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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was raised on training a dog via the slip lead/choke collar and I'm only now reading about prong collars.

Back then - I think it was used on pitbulls? - but now they are all the rage.

This looks far more precarious (sharp links). Can someone more knowledgeable educate me?

Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I was raised on training a dog via the slip lead/choke collar and I'm only now reading about prong collars.

Back then - I think it was used on pitbulls? - but now they are all the rage.

This looks far more precarious (sharp links). Can someone more knowledgeable educate me?

Thank you.
Edit to add I read the German study but if used correctly - how is a slip lead worse?
 

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Edit to add I read the German study but if used correctly - how is a slip lead worse?
We use a prong and a slip lead. To give an example of how a slip lead could be detrimental: we went to a dog show on a slip, just to walk around. I couldn’t get good control and after the show our dog had blisters around his neck from pulling on the slip. On the prong, with proper placement, he never gets to pull like that and it is much easier to correct him if he starts to get excited.
Our dog looks forward to wearing the prong and the slip, but I use the slip when I’m more confident and then transition to a flat collar.
Our training has been a work in progress so take everything with a grain of salt :)
 

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I use both chains and prongs, but for different things. One is not worse than the other and they can both be used improperly.

Chains I use for conformation. The prong I use for obedience. This is what mine looks like:
883522


As you can see, the tips aren’t sharp, they are blunt and rounded. It took me a minute to get my dog to stop jumping up for the collar when I was trying to take this picture. 😂

Both types can be good tools when used properly. I do not use either one for just walking around the neighborhood. I use 6-ft nylon slip leads for that. Chains and prongs are for working only.

ETA: I trained Eevee to walk on a leash with a 4-ft nylon slip lead. She was never allowed more leash than she deserved and I do not have the leash walking issues with her that I do with my older dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We use a prong and a slip lead. To give an example of how a slip lead could be detrimental: we went to a dog show on a slip, just to walk around. I couldn’t get good control and after the show our dog had blisters around his neck from pulling on the slip. On the prong, with proper placement, he never gets to pull like that and it is much easier to correct him if he starts to get excited.
Our dog looks forward to wearing the prong and the slip, but I use the slip when I’m more confident and then transition to a flat collar.
Our training has been a work in progress so take everything with a grain of salt :)
Thanks for the insight. I keep reading about "prong placement." I have a very wiggly pup - when he's excited. I imagine I would have to adjust continously?
 

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Thanks for the insight. I keep reading about "prong placement." I have a very wiggly pup - when he's excited. I imagine I would have to adjust continously?
Prong collars should actually be pretty tight. They should not be loose when relaxed like a chain collar is. That’s so they don’t fall down. Both types of collars should be placed high up under the chin and right behind the ears, they shouldn’t be down around the neck. Same with martingale collars and nylon slip leads - always up under the chin and behind the ears.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I use both chains and prongs, but for different things. One is not worse than the other and they can both be used improperly.

Chains I use for conformation. The prong I use for obedience. This is what mine looks like: View attachment 883522

As you can see, the tips aren’t sharp, they are blunt and rounded. It took me a minute to get my dog to stop jumping up for the collar when I was trying to take this picture. 😂

Both types can be good tools when used properly. I do not use either one for just walking around the neighborhood. I use 6-ft nylon slip leads for that. Chains and prongs are for working only.

ETA: I trained Eevee to walk on a leash with a 4-ft nylon slip lead. She was never allowed more leash than she deserved and I do not have the leash walking issues with her that I do with my older dog.
Ok! So at least your dog doesn't mind it! I don't know why the tips look scary to me!

Ya. My pup seems to walk fine on a nylon slip lead-seems calm but i guess was concerned when he sees something exciting-it would be nice to rely on some sort of "correction" and was curious about prongs.

By working - what do you mean exactly? Sorry noob question.
 

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Thanks for the insight. I keep reading about "prong placement." I have a very wiggly pup - when he's excited. I imagine I would have to adjust continously?
I find that sometimes find that Felix’s slips to midneck and I get some fur breakage but mid neck isn’t wrong. It’s a milder correction. If I’m going to a high traffic area I adjust it back up to behind his ears.
 

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Ok! So at least your dog doesn't mind it! I don't know why the tips look scary to me!

Ya. My pup seems to walk fine on a nylon slip lead-seems calm but i guess was concerned when he sees something exciting-it would be nice to rely on some sort of "correction" and was curious about prongs.

By working - what do you mean exactly? Sorry noob question.
Don’t be sorry! I mean actively training or showing.
I will add that my other dog wears a prong when on walks sometimes because his leash manners are terrible - even though he’s a Rally Master dog. 😅

ETA: She likes it because she's collar conditioned. Also, my dogs don't wear collars in the house. The only time they wear collars or slip leads is if we are training, showing, or going somewhere, so they get excited for any collar I might get out. LOL

I think one of the biggest issues in leash training is that everyone wants their dog on a long loose leash. I want my dog more or less in heel position most of the time when walking. I don’t necessarily want her actively heeling, but I want her close. I only give her enough leash to be generally in heel position. The only reason I even use a 6-ft leash is for when she needs to potty. And for stays in Obedience. Otherwise I prefer 3-4 ft leads. It’s safer and gives you more control. It’s a lot easier to correct a dog on a nylon slip lead if they are right next to you instead of out in front of you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Don’t be sorry! I mean actively training or showing.
I will add that my other dog wears a prong when on walks sometimes because his leash manners are terrible - even though he’s a Rally Master dog. 😅

I think one of the biggest issues in leash training is that everyone wants their dog on a long loose leash. I want my dog more or less in heel position most of the time when walking. I don’t necessarily want her actively heeling, but I want her close. I only give her enough leash to be generally in heel position. The only reason I even use a 6-ft leash is for when she needs to potty. And for stays in Obedience. Otherwise I prefer 3-4 ft leads. It’s safer and gives you more control. It’s a lot easier to correct a dog on a nylon slip lead if they are right next to you instead of out in front of you.
Ah ! Gotcha! I only do a slip lead in controlled environments/no distractions. Is the prong's function similar to the martingale?

