooooooops" to require life-saving surgery.
 

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My friend's dog (Bernese Mountain Dog) ate a light bulb and it cost $$$$ to "fix" it. Broken glass, wires, chunks of metal..... apparently not the best thing for her digestion.
 

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Apollo & Knightley's mum!
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I usually take the middle ground on this, but my pup got very sick recently with a stomach infection which took two rounds of antiobiotics to fix... because of something he ate. So since then I have focused a little more on our "leave it" cue while on walks, and out and about.... because I don't want to ever see him again like that if I can help it.

I think you are asking for trouble personally.
 

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I also think you are asking for trouble. My Toby is notorious for some eating indiscretions, which resulted in vet trips, diagnostic tests, and extreme discomfort for him. We have experienced worry and heartache. He's 8 years old and we still must be careful with what we keep on our counter tops.
 

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In the Moment
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I agree with so many who have said what you're allowing can be very dangerous for your dog. There are many threads here about dogs with obstructions needing surgery.. most survive but some do not. There are many toxic substances dogs can ingest..... fatal mushrooms, antifreeze, etc. Puppies, just like human babies, explore the environment by putting things in their mouth. Much of this should not be eaten! Your pup needs you to teach him by not allowing him to ingest that which should not be eaten. Also, a very important command that needs to be learned is "drop it" or "leave it". You are your dog's protector and advocate.... please rethink. Your dog's life could depend on it.
 

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Jackson loves to find stuff and eat it, especially tissues, napkins, ect. Last week he found a dryer sheet and ate that. He ended up getting a tablespoon of peroxide and threw it up. Didn't help the behavior tho.

Bob
 

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Maggie is also one who is on the 12 step program for her affection for socks. At 2 years old, she is getting much, much better. She still likes the toilet paper and paper towels though and when she poops, sometimes I have to help pull out the little bit of toilet paper from her butt. I tried telling her toilet paper is for external use only. But seriously, it really is your responsibility to make your home safe for your dog, this includes supervising your dog as well.
 
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