There are so many options - my head's about to explode. LOL
 

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Ah ! Gotcha! I only do a slip lead in controlled environments/no distractions. Is the prong's function similar to the martingale?

There are so many options - my head's about to explode. LOL
The tightening action is the same for a prong and a martingale, but the prong does give a harsher correction. What is your goal? What are you wanting to train with a prong/martingale/slip lead/chain?
 
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Prong collars should actually be pretty tight. They should not be loose when relaxed like a chain collar is. That’s so they don’t fall down. Both types of collars should be placed high up under the chin and right behind the ears, they shouldn’t be down around the neck. Same with martingale collars and nylon slip leads - always up under the chin and behind the ears.
This is where I point out that Petsmart is selling quick release prong collars (basically same concept as a choke chain. 🤷‍♂️
 

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This is where I point out that Petsmart is selling quick release prong collars (basically same concept as a choke chain. 🤷‍♂️
WHHHYYYYYY?!?!?!?

For everyone that reads this thread: get your prong collars from Training Treasures! Do not buy them from Petsmart or other major retailer (unless it’s a Herm Sprenger) and no quick release!
 
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I think most trainers have all 3 in their training bags. Or more actually...

I have to buy a new training bag (ie - diaper bag from Target or Meijer) and perhaps when that happens, I'll line up all the training collars I have in there and add the 2 from my ringside bag (conformation). I'd do it now, but I'm still afraid of what all is in my training bag since it sat on the floor in my garage for over a year (I don't use most of the stuff in there at home, only for classes). I did go back to classes this week and it was a little uncomfortable digging in there for dumbbells, forget about the collars in there that I don't use often. :D

For most daily training with my guys - they are off leash and I'm not relying on a leash or collar to maintain control.

Training in class, depending on what the class is for - I will put a choke chain (obedience) or "snake chain" (conformation) on my dog. The snake chain for conformation (thin/fine) is placed right behind my dog's ears and under his jaw and locked so it doesn't slip down - before I move with him. With the choke chain (bigger chain than the one for conformation) - I suppose technically speaking, it is supposed to be put on and used the same as I described above, but I let the chain hang loose around my dog's necks. If correcting, it's just a "chain rattle" - it's not a choke.

Prongs - I have one for training (actually need to find a link before I use with my middle dog, if I do). It's used in controlled situations where I want really primed heeling work with my dog and I can give very subtle corrections as needed (squeeze of the finger is all that's needed). The prong is placed similar to how I described above with the conformation collar and because it's already digging into the dog's neck, a squeeze of a finger is all that's needed for a clear correction.

Ages ago, a trainer described prongs as "jaws" of a correcting alpha dog. And I think that perception might be a little dramatic but it did describe why this collar used to be reserved only for dog breeds who were more thick skinned and stubborn and needed more profound corrections than chain rattling and even pop corrections with the choke chain. I think.

Anyway, I think most dogs do not require prongs in training. But prongs do serve a purpose if you have a stubborn or overpowered dog and you need a little more control.

As far as what collars are meaner than others. It goes right along with the whole "ecollar" debates. Ecollars are practical and harmless with most experienced trainers. In hands of idiots who don't want to train the dogs and just want a collar that does everything for them - you have bad things happening.

Prongs are about the same. Ditto choke chains.

I've seen dogs pulling with prongs on while their owners are pulling back - and I think that's how injuries happen. And the effectiveness of that tool is ruined by incorrect use. Prongs are effective as a training tool - until dogs learn to pull on them. Likewise, prongs are effective training tools, but some people overuse them and the dogs may get used to them or you get the coat and skin issues.
 

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I counted once and I think I have seven different types of collars in my house. LOL
 

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I have a variety of collars. I use a 2.25 Curogan Herm Sprenger in my new obedience class. It inhibits Logan's desire to invite every dog he meets out for a beer. If this is considered thread highjacking, I'll start a new thread -- but what sort of lead do y'all use for obedience? I feel like my 1" regular leashes are too bulky.

I just counted and Logan has seven collars with matching leads. It's like doggie fashion to me. 😅
 

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My oldest training leash is 3/8".

The walking leashes I have for my babies which double up as training leashes if needed are 1/2".

I like short leashes (2-3 foot leashes) for training with. Even showing... I'm in the process of ordering a new show lead for conformation and I've asked for 30".
 

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My oldest training leash is 3/8".

The walking leashes I have for my babies which double up as training leashes if needed are 1/2".

I like short leashes (2-3 foot leashes) for training with. Even showing... I'm in the process of ordering a new show lead for conformation and I've asked for 30".
Thanks!
 

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I use 3-ft, 1/2” braided leashes for Obedience/Rally. With the exception of group stays.
 
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